DISSEMINATION OF IDEAS AND METHODS FOR INCREASING STUDENT RESEARCH IN THE CURRICULUM

As NSF AIRE grant recipients, we are eager to share the successes of our program and, through a variety of mechanisms, gather information and disseminate it to the community at Colby and beyond. Our efforts at dissemination include presentations at meetings, tours and discussion with visiting faculty, participating in workshops related to science education, and publications about our educational transformations. Also, this website was established to distribute information on the progress of our AIRE grant.

Papers/Publications

Brown, B. and C.B. Congdon. 2000. Gender equity and technology in the classroom. Business Educators Association of Maine Conference, Waterville,Maine. October 20, 2000

Burtt, Jr., E.H., and Wilson, Jr., W.H. 1999. A survey of undergraduate ornithology courses in North America. Wilson Bull. 111:287-293

Congdon, C.B. 2000. Machine Learning in the Liberal Arts Curriculum. ,Proceedings of the 31st SIGCSE Technical Symposium in Computer Science Education, Austin, TX. Professor Congdon also led a discussion session, "Birds of a Feather."

Congdon, C.B. 2001. Experiences with small robots, from "The Use of Robots in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Experience Reports.” Panel discussion at SIGCSE, the Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, February 23, 2001. (SIGCSE is the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group in Computer Science Education; this is an international conference).

Congdon, C.B. 2001. Robots don't rule: some thoughts on using robots for Introductory CS. Proceedings of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Spring Symposium Series, March 26- 28, 2001, Stanford University.

Congdon, C.B. 2001. Experiences with Small Robots,” Powerpoint slides from “The Use of Robots in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Experience Reports” panel discussion at SIGCSE-2001.

Congdon, C.B. 2001. Machine Learning for the Masses. Curriculum Descant column for Intelligence magazine, Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group in Artificial Intelligence, vol. 12, no. 2,Summer 2001.

Downey, A.B. 1999. Teaching experimental design in an operating systems class. Proceedings of Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Firmage, D.H. and F.R. Cole. 1999. A watershed study of Great Pond (Central Maine), a service learning project. Presented at the New England Lakes Conference, Auburn, Maine, June 18-20th.

Firmage, D. H. and F. R. Cole. 1999. The challenges of integrating service-learning in the Biology:Environmental Science curriculum at Colby College. Harold Ward, Ed. Pages 25-37 IN: Acting Locally: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Environmental Studies. Published by American Association of Higher Education. Washington, D.C. Download PDF version

Firmage, D.H. and P.J. Nyhus. 2000. Water quality issues and citizen monitoring: East Pond – Belgrade Lakes. Paper given at the Maine Water Conference, August, ME, April 13.

Firmage, D.H., F.R. Cole, and E.H. Yeterian. 2000. Highlights of Colby College’s NSF-AIRE grant. Presented at the RAIRE/AIRE meeting at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, November 30, 2000.

Firmage, D.H., P.J., Nyhus, and F.R. Cole. 2001. Enhancing undergraduate education through research in the environmental science laboratory: GIS and project-based learning at Colby College. Presented at the National Conference of Undergraduate Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, March 15-18, 2001

Fleming, J.R. 1999. "Education through Research: Colby STS and NSF-AIRE" (Panel Organized with Students) 14th Annual Meeting of the National Association of Science, Technology and Society, Baltimore, MD, March 1999.

Fleming, J.R. and A.A. Lyons '98. 1998. The Minor for All Majors: STS and the Liberal Arts at Colby College. Bulletin of Science, Technology, and Society 18:45-46.

Greenwood, P.G. 2001. Slug stingers: intracellular trafficking in stolen goods. Presented at Colby College, for Colby Today, March 28, 2001.

Jones, R.M. 2000. Design and implementation of computer games: A capstone course for undergraduate computer science education. Proceedings of the Thirty-First SIGCSE Technical Symposium in Computer Science Education, 260-264. Austin, TX.

Kortyna, A. and D.A. Tate. Experimental atomic physics: advanced laboratory course as a gateway to undergraduate research. Presented at the NCUR 2001 meeting, Lexington, Kentucky, March 14-17th, 2001.

Morton, L.S. and C.R. Bevier. 2001. Integrating inquiry-based learning into a distributional biology course. Presented at the NCUR 2001 meeting, Lexington, Kentucky, March 14-17th, 2001.

Nyhus, P. J., F. R. Cole, D. H. Firmage, and E. H. Yeterian. Developing and Implementing an Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Research Symposium at a small liberal arts college. In review

Nyhus, P.J., F.R. Cole, D.H. Firmage, and P.S.Lehmann ‘01. 2002. Enhancing undergraduate education through research in the environmental science laboratory: GIS and project-based learning at Colby College. In Press. CUR Quarterly.

Nyhus, P.J., F.R. Cole, and D.H. Firmage. 2000. Using NSF-AIRE to Introduce New Technology for Teaching and Research at Colby College. Presented at the RAIRE/AIRE meeting at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, November 30th, 2000.

Nyhus, Philip J., David H. Firmage and F. Russell Cole. 1999. Immersing Ourselves: Integrating GIS and Inquiry-Based Learning for Regional Water Quality Assessment at Colby College. Sigma Xi Forum, Minneapolis, MN.

Nyhus, P.J., D.H. Firmage and F.R. Cole. 1999. Immersing Ourselves: Integrating GIS and Inquiry-Based Learning for Regional Water Quality Assessment at Colby College. Sigma Xi Forum, Minneapolis, MN.

Nyhus, P.J., F.R. Cole, D.H. Firmage, and E.H. Yeterian. Teaching Fellows: An Innovative Approach to Facilitate the Integration of Research and Education at Colby College. In review

Perkins, L.E. ’01, and R. Deike. 2001. A case study of geoscience education and assessment: designing and implementing a geologic mapping class for students with no prior geology knowledge: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Program, 33:A75. NE Regional GSA, Burlington, VT. 11-15 March 2001.

Randall, A.K. ’01 and R. Deike. 2001. Emerging paradigms of granite genesis: incorporation in K-12 geoscience education: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Program, 33:A75. NE Regional GSA, Burlington, VT. 11-15 March 2001.

Shattuck, T.W. S.U. Dunham, D.W. King, S.U. Dunham, D.M. Thamattoor, J.T. Millard, B.P. Mundy, R.R. Conry, and M.H. Hennessy, 2001. Molecular Modeling in the Undergraduate Curriculum. Presented at the American Chemical Society meeting in San Diego, California.

Shosa, J.D., D.L. Woodrow, and S.E. Orrell. 2000. Self-contained problem sets as a means of incorporating quantitative skill development in existing introductory geoscience courses. J. Geosci. Ed., 48:427-430.

Shosa, J.D., M.J. Charles ’02, C.F. Lindley ’02, A.L. Randall ’01, W.R. Simpson ’02, W.J. Tackaberry, ’01, and L.J. Wilcox ’01. 2001. The class research project as a curricular foundation for a structural geology course: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Program, 33(1):A75. NE Regional GSA, Burlington, VT. 11-15 March 2001.

Theberge, S.M., D.W. King, J.T. Millard, B. Fekete, and L. Miller. 2000. Chemistry of crime: A forensics-based laboratory course for non-science majors. Presented at the 219th ACS National Meeting.

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Meetings with dissemination opportunities

Professor of Computer Science Dale Skrien participated last year in a workshop entitled, "Object-oriented Curricula: The Future of CS2" while he was at the Object-oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications Conference in Vancouver, B.C. on October 18-22, 1998. The workshop addressed how object-oriented languages and design affect the second course in computer science and the full first year of computer science in the undergraduate curriculum.

Assistant Professor of Computer Science Clare Congdon met last spring with computer science faculty from Colby, Bates, and Bowdoin Colleges. During that meeting, Dr. Congdon spoke on the use of robots in computer science classes (the talk title was "Robots across the Curriculum"). Further, Dr. Congdon has been developing a Web site for using robots in computer science classes in collaboration with professors from Bowdoin College

Professor of Biology Herb Wilson serves on the Undergraduate Outreach Committee of the Wilson Ornithological Society. During the past meeting in June 1999 (held on the Colby campus in Waterville, Maine), he discussed the value of ornithological research in undergraduate education and emphasized the goals of this grant.

April 28-29, 2000, Clare Congdon attended a regional computer science education conference (CCSCNE), escorting three students who presented posters and again attracting positive attention to the growing Colby Computer Science Department. One student won a prize for his work.

Professor Congdon also attended the elite Liberal Arts Consortium for computer science at small colleges, held at Bowdoin College, June 22-24, 2000, to discuss pedagogical issues within our academic environments and discipline.

Professors Robert Bluhm, F. Russell Cole, Dean of Faculty Edward Yeterian, and Leanna Hush '99 attended and participated in an AAHE Conference on Institutional Change, Wash. DC, Nov. 1998. Representatives from all of the AIRE schools were present at the meeting.

Colby College hosted a meeting of the New England Section of the American Physical Society, November 5-6, 1999. The meeting was organized by Professor Charles Conover. One session was devoted to physics education, with two plenary talks: Physics, Inquiry, and Professional Development K-8 Robert Prigo and Gregg Humphrey (Middlebury College) Lighting up Science for Elementary and Middle Schools Steven Davis, (Physical Sciences Incorporated)

Dale Skrien (Computer Science) Invited participant at the CUPM (Committee on Undergraduate Preparation in Mathematics) workshop on Math, CS, and Physics, at Bowdoin College, October 29-31, 1999. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the use and instruction of mathematics for CS and Physics majors.

Dale Skrien (Computer Science) Participated in an OOPSLA '98 (Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications) workshop on how to teach object-oriented programming in the first year, October 18-22, 1998, in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Dale Skrien (Computer Science) Participated in an OOPSLA '2000 (Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications) workshop on active learning strategies for teaching object-oriented software design, October 15-19, 2000, in Minneapolis.

R. Jones was a member of a panel titled "Special session on undergraduate education in cognitive science" at the Twenty-Second Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society in Philadelphia, PA, August 2000. The title of the presentation was "Projects for introductory courses on cognitive science".

Biology and Environmental Studies. Piper Professor of Environmental Science (ES) David H. Firmage has engaged in three additional activities.

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Workshops

April 14, 2000 - NSF-AIRE Fellow Larkspur Morton led a workshop on teaching techniques, entitled Engaging Students in Lecture Courses; Sharing Approaches Across the Disciplines. This workshop included sections on a) engaging students in active learning, b) encouraging student preparation for lecture, and c) teaching process vs. content: a balancing act.

Professor and Chair of Computer Science Dale Skrien participated in a workshop on using active learning in teaching object-oriented design at OOPSLA 2000 (Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications), October 15-19, 2000, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He also participated in a Workshop on Component-Based Software Development at The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, June 11-15, 2001. This workshop focused on how to teach computer science using the pervasive software components in modern computer systems instead of having the students start from scratch.

On May 24, 2001, NSF-AIRE Fellow Dr. Larkspur Morton coordinated a well-received workshop entitled, “Inquiring Minds Want to Know: Engaging Students in the Process of Discovery in Lectures, Laboratory, and the Library.” The sessions were organized by topic with point persons leading the discussion. Topics covered included beginning and guiding the process of inquiry, using one’s own research as a basis for student inquiry, critical interpretation of intellectual works, teaching students to analyze critically their own research, use and interpretation of statistics, and the costs and benefits of inquiring together or alone. The agenda for and summary of the workshop can be found at the following Web site www.colby.edu/NSF_AIRE/TW2001.htm. Spring 2001 - Inquiring minds


Dr. Morton also was active in the Writing Across the Curriculum program and participated in several workshops including one on evaluating student writing.


On June 4-6, 2001, NSF-AIRE Fellow Philip Nyhus coordinated a workshop on the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in the classroom. Thirteen faculty, staff, and students participated in this three-day workshop, designed primarily for college educators with little or no prior GIS experience. Participants were taught about GIS software and hardware and how GIS can be used in the classroom and laboratory. During the first day, participants were given a general overview of GIS, basic data models, components of GIS, sources of GIS data, GIS databases, and GIS software. These participants were then exposed to ArcView GIS, one of the most commonly used GIS platforms, with which they learned how to create maps, work with legends and symbols, and add text to the map. They also learned many other mapping skills. During the second day, the group delved deeper into more advanced levels of cartography and ArcView GIS. During the final day, the group conducted a case study of a nearby local lake, the skills from which will be directly applicable to the course, Problems in Environmental Science. The final evaluations indicated that the workshop was well received and participants left ready to move to advanced levels of GIS.