October Museum News

October Museum News

Celebration of Culturesomali
Colby Professor of Anthropology Catherine Besteman and photographer Jorge Acero lived in a Somali village called Banta in the late 1980s. Twenty years later, after refugees from that very village arrived in Lewiston, Maine, they encountered Besteman by coincidence. The reunion led to an exhibition of photos and testimonials, compiled by Colby students, documenting their journey. On Sunday, Oct. 5 (2-4 p.m.), Somali Bantus will perform a traditional dance as part of the exhibition's opening reception.

School of Art
The Museum, one of Maine's largest, attracts visitors from all over the state—but it also holds onto its roots as a teaching museum. This semester the Museum is being used in 27 different courses at Colby, exploring everything from contemporary culture and politics to the African diaspora. Educators don't have to teach at Colby to take advantage—the Museum welcomes primary and secondary school groups, too.

Momentum for currents
The Museum's annual exhibition dedicated to the work of an emerging artist with connections to Maine, currents, got some good press in September when Amy Stacey Curtis, last year's solo artist, was the subject of a major article in Port City Life magazine. This year, in an installation by t s Beall, circular, scope-like video sequences of landscape imagery from desolate outposts and contested borderline areas will be projected onto the walls. See below for details about associated events.

Bringing Galleries to LifelivelySpaces
Thirty elementary schoolchildren from the George J. Mitchell School's after-school program graced the Museum's galleries this summer with a Lively Spaces performance. After a seven-week workshop they presented dance, poetry, and skits to an audience of more than 150 parents and other community members.

Games and Guidance
If looking at and discussing art doesn't get your youngsters jazzed up, why not add some games and activities to the mix? The Museum has created a booklet filled with just that—games and activities for children to do in galleries while visiting the exhibitions and at home afterwards. The free booklet is available in the Museum lobby, as is a free self-guided tour booklet for adults.


October Events at the Colby College Museum of Art
For more information, contact the Museum at 859-5600 or museum@colby.edu

Somali Bantu Opening Reception and Dance Performance
Sunday, Oct. 5, 2 p.m.
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Building
This exhibition of photographs taken by Jorge Acero and Colby students explores the stories of members of the Somali Bantu ethnic minority who were forced to flee the civil war in Somalia and have resettled in Lewiston, Maine.

Realms of Faith: Medieval Art
Hugging the Saint: Art and Ritual on the Pilgrimage to Santiago
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
For details and a complete list of events associated with the Realms of Faith exhibition, please visit www.colby.edu/museum.

Currents5 Artist Talk: t s Beall
Thursday, Oct. 9, 4:30 p.m., Room 1, Olin Science Center
Opening reception, 6 p.m., Museum lobby
The fifth installment of currents, the Museum’s annual solo exhibition dedicated to the work of an emerging artist with connections to Maine, presents a new video installation by t s Beall, an American artist living in Glasgow. The exhibition consists of a single watchtower surmounted by a rotating platform outfitted with video projectors.

Rooms with a View
Saturday, Oct. 11, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art and Freshwater Arts, Waterville
This interactive family workshop will begin with a tour of the Museum galleries, focusing on artists' arrangements and depictions of three-dimensional space, followed by a diorama-making workshop at Freshwater Arts. The event, offered in conjunction with Freshwater Arts and Waterville Main Street, is free and open to all ages, but space is limited and preregistration is required. To register, call 680-2055.

Noontime Art Talk
The Somali Bantu Experience: From East Africa to Maine

Thursday, Oct. 16, 12:30 pm
Colby College Museum of Art
Professor of Anthropology Catherine Besteman will speak about this exhibition of photographs taken by Jorge Acero and Colby students. It explores the stories of members of the Somali Bantu ethnic minority who were forced to flee the civil war in Somalia and have resettled in Lewiston, Maine. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people.

Clara M. Southworth Lecture
Liturgy, Legitimacy, Program: The Art Historian in the Virgin Chapel of Beauvais Cathedral

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 7:30 pm,
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Art historian Michael Cothren, professor of art history at Swarthmore College, will begin with an examination of the three stained-glass windows installed during the 1240s in the Virgin Chapel of the Gothic Cathedral of Beauvais. These windows offer no obvious sense of formal unity. Cothren will propose the existence of a unifying theme that binds these windows, but he questions whether he is performing a legitimizing ritual of modernist art history or whether he is opening a window into a 13th-century world which, like ours, conveyed ideas and told stories in pictures rather than words.
 
Noontime Art Talk
The Sacred in Contemporary Art

Thursday Oct. 23, 12:30 p.m.
This talk, in association with the exhibition Realms of Faith: Medieval Art from the Walters Art Museum, features Professor of Art Véronique Plesch. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people. For details and a complete list of events associated with Realms of Faith, please visit http://www.colby.edu/museum.


Ongoing Events

Story Time in the Museum
Saturdays at 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Join Museum docents every Saturday morning for art-related stories, games, and discussion in the Museum's galleries. Story Time in the Museum is free and open to the public, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Guided Museum Tours
Sundays at 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art

Current Exhibitions at the Colby College Museum of Art

The Somali Bantu Experience: From East Africa to Maine
Oct. 2-Nov. 16, 2008
This exhibition of photographs taken by Jorge Acero and Colby students explores the stories of members of the Somali Bantu ethnic minority who were forced to flee the civil war in Somalia, and who have resettled in Lewiston, Maine.

Currents5: t s Beall
Oct. 9, 2008-Feb. 1, 2009
The fifth installment of currents, the Museum’s annual solo exhibition dedicated to the work of an emerging artist with connections to Maine, presents a new video installation by t s Beall, an American artist living in Glasgow. The exhibition consists of a single tower surmounted by a rotating platform outfitted with video projectors. Projecting from this structure onto the walls of the gallery are circular, scope-like video sequences of landscape imagery drawn from desolate outposts and contested borderline areas.

Whistler's Waterscapes: River, Sea, and Canal Views from the Lunder Collection
June 19-Oct. 26, 2008
In its myriad forms, water has symbolized many things throughout history, from the endlessly flowing cycles of life to the hidden depths of the unconscious. This exhibition of prints (and one painting) by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), drawn from the Lunder Collection, highlights this restlessly innovative artist’s response to the theme of water. The works range across his career, from London’s Thames River and the English seacoast to the canals of Venice and Amsterdam. Curated by David P. Becker

Masterpieces of American Folk Art
June 29-Oct. 22, 2008
The statewide Maine Folk Art Trail exhibition provides an opportunity for the Colby College Museum of Art to present 50 objects from its extensive collection of 19th-century works from the American vernacular tradition. Colby’s exhibition comprises works in a variety of media and features important primitive portraits and landscapes from the American Heritage Collection, gift of Edith and Ellerton M. Jetté. For more information about the Maine Folk Art Trail visit www.mainefolkarttrail.com.

Realms of Faith: Medieval Art from the Walters Art Museum
Sept. 7, 2008-January 4, 2009
Drawn from one of the largest and finest medieval art collections in the United States, this exhibition of rare and beautiful objects dating from the sixth to the 15th century focuses on Christian liturgical practices and personal devotion during one of the most fascinating periods in world history. For a complete listing of associated events, please visit www.colby.edu/museum.


Image credits:

Jorge Acero,Somali Bantu photo