Herb Wilson | Tutorial Videos and Flipped Classroom

As a way to increase student engagement, Herb Wilson, Professor of Biosciences, has opted to record his lectures in advance.  This allows students to view the material before class, and then engage in a more active way during class time.  Professor Wilson’s class is taught in Miller 08, an active learning classroom.  This space provides the flexibility for students to work in smaller groups.  Learn more about the Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellowship.

 

 


Denise Bruesewitz | Instructional Videos and Civic Engagement

In Environmental Studies, Assistant Professor Denise Bruesewitz spent a significant portion of her time teaching students how to use different scientific instruments.  To alleviate this pressure, Denise partnered with Academic ITS to create a series of instructional videos on how to properly use the equipment.  Learn more about the Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellowship.

 

 


David Freidenreich | Flipped Classroom

Associate Professor of Jewish Studies, David Freidenreich, saw that his students weren’t coming to class with a command of the material that he expected.  Despite assigning readings, students still didn’t understand the material.  As a result, class time was spent lecturing and explaining, rather than engaging with the content in a way he desired.  Through Colby’s FIT program, David implemented a flipped classroom model, where he would record video lectures for students to watch in advance of class.  Learn more about the Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellowship.

 

 


Michael Donihue | Blended Learning

As a way to maximize classroom time, Professor of Economics, Michael Donihue, created instructional videos for his students to help understand particular concepts.  This allowed students to come to class ready to engage, but also gave them material to reference later on in the course.  Exploring further uses of video, Professor Donihue created custom videos as a way to give individual feedback on student assignments.  Learn more about the Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellowship.

 

 


Ankeney Weitz | Project-Based Learning

When Ankeney Weitz approached her Jan Plan course, Asian Museum Workshop, she was looking for a way to create an online exhibition that allowed students to focus deeply on content without getting caught up in the complexities of web design.  The result was a partnership with Academic ITS to create SomewHERE.  This template-driven WordPress site allowed students to easily drop in images and text, all while maintaining high design standards.  Learn more about the Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellowship.
 

 

 


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Live Audience Response in Google Slides

Looking for more interaction with the students while giving presentations? Now with Google Slides Q&A, you can now transform one-way presentations into a lively conservation with the entire room.  Read more »


Whitney King | Blended Learning

In Spring 2015, Whitney King partnered with Michael Donihue in teaching Joules to Dollars, a course which explored the ways that economics are intertwined with energy science in evaluating renewable and non-renewable energy systems.  Using field work, project-based learning, oral and written presentations, and video tutorials in Excel, Professor King created a rich learning environment for his students.  Learn more about the Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellowship.

 


moodle3.1General updates to Moodle

  • Easier section editing – Change section titles without leaving the page, speeding up your course creation. More about section editing
  • Calendar block – Shows event duration by coloring the beginning and ending date. More about using the Calendar block
  • Recycle bin – Deleted items are now easily recoverable using the Recycle bin. Deleted activities and resources are now collected into a Recycle bin located in the Administration block.new

The Recycle bin is only visible in the Administration block when activities or resources have been deleted from the main course page.

Items in the Recycle bin may be easily restored for a period of 1 month after deletion

Items in the Recycle bin may be permanently deleted before the 1 month period by manually deleting them from the Recycle bin(not recommended)

Recycle bin items are deleted permanently after 1 month automatically 

More about the Recycle Bin

Forums

News forum has been renamed Announcements in new courses. Existing courses remain unchanged.

  • Pin discussions – Inside a Forum activity, a discussion topic can be pinned so that it stays at the top of the list of discussion topics. NOTE: Students do not have permissions to pin posts. Forum posts can be pinned while:

Creating a post – by selecting the Pinned checkbox before posting to the forum

Reading a post – by clicking on the Pin button on any forum post your read

Read more »


Diamond_123

Diamond 123 break-out stations

ITS recently renovated Diamond 123 using a similar technology-enabled active learning layout as was completed in Miller 8 last year. Included are four breakout areas with large monitors for students to work together in groups. Students may connect to the monitors wirelessly to share what is on their computer screens or mobile devices. Up to four connected screens may be displayed on each breakout monitor simultaneously. There is also a ceiling-mounted classroom projector that permits wireless projection connections. Instructions for connecting devices are displayed on the monitors when they power up. The classroom furniture features tables and chairs on casters that may be easily moved from a traditional seminar room arrangement to the various breakout stations.

The purpose of an active learning classroom (ALC) layout is specifically to support a “student-centered, technology-rich learning environment.” While these types of layouts are diverse, all exhibit some similarities. For example, they usually feature seating arrangements where students can face each other rather than an instructor in the front of a room and when these breakout areas are in use, ALCs tend to become louder than typical classrooms as students interact. The installed technology also frequently allows instructors to spotlight individual student or group work.