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GLOBAL STUDIES

 

REQUIREMENTS +

Requirements for the Major in International Studies

Up to 14 courses, including the five courses that constitute the core curriculum; three courses in area studies; three courses from policy studies; and one senior seminar or appropriate independent study (International Studies 491 or 492). At least one seminar or senior project must be completed during the senior year as the capstone experience. Majors must complete a concentration within the major unless they have a double major or minor in anthropology, economics, government, history, French studies, Spanish, Latin American studies, environmental studies, Russian, East Asian studies, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, or German studies. Majors also must complete the equivalent of two courses beyond the introductory (usually through 131) level in a modern foreign language. Students are encouraged to develop language skills relevant to their regional specialization. At least one semester of foreign study is required, although under exceptional circumstances students with extensive overseas experience can petition the director and the advisory committee to be exempted. A student must receive a grade of C- or better for a course to count toward the major. No courses listed for the major may be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Note: Students must have at least a 2.7 grade point average by the end of the sophomore year to be eligible for foreign study. Students who do not meet this minimum requirement will not be able to retain their international studies major.

 

Note to junior transfer students: The College requires that all students spend at least four semesters in residence at Colby. Therefore, to satisfy the semester-abroad requirement for the major, junior transfer students must either stay for a fifth semester or enroll in a summer study-abroad program for at least nine credits (unless the study-abroad requirement has been met in some other way).

Courses Composing the Core Curriculum

Anthropology 112, Economics 133 and 134, Government 131, and History 276.

Courses Approved to Fulfill the Area Studies Component

Note that (a) at least two courses must be drawn from the same region and one course from a different region, and (b) courses must be drawn from at least two disciplines.


Latin America:

Anthropology 231 Caribbean Cultures
235 Ethnographies of Latin America: Violence and  Democracy in the Andes
Economics 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary  Latin America
Government 253 Latin American Politics
335 United States-Latin American Relations
450 Democratization in Latin America
History 274 Race, Religion, and Frontiers in Iberian-American Colonization
275 Strongmen and Populism in Modern Spain and Latin America
277 History of the Maya from 200 B.C.
473 Research Seminar: Roots of Political and Ethnic Conflict in Modern Latin America
Latin American Studies 173 History of Latin America
174 Introduction to Latin American Studies
Spanish 265 The Short Novel in Spanish America
266 Language of Spanish Cinema
273 Contemporary Spanish-American Short Story
354 Detectives and Spies: Forms of Popular Culture in Spanish-American Fiction
371 The Colonial Experience
493 Senior Seminar (when appropriate)
 


Europe and Russia:

French 232 Cultural History of France
233 Contemporary France
238 Introduction to the Francophone World
252 Provocative Texts: Engaging the World
358 Passionate Discontent: The 19th-Century Epidemic
372 France and Africa
376 Shadows of the Past: Remembering Vichy France and the Holocaust
397 Love, Marriage, and Friendship in Early Modern France
493 Seminar (when appropriate)
German 231 Introduction to German Studies
237 The German Fairy Tale in Popular Culture
298 Youth, Pop, Violence
397 Case Studies in German Literary History
493 Seminar: Ideologies and Identities
Government 243 Politics of Subnational Culture and Identity in Europe
259 European Politics
266 German Politics
354 The European Union
359 Political Ideologies and Revolutionary Movements  in Europe
History 112 A Survey of Modern Europe
220 Yugoslavia: Emergence to Dissolution
224 Germany and Europe, 1871-1945
227 The Russian Empire: Russia Looks to the West, 1613-          1905     
228 The Russian Empire: Soviet History and  20th-Century Revolutions
297 Radical Europe, 1789-1968
322 Europe and the Second World War
327 Daily Life Under Stalin
397B Death in Early Modern Europe
421 Research Seminar: Debating the Nazi Past
445 Research Seminar: Nuclear Madness
498C French Revolution and Human Rights
International Studies 451 Ethnicity, Nationalism, and the State in Europe
Russian 231 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky
232 Topics in 19th-Century Russian Literature
237 Gamblers, Madmen, and Murderers
346 20th-Century Russian Poetry
425 20th-Century Short Works
426 The 19th-Century Russian Novel
427 Re-Imaging Russia: Cinema and Russian Society  1986-2009
428 The 20th-Century Russian Novel
Spanish 266 Language of Spanish Cinema
334 Women in Hispanic Texts
351 Ideology and Ethics in Spanish Golden Age Literature
352 Don Quijote
371 The Colonial Experience
493 Seminar (when appropriate)
 


Africa:

Anthropology 237 Ethnographies of Africa
297A Globalizing Africa
341 Culture, Mobility, Identity: Encounters in the African Diaspora 
397A Religions of Africa and the African Diaspora
French 238 Introduction to the Francophone World
361 Francophone Cultures and Literatures of the Indian Ocean
372 France and Africa
History 261 African History
364 Environmental and Health History in Africa


The Middle East:

Government 251 Israelis and Palestinians: Conflict and Accommodation
252 Politics of the Middle East
358 Comparative Arab Politics
History 184 History of the Modern Middle East
381 Women and Gender in Islam
389 History of Iran


Asia:

Anthropology 239 Southeast Asian Cultures and Societies
339 Asian Pacific Modernities
East Asian Studies 152 Introduction to East Asia from the 18th Century  to Modern Times
231 The Chinese Novel: Vignettes of Life in Imperial China
252 Hell on Earth? Chinese Writers on Modern Chinese Society
254 China in Transition
257 From Communism to Consumerism
261 Japanese Language and Culture
271 Women in Japanese Cinema and Literature
353 Globalization and Human Rights in China
Economics 292 Economic Transition in China
294 Economic Policy and Performance in East Asia
Government 256 Conflict in East Asia
355 Winners and Losers in Chinese Politics
356 Winners and Losers in Japanese Politics
Religious Studies 117 Passage to India: India and the Western Imagination
211 Religions of India
212 Religions of China, Japan, and Tibet
312 South Asian Women at the Crossroads:  Tradition and Modernity
317 Sikhism: Scripture, Sacred Music, and Art

Courses Approved to Fulfill the Policy Studies Component
Courses must be drawn from at least two different disciplines.

Anthropology 213 Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples
236 Illegal Drugs, Law, and the State
256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
297A Globalizing Africa
297B Culture, Power and International Development
373 The Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality
398A Global Youth Cultures
Economics 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary  Latin America
231 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
271  International Economic Integration
273 Economics of Globalization
292 Economic Transition in China
294 Economic Policy and Performance in East Asia
298 Energy Economics
333 Evolution of the Global Economy
335 Economic Development
373 Open-Economy Macroeconomics
378 International Trade
471 Multinational Corporations
474 Economic Demography
479 Wealth and Poverty of Nations
Environmental Studies 235 International Environmental Human Rights
334 International Environmental Regimes
339 Development, Trade, and the Environment
341 Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
Government 231 United States Foreign Policy: The Cold War
238 Politics of War Crime Tribunals
251 Israelis and Palestinians: Conflict and Accommodation
263 Democracy Assistance
331 Business and American Foreign Policy
332 International Organization
333 Globalization and Social Innovation
335 United States-Latin American Relations
354 The European Union
357 Political Economy of Regionalism
359 Political Ideologies and Revolutionary Movements in      Europe
432 Seminar: United States Foreign Policy
435 Seminar: Memory and Politics
451 Seminar: Political Violence, Revolutions, and Ethnic Conflict
454 Seminar: Politics of Development
History 322 Europe and the Second World War
347 America in Vietnam
364 Environmental and Health History of Africa
374 Religion and World War II
394 Ecological History
446 Research Seminar: Historical Epidemiology
447 Research Seminar: The Cold War
International Studies 211 Human Rights and Social Struggles in Global Perspective
352 Internationalism: From Socialism to the World Social Forum
437 Media, Culture, and the Political Imagination
Science, Technology, and Society 358 Climbing the Oil Peak
   
Courses Approved to Fulfill the Seminar Requirement
*Note: The student must submit a copy of the title page of the seminar paper signed by the instructor to demonstrate appropriateness.

Anthropology 451 Ethnicity, Nationalism, and the State in Europe
452 Anthropology of Power
Economics451 Ethnicity, Nationalism, and the State in Europe

4— Senior Seminar (if topic is appropriate*)
Environmental Studies 493 Environmental Policy Practicum (if topic is appropriate*)
Government 432 Seminar: United States Foreign Policy
435 Seminar: Memory and Politics
450 Seminar: Democratization in Latin America
451 Seminar: Political Violence
454 Seminar: Politics of Development
History 421 Research Seminar: Debating the Nazi Past
445 Research Seminar: Nuclear Madness
446 Research Seminar: Historical Epidemiology
447 Research Seminar: The Cold War
461 Research Seminar: History and Development of Islamic law
473 Political and Ethnic Conflict in Modern Latin America
International Studies 437 Media, Culture, and the Political Imagination

451 Ethnicity, Nationalism, and the State in Europe
Languages Senior-level seminar (if topic is appropriate*)

Note: Students can petition the director of the program to count a seminar-style 200- or 300-level course toward the seminar requirement. In such cases, students also will be expected to enroll in International Studies 491 or 492 (for two credits) to complete an original research paper. Approval of this option is at the discretion of the instructor and the advisory committee. Students may also pursue a four-credit independent research project (International Studies 491 or 492) to fulfill the senior requirement. 

Note: Some courses are listed under two or three categories; with the exception of counting courses toward the concentration or a second major (if students have a relevant double major or minor [see above]), no single course can be used to satisfy more than one requirement. A minor must have four freestanding courses not required for the major. Students may petition to include other courses if the course has a substantial international component and is approved by the director and advisory committee.

Honors Program in International Studies

An honors program is available in which the student can pursue a year-long independent research project that also fulfills the seminar requirement; successful completion of this project may entitle the student to graduate “With Honors in International Studies.” To be eligible, a student must have a grade point average of 3.5 or better in the major and should submit a statement of intent to the program director by May 1 of the junior year. A workshop on writing honors proposals will be held in early September of the senior year, and the final deadline for submission of a completed honors thesis proposal is the third Friday in September. See the International Studies Handbook (online) for further information about procedures, including mid-year evaluation and deadline for completion of the thesis.

Requirements for Concentrations

Majors are required to complete either a regional or policy concentration unless they have a double major or minor in anthropology, Chinese, East Asian studies, economics, environmental studies, French studies, German studies, government, history, Italian, Japanese, Latin American studies, Russian, or Spanish. Students may propose an independent concentration. Concentrations should be declared by the spring of the sophomore year. 

Regional Concentrations

A regional concentration requires completion of the following:

  • Four courses dealing with a specific region. Courses appropriate to each region are listed above under the area studies component. At least two of those courses should be taken at Colby.  At least one of the four courses must be drawn from the social sciences and at least one other from the humanities.
  •  
  • A coordination of area specialization with study abroad. For European concentrators, study abroad would normally take place in a non-English-speaking country.
  • A coordination of the language requirement with foreign study where Colby offers an appropriate program.
  • A seminar project or independent study in the senior year that addresses issues in the chosen area.

Policy or Functional Concentrations

Five tracks have been established for policy concentrations:

  • International Relations/Foreign Policy
  • International Economic Policy
  • Development Studies
  • Global Environmental Studies
  • Human Rights/Social Justice

Each track requires at least four courses designated as relevant to the respective field plus a seminar or an independent senior project relevant to the chosen specialization. Note that some of the courses appropriate for these concentrations are not designated as international studies courses. While they are relevant to their respective specialization, they do not count toward the requirements for the major or the grade point average in the major. These courses are designated by an asterisk (*).

International Relations/Foreign Policy

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) in addition to four of the courses listed below, two of which should be from the Government Department and one from the Economics Department. Introduction to American Government is strongly encouraged as an additional course.

Economics273 Economics of Globalization

333 Evolution of the Global Economy
335 Economic Development
378 International Trade
471 Multinational Corporations
479 The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
Government 231 United States Foreign Policy: The Cold War
238 Politics of War Crime Tribunals
256 Conflict in East Asia
263 Democracy Assistance
332 International Organization
334 International Environmental Regimes
335 United States-Latin American Relations
354 The European Union
357 Political Economy of Regionalism
359 Political Ideologies and Revolutionary Movements in Europe
432 Seminar: United States Foreign Policy
435 Seminar: Memory and Politics
History 275 Strongmen and Populism in Modern Spain and Latin America
322 Europe and the Second World War
347 America in Vietnam
374 Religion and World War II
447 Research Seminar: The Cold War
 


International Economic Policy

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below; one must be outside of economics:

Anthropology 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
Economics 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary  Latin America
271 International Economic Integration
273 Economics of Globalization
292 Economic Transition in China
294 Economic Policy and Performance in East Asia
297 International Economic Problems: 21st Century Globalization
298 Energy Economics
333 Evolution of the Global Economy
335 Economic Development
373 Open-Economy Macroeconomics
378 International Trade
471 Multinational Corporations
474 Economic Demography
479 The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
Government 332 International Organization
354 The European Union
357 Political Economy of Regionalism
History 364 Environmental and Health History of Africa
 


Development Studies

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below, one of which is drawn from Anthropology, one from Economics 214, 292 or 294, and one outside of anthropology and economics:

Anthropology 213 Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples
256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
297A Globalizing Africa
297B Culture, Power, and International Development
355 Development, Globalization, and Poverty
East Asian Studies 254 China in Transition
Economics   214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary     Latin America
292 Economic Transition in China
294 Economic Policy and Performance in East Asia
335 Economic Development
378 International Trade
471 Multinational Corporations
474 Economic Demography
French 372 France and Africa
Government 252 Politics of the Middle East
253 Latin American Politics
263 Democracy Assistance
333 Globalization and Social Innovation
353 Citizen Participation in Comparative Perspective
450 Seminar: Democratization in Latin America
451 Seminar: Political Violence
454 Seminar: Politics of Development
History 364 Environmental and Health History of Africa
394 Ecological History
International Studies 352 Internationalism: From Socialism to the World Social  Forum
Sociology 274 Social Inequality and Power


Global Environmental Studies

Four courses (plus a relevant senior seminar or independent paper), at least three of which must be drawn from the following:

Anthropology 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
Economics231 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
298 Energy Economics
4— Economics Seminar (if topic is appropriate)
Environmental Studies 235 International Environmental Human Rights
334 International Environmental Regimes
339 Development, Trade, and the Environment
341 Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
493 Environmental Policy Practicum
Government 333 Globalization and Social Innovation
334 International Environmental Regimes
357 Political Economy of Regionalism
History 394 Ecological History
446 Research Seminar: Historical Epidemiology
International Studies 297B International Environmental Human Rights

The fourth course can be taken from the above or from one of the courses listed below:

Economics 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary  Latin America
Government 332 International Organization
History 364 Environmental and Health History of Africa
 


Human Rights/Social Justice

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below, two of which are drawn from a core of Anthropology 236, 452, Government 333, International Studies 211, Sociology 274.

Anthropology 213 Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples
236 Illegal Drugs, Law, and the State
256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
341 Culture, Mobility, Identity: Encounters in the African Diaspora
452 Anthropology of Power
Government 272* Modern Political Theory
333 Globalization and Social Innovation
355 Winners and Losers in Chinese Politics
356 Winners and Losers in Japanese Politics
451 Seminar: Political Violence
International Studiess 211 Human Rights and Social Struggles in Global Perspective
235 International Environmental Human Rights
352 Internationalism: From Socialism to the World Social  Forum
437 Media, Culture, and the Political Imagination
Philosophy 236* Social and Political Philosophy
Sociology 274* Social Inequality and Power
Spanish 493 Seminar: Feminine Fictions
Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies311* Seminar in Feminist Theory

Photo: Brian DiMento '10
 

Faculty

 

Colby College reserves the right in its sole judgement to make changes of any nature in its program, calendar, academic schedule, fees, deposits, or any other matters in this catalogue.