Greek


Courses of Study

[GK111]    Introductory Greek An introduction to the ancient Greek language as spoken and written at Athens during the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. The first of a two-semester sequence in which students learn to read authors such as Homer, Sophocles, and Plato. Careful attention to grammar, syntax, and vocabulary forms the foundation of the course. Four credit hours.
GK111Jj    Introductory Greek An introduction to the ancient Greek language as spoken and written at Athens during the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. The first of a two-semester sequence in which students learn to read authors such as Homer, Sophocles, and Plato. Careful attention to grammar, syntax, and vocabulary forms the foundation of the course. Three credit hours. Barrett
GK112s    Intermediate Greek The second of a two-semester sequence in which students learn to read the ancient Greek of classical Athens. Careful attention to grammar, syntax, and vocabulary forms the foundation of the course. Prerequisite: Greek 111. Four credit hours. Barrett
GK131f    Introduction to Greek Literature Introduction to reading original ancient Greek texts, coupled with a review of grammar and syntax. Texts vary from year to year and may include poetry and/or prose. Prerequisite: Greek 112. Four credit hours. L. Barrett
[GK235]    Plato: Apology of Socrates In 399 BCE, Socrates was charged with impiety and put on trial. Plato's Apology presents Socrates' defense speech in which he explains himself and his unusual way of life as a lover of wisdom. Attention to philosophical, rhetorical, mythological, and historical contexts. Prerequisite: Greek 131 or equivalent. Four credit hours.
[GK237]    Classical Rhetoric Selected readings from the great speech-writers of ancient Athens such as Demosthenes, Lysias, Isocrates, and Aeschines. Prerequisite: Greek 131 or equivalent. Four credit hours. L.
GK298s    Intermediate Ancient Greek: Herodotus We'll read selections from Herodotus' Histories in Ancient Greek, focusing on grammatical, stylistic, and historical concerns. Herodotus, often called the 'Father of History', composed a gripping narrative of the Persian Wars that wrestles with important questions like: how and why do people differ from one another? Why do such differences often lead to war, and what determines who wins? Herodotus' approach combines history, ethnography, politics, economics, philosophy, and science and gives readers a unique window into the power dynamics and social, cultural, and environmental diversity of the ancient Mediterranean world. Prerequisite: Greek 131 or permission of instructor. Four credit hours. Miller
[GK362]    Sophocles Reading of a selected play from the works of the great Athenian tragic playwright Sophocles. Attention to language, style, staging, use of myth, and historical context, as well as secondary literature. Prerequisite: Greek 131 or equivalent. Four credit hours. L.
GK363f    Euripides Reading of a selected play of Euripides, the ever-controversial provocateur of ancient Greek tragedy. Attention to language, style, staging, use of myth, and historical context, as well as secondary literature. Prerequisite: Greek 131 or equivalent. Four credit hours. L. Barrett
[GK364]    Homer Selected readings from Homer's Iliad or Odyssey, with an eye to grammatical, literary, and historical concerns. Attention to language, meter, use of myth, and historical contexts, as well as secondary literature. Prerequisite: Greek 131 or equivalent. Four credit hours. L.