Plesch Joins Editorial Board of Maine Arts Journal

Professor of Art Véronique Plesch has been invited to join the editorial board of the Maine Arts Journal. Appearing on a quarterly basis, the Maine Arts Journal is the official online publication of the Union of Maine Visual Artists. In addition to writing the introduction to the issues (which she did for the first time in the fall issue as...

2019 Clara M. Southworth Lecture, “Preserving the Gilded Age”

Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 6:00 p.m. Bixler / 178 (Given Auditorium) Please join the Colby College Department of Art in welcoming Patricia Miller, Chief Conservator at the Preservation Society of Newport County, Newport, R.I., who will present a behind-the-scenes look at ongoing efforts to preserve the Society’s eleven historic properties and landscapes – including Hunter House...

Ameri publishes article on Indus Valley iconography in Artibus Asiae

Marta Ameri, assistant professor of Art, has published an article titled, “Variations on a Theme: Iconographic Variability in the Horned Anthropomorphic Figures of the Indus Civilization,” in the most recent issue of Artibus Asiae. The article revisits two of the most distinctive motifs found in the corpus of seals and sealings from the Greater Indus Valley in...

Plesch is guest editor, contributor to Maine Arts Journal: UMVA Quarterly

Professor of Art Véronique Plesch is the guest assistant editor for the Fall 2019 issue of the Maine Arts Journal: UMVA Quarterly. Organized around special themes, the journal features essays by and about artists, interviews, submissions by members of the Union of Maine Visual Artists (UMVA), poetry, UMVA updates about local chapters and current projects, and more. In addition...

Film Screening at Railroad Square Cinema TUNNIIT: RETRACING THE LINES OF INUIT TATTOOS

      Please join us for a film screening of TUNNIIT: RETRACING THE LINES OF INUIT TATTOOS on SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 7:15 p.m. at the Railroad Square Cinema, 17 Railroad Square, Waterville, Maine, 04901. There will be a Q&A with Barry Dana, former chief of the Penobscot Nation, andProfessor of Art Véronique Plesch and...

2019 Faculty Biennial Show on view from September 5-22, 2019

The 2019 Faculty Biennial features recent work by Colby’s teaching artists. This exhibition encompasses the diverse range of media explored by art department faculty members Bradley Borthwick, Bevin Engman, Gary Green, Amanda Lilleston, and Thalassa Raasch.

Mitchell exhibits new work at ICON Contemporary Art in Brunswick, ME

New work by Garry Mitchell, associate professor of art, on view at ICON Contemporary Art in Brunswick, ME. His exhibition “Lost and Found” runs through September 14. ICON Contemporary Art is located at 19 Mason Street, Brunswick, Maine. Gallery hours are weekdays 1-5 p.m. and Saturdays 1-4 p.m.   For more information visit http://www.facebook.com/ICON-Contemporary-Art-212898598761994/.    

Green’s photography chosen for JRNL NO.2, by Fotofilmic

Gary Green, associate professor of art, had his work chosen for JRNL NO. 2, published by Fotofilmic, a gallery and publisher in Vancouver. Green’s work was juried by U.K. photo book publishers Stanley/Barker and will be included in Fotofilmic‘s next photography publication, which will include 11 other artists from all over the world. https://fotofilmic.com/jrnl-fall-2019/

Raasch Faculty Fellow in Art (Photography) joins Art Department

Thalassa Raasch is a French-American artist, educator, and beekeeper based in Portland, Maine. Her practice explores perceptual boundaries, translation and loss. Her research has included blind photography, traditional gravedigging and closed-eye hallucinations. Her work has been exhibited and published nationally as well as internationally. Raasch holds a BA in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard...

Sperling interviewed for article in The Lantern

Marina Takagi ’21, a Colby Art major, interviewed Faculty Fellow in Art Juliet Sperling and wrote an article for The Lantern about Sperling’s research on 19-century moving images titled: Nineteenth-Century Automata and Our visual Culture Today. Click here to read the article.