Russian Courses

 
COURSE OFFERINGS
 
113j    The Literature and Art of St. Petersburg    In St. Petersburg, Russia. Students read Pushkin, Dostoevsky, and other major St. Petersburg writers and learn about the city's art and architecture in classroom lectures and museum visits. Theater and concert performances are included; residence is with a Russian family. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Russian required. Nongraded. Estimated cost in 2010: $2,500. Required meetings on campus in November and December. Early registration required. Three credit hours.    INSTRUCTOR

114j    Russia's Transition Economy     In St. Petersburg, Russia. Daily class lectures and planned site visits introduce students to the Soviet centralized economy and its evolution since the 1950s. Topics include militarization, industrialization, collectivization, budgets and taxation, inflation and currency reforms, banks, investment, the new Russian entrepreneur, stock markets, the oligarchs, and "natural" monopolies. Cultural program included; residence is with a Russian family. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Russian required. Nongraded. Estimated cost in 2010: $2,600. Required meetings on campus in November and December. Early registration required. Three credit hours.    INSTRUCTOR

115j    Russian Ethnography    In St. Petersburg, Russia. Class lectures and discussions, field trips to the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography and to the Russian Ethnographical Museum, and day excursions outside the city introduce students to many of the Russian Federation's minority ethnic groups, including the indigenous peoples of Siberia, Russia's northern peoples, Jews, Cossacks, and others. Lectures will contrast tsarist policy to Soviet ethnic policy of the 20th century. Cultural program included; residence is with a Russian family. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Russian required. Nongraded. Estimated cost in 2010: $2,600. Required meetings on campus in November and December. Early registration required. Three credit hours.    INSTRUCTOR

125f, 126s    Elementary Russian I    The structure of the Russian language, spoken Russian, listening comprehension, and reading and writing of basic Russian. In addition to the textbook, multimedia materials in the Language Resource Center aid in understanding both the language and culture of Russia. Prerequisite: Russian 125 is prerequisite for 126. Four credit hours.    DE SHERBININ

125Jj    Elementary Russian I    The structure of the Russian language, spoken Russian, listening comprehension, and reading and writing of basic Russian. In addition to the textbook, multimedia materials in the Language Resource Center aid in understanding both the language and culture of Russia. Offered in St. Petersburg. Estimated cost in 2010: $2,600. Required meetings on campus in November and December. Early registration required. Three credit hours.    INSTRUCTOR

127f, 128s    Intermediate Russian    Increased emphasis on reading and writing skills; continued use of multimedia aids in improving oral and listening skills. Prerequisite: Russian 126; Russian 127 is prerequisite for 128. Four credit hours.    MONASTIREVA-ANSDELL

135fs    Conversation Group     An informal, weekly, small-group meeting appropriate for second-year students concurrently enrolled in Russian 126, 127, or 128. Topics for discussion include autobiography, education, leisure-time activities, travel, stores, and films. Conducted entirely in Russian. May be repeated for credit. Nongraded. One credit hour.    KAN

[174]    Chekhov and the Short Story     Study of the American and British short story as it was influenced by the Russian master of the short story, Anton Chekhov. Readings include Chekhov's early humorous stories and his mature works, essays on the short story, and selected stories by Raymond Carver, Bernard Malamud, Katherine Mansfield, Alice Munro, Joyce Carol Oates, Eudora Welty, Virginia Woolf, Richard Wright, and others. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Russian required. Three credit hours.  L.    

[231]    Topics in 19th-Century Russian Literature    When the course is offered, themes vary. Topic areas highlight a literary period, an author, or a genre. Conducted in English. Four credit hours.  L.    

[232]    Topics in 19th-Century Russian Literature    When the course is offered, themes vary. Topic areas highlight a literary period, an author, or a genre. Conducted in English. Four credit hours.  L.    

237f    Gamblers, Madmen, and Murderers (in English)     Selected stories and novels by world-renowned 19th-century Russian writers (Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov) read through the analytical lens of gender construction. What is the relationship between masculinity and the Russian state? Emphasizes skills in symbolic reading and the development of cogent arguments in speaking and writing, including work with drafts of papers. First-year students are welcome. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Russian required. Four credit hours.  L.    DE SHERBININ

242s    Russian Cinema from Lenin to Putin (in English)     A survey of major periods, genres, and themes of Russia's "most important art," including Soviet Revolutionary montage cinema of the 1920s (Kuleshov, Vertov, Eisenstein, Dovzhenko), Stalinist "easterns" and propaganda musicals of the 1930s and '40s (Vasiliev Brothers, Aleksandrov), the post-Stalinist cinematic revival of the 1950s and '60s (Kalatozov, Tarkovsky, Muratova, Askoldov), and the post-Soviet search for new aesthetics, themes, and heroes (Balabanov, Bodrov, Zviagintsev, Sokurov). Topics will include issues of gender, class, and ethnicity; the theory and aesthetics of Soviet and Russian filmmakers; the development of the Russian and Soviet film industry; issues of censorship, production, and film distribution. Conducted in English. Four credit hours.  A, I.    MONASTIREVA-ANSDELL

325f, 326s    Conversation and Composition    Reading and analysis of literary and historical texts from the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics change each year. Grammar review and continued practice in oral and written expression. Multimedia materials supplement the readings. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 128; Russian 325 is prerequisite for 326. Four credit hours.    DE SHERBININ

335fs    Conversation Group    An informal weekly small-group meeting for intermediate/advanced conversation practice in Russian. Topics include contemporary film, current social and political issues, and reflections on cultural differences between the United States and Russia. Conducted entirely in Russian. May be repeated for credit. Nongraded. Prerequisite: Russian 127 or equivalent. One credit hour.    KAN

346s    20th-Century Russian Poetry    Weekly one-hour meetings focus on poems by one of the major 20th-century Russian poets, including Blok, Akhmatova, Tsvetaeva, Pasternak, Mandelshtam, and Brodsky. Readings in Russian; discussion in English. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Russian 127. One credit hour.    DE SHERBININ

[425]    Short Works     Readings and filmic texts that change every year. Lectures, and discussions of selected 19th- to 21st-century stories, essays, films, and media texts. Sample topics include Madness in Russian Literature, Chekhov's Works, and Post-Soviet Literature. Prerequisite: Russian 325. Four credit hours.  L.    

[426]    The 19th-Century Russian Novel    A seminar that analyzes one major Russian novel of the 19th century, such as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. Conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 425 or 427. Four credit hours.  L.    

427f    Re-Imaging Russia: Cinema and Russian Society 1986-2009    Cinema's social and ideological functions in late-Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. Topics include defining Russia's position in regard to capitalism, the West, and Western values; making sense of organized crime and re-division of political and economic power; struggling for a positive vision of Russian national identity; reassessing the Stalinist past; re-negotiating gender roles; evaluating Soviet imperial ambitions and their enduring legacy; and exploring the place of non-Russians within the Russian Federation. Extensive work in advanced conversation, grammar, and writing. Conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 325. Four credit hours.  L.    MONASTIREVA-ANSDELL

428s    The 20th-Century Russian Novel     A seminar that analyzes one major Russian novel of the 20th century. In spring 2010, Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. Additional readings and film excerpts highlight the novel's literary and historical context and the life and times of the author. Conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 425 or 427. Four credit hours.  L.    DE SHERBININ

491f, 492s    Independent Study    Individual projects in areas where the student has demonstrated the interest and competence necessary for independent work. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One to four credit hours.    FACULTY