Meaghan Fitzgerald, ’08, Spoonfed/ Evently Marketing Director

meaghan fitzgeraldA week after her graduation in 2008, Meaghan Fitzgerald moved to London. While Fitzgerald had no initial plans for the move, “three days off the plane, [she] met two young men who had just graduated from the London School of Economics and had begun a technology startup company.” One week later, Fitzgerald started as a marketing employee for the company, and she’s worked there ever since.

The startup, now officially called Evently, originated as a web-based search outlet for users to scope major events in and around London. The company also sells and creates software that helps organizers market and promote their events. As marketing director for Evently, Fitzgerald communicates directly with potential customers of Evently’s products, and thus must always understand her audience. Since Evently develops software for event organizers, Fitzgerald, naturally, describes her clientele as an eclectic bunch. “One day I might be speaking to a comedian interested in promoting her next gig or to a nightclub owner, trying to fill his club with the right kind of clientele. The next day I could be producing a white paper for a business conference organizer or a PR agency looking to organize a music festival and promote a brand.” Fitzgerald’s professional writing is “exceptionally analytical and data-driven.” Fitzgerald and her Evently team tailor correspondence to each client’s business goals. Beyond initial contact, Fitzgerald will analyze the communication process and customer responses for future reference within the company.

Fitzgerald is also responsible for increasing traffic on the company’s website, http://www.spoonfed.co.uk/. She manages Evently’s search engine optimization campaign that plans and executes backlinking and keyword research strategies. Essentially, through Fitzgerald’s work, Evently filters through the Internet’s Domain Name System via search semantics, in lieu of paid search engine results. In this manner, Evently can harness more users and clientele.

No matter the task, persuasive and analytical writing is crucial to Fitzgerald’s work, yet, as with other elements of the media business, she’s found that the process itself changes based on the medium at hand. Fitzgerald says, “a great example is a current challenge of mine: coming up with a short, snappy catch-line for a new website.” Fitzgerald further focuses on promoting the company’s publicity through sources like the iPhone application called Spoonfed Radar. The application scans for users’ current locations and tabulates nearby events from a battery of Evently’s local listings. Applications such as these display Fitzgerald’s neat command of both technology and writing in the media market.

-Amy Cunningham, William D. Adams Presidential Scholar, ‘15