March Museum News

Fieldtrip Fever
Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Rhododendrons, Boston Public Gardens, 1899. The Joan Whitney Payson Collection—on loan to Colby for one semester every two years—is back, and its return has been eagerly awaited. Eighteen school groups spanning kindergarten through 11th grade are planning to tour the collection in March alone. The Payson Collection is popular for good reason: it includes works by some of the world’s most renowned artists, including Marc Chagall and Edgar Degas.


New Lunder Curator

On March 3 the museum welcomed the new Lunder Curator of American Art, Elizabeth Finch. Finch completed her Ph.D. at the City University of New York, and she has worked in New York as a curator, editor, and writer since 1990. At Colby her responsibilities will include managing the museum’s exhibition programming, overseeing scholarship and development of the collection, conducting research on the permanent collection, and organizing special exhibitions.

A Walk in the ParkWilliam Merritt Chase, Tompkins Park, Brooklyn, 1887.
The exact location depicted in a William Merritt Chase painting in the museum's permanent collection sparked such heated debate that Curatorial Assistant Hannah Blunt decided to end it for good. She traveled to Brooklyn, N.Y., to find out which park inspired the painting’s setting. Learn about her research on Thursday, March 6, at 12:30 pm. The lecture is free and open to the public, and at noon a free bag lunch is available to the first 40 guests.

Eggs-plorations
On Saturday, March 15, museum visitors can take a new kind of tour; instead of looking at art, they’ll be looking for it. Eggs-ploring Art will begin with a scavenger hunt in the Colby College Museum of Art followed by an egg-decorating workshop at Freshwater Arts downtown. This event is free and open to all ages, but attendance is limited and pre-registration is required. To register, call 207-680-2055.

World Class Art
The museum is not just a resource for art majors. One example: For two weeks beginning March 25, photographs taken by five Colby students who spent a month in China last summer will hang in the teaching gallery. East Asian Studies Associate Professor Hong Zhang won an ASAINetwork Freeman Student-Faculty grant to conduct research on the topic Tradition, Transition, and Modernity: Reconfiguration of Public Spaces in a Globalizing China. The photographs illustrate this theme.


Upcoming Events
For more information contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturdays, March 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum's galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Tours of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, March 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.

Noontime Art Talk: Thursday in the Park with William (Merritt Chase)
Thursday, March 6, noon
Colby College Museum of Art
Curatorial Assistant Hannah Blunt will discuss her research, which brings to an end a longstanding controversy over William Merritt Chase's painting. She will reveal which park is depicted. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people.

Noontime Art Talk: The Joan Whitney Payson Collection
Thursday, March 13, noon
Colby College Museum of Art
Mirken Curator of Education Lauren Lessing will discuss the seven works of art on biennial loan from the Portland Museum of Art. The collection includes paintings by Marc Chagall, Gustave Courbet, Edgar Degas, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Alfred Sisley. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people.

Eggs-ploring Art
Saturday, March 15, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art and Freshwater Arts, Waterville
Eggs-ploring Art will begin with a scavenger hunt in the Colby College Museum of Art followed by an egg-decorating workshop at Freshwater Arts. This event is free and open to all ages, but attendance is limited and pre-registration is required. To register, call 680-2055.

Artist Talk: Nina Katchadourian
Monday, March 17, 4:30 p.m.
Room 154, Bixler Building
Artist Nina Katchadourian works in a wide variety of media, including photography, sculpture, video, and sound. The subject of a 10-year retrospective at the Tang Museum in 2006, her work explores translations, organizational systems, and forms of communication, both human and animal. Katchadourian's 2003 photo essay, The Nightgown Pictures, from the Lunder Collection, is currently on view in the museum.


Ongoing Exhibitions

Adolph Gottlieb: Paintings and Early Prints
February 3-April 13
Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) was an early member of the Abstract Expressionist movement and a productive painter, printmaker, and sculptor. Primarily self-taught as a painter and printmaker, Gottlieb aimed to synthesize an intellectual approach to painting with his own emotional experience. This exhibition brings together 50 early prints and paintings that demonstrate Gottlieb’s significant contribution to the changing face of American art at mid-century. Organized by the Colby College Museum of Art and the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, Inc.

Gary Green: The History of Nature (Part I)
February 7-March 23
Gary Green joins the Colby College Art Department this year as professor of photography. Green’s sensitive images of the common landscape draw connections between human nature and the natural world. His photographs of carved and weathered tree bark, like human skin, tell stories of manmade encounters and natural phenomena. Decaying houses, cleared lots, and bulldozed dirt piles reveal the forces and events that create the history of nature.

Joan Whitney Payson Collection
February 17-June 1
The Colby College Museum of Art presents seven works of art from the Joan Whitney Payson Collection on biennial loan from the Portland Museum of Art. This impressive collection includes paintings by Marc Chagall, Gustave Courbet, Edgar Degas, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Alfred Sisley.

Tradition, Transition, and Modernity
March 25-April 8
These photographs, taken by five Colby students during a trip to China, illustrate the reconfiguration of urban, public spaces there. This was part of a trip led by Associate Professor of East Asian Studies Hong Zhang.

Whistler at Work: The Process of Printmaking
Through June 15
Peter and Paula Lunder have assembled one of the foremost collections of prints by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), comprising more than 200 etchings and lithographs of the highest quality. The latest in a continuing series of exhibitions drawn from this collection not only serves as an overview of Whistler’s printmaking career but also highlights a number of rare examples that reveal Whistler’s working process. Important selections include examples of Whistler’s trial proofs, three pairs of prints that show how the artist developed his images through successive printings from the same plate, and a rare pastel that illuminates how Whistler treated similar subjects in different media. Curated by David P. Becker

currents4: Amy Stacey Curtis
Through April 13
The fourth exhibition in the museum's annual emerging artist series, currents, presents work by Maine-based installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis. Curtis, who has been working in abandoned industrial sites throughout the state for the past seven years, creates interactive works that examine our interconnectedness through themes of chaos, order, and repetition.

The Colby College Museum of Art is open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free and the museum is accessible to people with disabilities. For more information call 859-5600 or visit http://www.colby.edu/museum/.

Image credits:
Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Rhododendrons, Boston Public Gardens, 1899. Watercolor and pencil on paper, 14 1/16 x 20 3/4 inches. The Joan Whitney Payson Collection at the Portland Museum of Art, Maine. Museum purchase with support from Susan Mary Alsop, Robert D. Barton and Nancy Hemenway Barton, Deborah and George Brett, Mrs. Howard S. Cowan, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W.H. Dodge, Leon Gorman, Mrs. Hugh G. Hallward, Austin and Ellen Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. McCorkle, Elizabeth B. Noyce, John G. Ordway, Parker Poe Charitable Trust, Mrs. Jefferson Patterson, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Risley, Phineas W. Sprague Memorial Foundation, Mrs. Nicholas Strekalovsky, Mrs. Stuart Symington, UNUM Charitable Foundation, Friend of the Collection, five anonymous donors, and through funds generated by a gift from the estate of Francis and Marion Libby, 1991.61

William Merritt Chase, Tompkins Park, Brooklyn, 1887. Oil on canvas, 17 3/8 x 22 3/8 inches. Gift of Miss Adeline F. and Miss Caroline R. Wing