Education Program


Courses of Study

[ED192]    Sexual Violence Prevention Peer Educator Training Under the direction of the Director of the Gender and Sexual Diversity Program and Associate Director of the Pugh Center, preparation for holding student-led, mandatory Sexual Violence Prevention Training sessions for sophomores next fall. Does not count toward the education majors or minors. Nongraded. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One credit hour.
ED197j    Allyship in Racial Justice Will engage past and present aspects of civil rights and racial justice movement(s) along with federal and state policies affecting racial and ethnic minority groups, particularly AFRICAN Americans, First Nations, and peoples within other postcolonial contexts. Participants will become more informed about the nuanced systems of inequity, more skilled at engaging in constructive cross-cultural dialogue, more organized in their comprehension of systemic inequities and more equipped to participate in social change as Racial Justice Allies. Three credit hours. U. Bonam, Fort
ED201fs    Education and Social Justice An introduction to the relationship between education (theory, research, and practice) and social justice in U.S. schools. Goals include (1) understanding the concept of social justice, the dynamics of power, privilege, and oppression, and how these dynamics shape the experience of students and teachers; (2) developing relationships with children and youth in the greater Waterville area; (3) expanding ethical capacities, including compassion, empathy, respect, responsibility, and commitment to social justice; (4) honing key academic and intellectual skills. In addition, students are required to spend a minimum of 50 civic engagement hours in a local classroom. Four credit hours. S, U. Tappan
ED213f    Schools and Society The complex relationships between schools and society will be examined by reviewing a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical studies. Topics include social mobility and stratification; social reproduction; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; various forms of capital; teaching as a profession; and school choice. Particular attention will be given to the ways that small interactions within educational settings have much larger implications within society. Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing. Four credit hours. U. Howard
ED215f    Children and Adolescents in Schools and Society Explores the lives of contemporary children and adolescents. Goals include (1) understanding how differences in gender, race, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation shape the experience of young people; (2) understanding selected theoretical and empirical work in the field of child and youth studies; (3) developing relationships with local young people; and (4) honing key academic and intellectual skills. In addition, students are required to spend a minimum of 25 civic engagement hours working in a local after-school program. Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing. Four credit hours. S, U. Tappan
ED217s    Education Policy and Reform Explores the fundamentals of how education policy is made and evaluated. Who influences education policy and how? What are the implicit and explicit aims and values shaping education policy and reform? We will focus on contemporary policy issues in American K-12 education, including standardized testing and accountability, school choice, teacher turnover and evaluation, and school takeover. Particular attention will be given to exploring the challenges of using policy to improve education and the implications of contemporary reforms for American democracy. Four credit hours. Yoshizawa
[ED221]    Creating Media for Social Change Explores how to create entertaining and educationally effective digital media for youth (preschool to high school), with an emphasis on socially charged curricular areas such as conflict resolution and cultural tolerance. Through extensive screening of media from around the world, lecture, and discussion, students learn to create their own goal-driven media projects. This will include working in small teams to 1) create a short film as part of a collaboration with an Iraqi youth peace initiative, and 2) develop a multimedia, series treatment that addresses an issue that targets American youth. Three credit hours.
[ED222]    Second Language Pedagogy Listed as East Asian Studies 221. Four credit hours.
ED225j    Teach Freedom Explores the role of education in a free and democratic society which is necessarily concerned with the production of free people capable of developing minds of their own, even as they recognize the importance of learning to live together in association with others. A central goal of education in a democracy is the creation of independent citizens, not "subjects." We will examine how that lofty goal can be approached, and perhaps achieved. Previously offered as Education 297 (Jan Plan 2019). Three credit hours. Ayers
ED228j    Women, Children, Gender, and Human Rights Utilizing the arts and reading widely from fiction, legal cases, and human rights reports to explore the boundaries of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. We will inquire about child survival, children crossing borders, family separations, child protection, health care, education, adoption, and youth in conflict with the law. We will discuss and debate the roles that race, class, gender, ethnicity and sexual identity play in disproportionate arrest, detention and incarceration of young people, in hazardous labor, sexual violence, child marriage and polygamy, and in the pervasive nature of harmful traditional practices. Previously offered as Education 297B (Jan Plan 2019). Three credit hours. Dohrn
ED236j    Indigenous Knowledge(s), Education, And Schooling Takes a socio-cultural, philosophical, and historical approach to Indigenous knowledge(s) along with federal and state policies affecting Indigenous peoples, particularly Native Americans, First Nations, and peoples within other postcolonial contexts. Together, we will engage with indigenous knowledge(s) across time and space, both inside and outside of the formal schooling environment. For example, we will consider how critical pedagogy and culturally responsive curriculum aim to transform practices of schooling that continue to exclude Indigenous knowledge(s) and peoples. This class will also consider how culture and knowledge systems of First Nations and Native Americans have been represented in public spaces like museums. Previously offered as Education 297B (Jan Plan 2020). Three credit hours. Saba
ED237s    Democracy and Education Serves as an introductory examination of the relationship between democracy and education. Many citizens, teachers, and scholars have argued that schools play a central role in maintaining, enhancing, and defending democracy. But are they right? What is democracy? What is the role of schools in a democratic society? What kind of schooling can cultivate effective democratic citizenship? Should promoting democracy be the primary aim of schools? Does the contemporary education system promote or undermine democracy? We will explore these questions and more, working collaboratively to build a critical understanding of democracy, education, and the link between the two. Previously offered as Education 298 (Spring 20-20). Four credit hours. Murray
[ED242]    History and Philosophy of Progressive Education A survey of the historical and philosophical foundations of progressive education. Focuses on the principles of progressive education that have offered an alternative to conventional assumptions about teaching, learning, and schooling for nearly a century. These progressive principles are examined against the backdrop of standardization and mechanization that, more than ever, dominate schools in the United States. Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing. Four credit hours.
[ED243]    Schooling Around the World: Comparative Perspectives Introduces students to interdisciplinary approaches that aim for comparing the emergence, function, and purposes of schooling in diverse national as well as sub-national contexts around the world. Students critically examine global phenomena such as colonialism, modernization, and globalization and their impacts on educational systems and practices. Students also examine contemporary issues such as role of nation state and civil society in education, global education reform movements, dialectic relationship between development and education, and alternative methods of teaching and learning. Previously offered as Education 297 (Fall 2019). Four credit hours. I.
ED245f    Dimensions of Educational Equity Explores the historical and societal roots of educational inequality and efforts to build more equitable schooling systems. We will consider the challenges and tensions involved in defining and pursuing "fairness" and "inclusion" in schools, such as how to acknowledge difference without reifying it, and whether differentiation or standardization of schooling promises greater equity. Finally, we will analyze the potential promise and problems of various contemporary reforms aimed at greater educational equity. Four credit hours. U. Yoshizawa
[ED247]    Current Policy Issues in U.S. Education Provides an overview of contemporary policy issues in American K-12 and higher education. Topics will include standardized testing and accountability policy, achievement gaps, school choice, Common Core and curriculum reform, teacher turnover and evaluation, mayoral control, affirmative action, and college completion, among others. Particular attention will be given to exploring the challenges of using policy to improve education and the implications of contemporary reforms for American democracy. Four credit hours.
ED317s    Boys to Men Listed as Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 317. Four credit hours. U. Tappan
ED322s    Social Class and Schooling The significance of class as a critical dimension of inequality in the United States. Various theoretical, empirical, and pedagogical perspectives on social class and schooling provide a basis for analyzing class stratification in education. Unraveling the cultural dynamics of class distinctions to understand the social, economic, and cultural landscapes within which young people come to understand the meaning of their schooling in a shifting global economy. Prerequisite: Introductory course in education or sociology. Four credit hours. U. Howard
ED324s    Elite Schooling in Global Context Elite schooling plays an important role in helping the most powerful and prestigious social classes within nation states maintain and advance their social position. Particular attention will be given to how elite schools outside the United States are altering curricula to meet demands of the global economy; what students in elite schools are taught about their place and purpose in the global world; how future global and national leaders are being prepared; what links exist between elite schools and changing intersections of class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity; and how elite schools throughout the world unify tradition and innovation. Prerequisite: Education 201, 213, or 215. Four credit hours. I. Howard
ED326s    Collaborative Research in Privilege An intensive reading and discussion course focusing on privilege, this course explores how research is conducted, how data are theorized and analyzed, and how interpretive texts are written. Students will apply theories and methods to collaborate, design, conduct, and present an original research project that contributes to the body of scholarship on privilege. Prerequisite: A course in education or sociology. Four credit hours. I. Howard
ED328f    Politics and Policy of Rural and Urban Education Educational opportunity is unequally distributed across geography. This course will focus on the sociology, history, and politics of rural and urban schools. In doing so, we will critically examine and challenge deficit-based discourses about óruralù and ÿurbaną contexts, and we will consider why place and community are important considerations for education policy. We will discuss policy issues that highlight both what is unique to, and common across, rural and urban contexts, such as school closures, school choice, teacher recruitment and retention. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level education course. Four credit hours. U. Yoshizawa
ED331f    Curriculum and Methods A consideration of various teaching and assessment methods as well as curriculum design for secondary classrooms. Students develop knowledge and skills to meet Maine Standards for Initial Teacher Certification. Students write and present lesson plans, create assessment protocols, develop a coherent unit of study using a backward design model, and conduct and present a research paper on recommended practices for teaching in their certification content area/discipline. Previously listed as Education 431. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a professional certification minor. Four credit hours. Proto
ED343f    Collaborative Research on Trauma and Education Explores how research is conducted in the field of education, focusing specifically on trauma-informed schooling. It will consider how data are collected and analyzed (both qualitatively and quantitatively), and how results are presented to both scholarly and general audiences. Students will collaborate with each other and with faculty to conduct original research on trauma and education. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level course in Education, Psychology, or Sociology. Two credit hours. Brown
ED345s    Reform and the Classroom Examines the school and the classroom as contexts for reform. Why does so much of schooling appear to remain unchanged over time? How and when do external policies and pressures shape what teachers and students do? This course draws on sociological studies of schools and teachersĘ work as well as theories on organizational behavior to build an understanding of the processes, structures, and beliefs that enable or constrain change. We will use this framework to analyze reforms and policies aimed at improving classroom instruction, such as curriculum standards, school restructuring, and teacher evaluation. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level education course. Four credit hours. Yoshizawa
ED351f    Practicum in Education Provides opportunities to serve as assistant teachers, tutor students, work with students individually, observe professional teachers, and prepare and present lesson plans to whole classes in an elementary, middle, or high school. Placement in the Waterville area will be arranged by the professor; students will be responsible for arranging placements in other areas. Nongraded. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One to three credit hours. Tappan
ED351Jj    Practicum in Education Provides opportunities to serve as assistant teachers, tutor students, work with students individually, observe professional teachers, and prepare and present lesson plans to whole classes in an elementary, middle, or high school. Placement in the Waterville area will be arranged by the professor; students will be responsible for arranging placements in other areas. Nongraded. Prerequisite: At least one course in education and sophomore standing. Three credit hours. Proto
[ED357]    Equity and Higher Education Considers issues of social justice, equity, and inclusion as they impact students attending US colleges and universities. The course will focus on theories of student development, critical perspectives on higher education, and the intersection between theory, research, and practice. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level education course. Four credit hours.
ED374Jj    Educating All Learners in Inclusive Classrooms Considers rights of students and responsibilities of educators as they relate both to teaching students who have disabilities as well as to teaching students with other individual learning characteristics. Course topics explore psychological, philosophical, historical, and policy foundations of special education within a critical frame of disability studies. Students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of civic engagement in a classroom that provides accommodations for students with disabilities or other challenges to learning. Prerequisite: Education 201, 213, 215, 245, or 247. Three credit hours. Pariser
[ED397]    Advanced Allyship in Racial Justice This course is designed specifically for students with advanced stamina for active engagement and commitment to solidarity toward racial justice. This advanced level course will support participants to become more skilled at engaging in constructive cross-cultural dialogue, more organized in their comprehension of systemic inequities, and more equipped to participate in sustainable social change as Equity Allies. Defined in part by learning to assert influence through civic engagement, the ethical use of inquiry and accountability, and to appropriate ȯexperienceȺ that is personal. Learners will engage in advanced exercises in introspection, negotiation and reparation. The course will engage past and present aspects of civil rights and racial justice movement(s)along with federal and state Prerequisite: One course in African-American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Education, Latin American Studies, Sociology, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or permission of chair, Mark Tappan at mark.tappan@colby.edu. Three credit hours. U.
ED398s    Disability, Race, and Special Education Students will explore the principles of critical disability studies and DisCrit (Disability Studies in conjunction with Critical Race Theory) to analyze the exclusionary practices, policies and processes of special education for BIPOC students. They will explore the history of race and disability in education as a means to identify intersections of ableism and racism in current discourses around educational inequity, the achievement gap and the school to prison pipeline. Students will then explore best practices for working towards equity and justice for BIPOC students labeled as having a disability in the K-12 educational system. Prerequisite: At least one 200-level education course. Four credit hours. McLaughlin
ED433s    Student Teaching Practicum Students serve as student teachers in a local secondary school, working under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. Students manage classrooms and complete administrative tasks associated with secondary teaching. Education Program faculty members make observations in the classroom and note ways in which the student teachers are progressing toward meeting Maine's Standards for Initial Certification of Teachers as well as the ways in which they are applying the framework of teaching for social justice. Nongraded. Prerequisite: Education 331 and senior standing. Four credit hours. Proto
ED483fj    Honors Project Two to four credit hours. Faculty
ED491f, 492s    Independent Study Independent study of advanced topics and areas of individual interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One to four credit hours. Faculty
ED493f    Senior Seminar in Educational Studies A critical examination of selected topics and issues in the contemporary study of education and human development. The focus will vary from year to year but will typically entail in-depth consideration of the psychological, philosophical, social, cultural, and/or historical dimensions of education and human development. Open only to senior majors and minors in education or human development. Four credit hours. Howard
ED494As    Senior Seminar in Creating Equitable Learning Environments Explores theory and research to identify best practices for creating equitable learning environments for all students at the middle and high school levels. Develops the knowledge and skills to plan and execute lessons that address various learning styles and abilities, incorporate and respect cultural differences, and meet the individual needs of students. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a professional certification minor and concurrent enrollment in Education 433 and 494B. Four credit hours. Proto
ED494Bs    Senior Seminar in Professional Certification Further introduces dimensions of the teaching profession and guides students through the initial teaching certification process. Students will design and complete a professional portfolio that addresses the standards for initial teaching certification. They will analyze and critique artifacts as evidence of competency in teaching. Provides opportunities to further develop an understanding and appreciation of the nature and importance of a reflective approach to teaching. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a professional certification minor and concurrent enrollment in Education 433. Four credit hours. Proto