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Greek Course Descriptions

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GK111f    Introductory Greek      Western civilization and culture finds its basis in the ideas and thoughts of the ancient Greeks. Students acquire the basic principles of ancient Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary while learning to translate simple and some compound sentences from Greek to English and from English into Greek. The grammatical and syntactical aspects also bring an appreciation for and understanding of a radically different culture, separated from us by time and space. Other learning goals include developing reading comprehension skills, enhancement of critical and analytical faculties, and attention to detail.     Four credit hours.    H. ROISMAN
GK112s    Intermediate Greek      Students continue to acquire the basic principles of ancient Greek through grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, and thus come closer to the ideas and thoughts of the ancient Greeks. Students will acquire the elementary knowledge of tools necessary to read original Greek text. Various passages in the original Greek bring students an appreciation of ancient Greek literature. Learning goals include developing reading comprehension skills, enhancement of critical and analytical faculties, attention to detail. Satisfies the second semester of language requirement. Prerequisite:  Greek 111.     Four credit hours.    H. ROISMAN
GK131f    Introduction to Greek Literature      Introduction to the reading of original ancient Greek text. The choice of text varies from year to year and consists of either poetry or prose. Focus on applying the concepts of syntax and grammar learned in previous semesters. It includes textual and literary analysis of the selected work. Learning goals include decoding of ancient text, further development of reading ancient Greek and comprehension skills, enhancement of critical and analytical faculties, improvement of oral argumentational structuring skills. Prerequisite:  Greek 112.     Four credit hours.  L.    H. ROISMAN
[GK232]    Male Deception: Sophocles's Philoctetes      Sophocles's Philoctetes dramatizes the suffering and rage of a hero who was abandoned on a deserted island because of a putrefied and bad-smelling wound. Ten years later his comrades realize that without Philoctetes and his bow Troy cannot be captured, and they want him back. The play questions the values of betrayal, loyalty, and friendship. It debates the value of truth and deception as means for attaining goals and of the war itself. Prerequisite:  Greek 131.     Four credit hours.  L.  
[GK235]    The Defense of Socrates: Xenophon's and Plato's Apology      What was Socrates's defense against the charge of impiety? Why was he willing to die? Plato and Xenophon give two different accounts of Socrates's pleas. Prerequisite:  Greek 131.     Four credit hours.  L.  
[GK239]    Revenge and Cowardice: Euripides's Electra      In the Euripidean version of the myth of Electra, the playwright asks his audience what happens when one parent murders the other. How does one reconcile the imperative to avenge a father's murder with matricide? Prerequisite:  Greek 131.     Four credit hours.  L.  
[GK252]    Euripides's Hippolytus: The Stepmother and the Prince      Phaedra lusts after her stepson Hippolytus, who expresses his devotion to the virgin goddess Artemis by choosing sexual chastity. His angry rejection of Phaedra's advances leads to suicide, false accusations of rape, and an ever-worsening family tragedy. We shall discuss and examine the interactions of this family through the prism of Greek tragedy's perspective on deception, truth, and emotional or devotional excess.     Four credit hours.  
GK258f    Politics of Revenge: Sophocles's Electra      Electra's own inaction in the face of her mother's crime is examined in this drama. Each of Greece's great tragedians confronted this horrifying tale of conflicting duties and responsibilities. The differing emphases and perspectives of Euripides and Sophocles will receive particular scrutiny. Prerequisite:  Greek 131.     Four credit hours.  L.    H. ROISMAN
[GK351]    Homer's Odyssey      Odysseus arrives at Scheria and meets Nausicaa. Will he be safe? Prerequisite:  Greek 131.     Four credit hours.  L.  
GK356s    Homer, Iliad 1: Hero's Rage      Achilles's quarrel with Agamemnon followed by his decision not to fight caused the Greeks and their allies many casualties and led to the deaths of Patroclus and Hector. The episode described in Iliad 1 questions the values of authority, hierarchy, bravery, gratitude, loyalty, and arrogance, as well as the attitude of the Homeric Greeks toward their wives and concubines. The description of events allows us to analyze the emotions of anger and restraint, as well as forgiveness. Learning goals include further development of Greek reading and comprehension skills, familiarity with the Homeric epic, enhancement of critical and analytical faculties, improvement of oral and argumentational structuring skills, and refinement of writing skills. Prerequisite:  Greek 131.     Four credit hours.  L.    H. ROISMAN