Chemistry Department


Courses of Study

[CH115]    The Science of Crime Over the last century, science has changed how crime has been committed, investigated, and written about. We study crime, including violent crime, while cultivating writing, critical analysis, and research skills. Frequent short essays explore topics surrounding both true and fictional crimes, including characterization of trace evidence, mechanisms of toxicology, DNA profiling, and ethical responsibilities in the forensic laboratory. Four credit hours. N, W1.
[CH133]    Chemistry of Color and Art Materials A study of the nature of light and how light interacts with matter to produce color. An exploration of the chemical properties of materials that cause color, as well as which analytical techniques probe these properties as applied to artistic materials, such as pigments, dyes, paints, glasses, and ceramics. Prerequisite: A strong background in high school chemistry and physics or an introductory college chemistry course (Chemistry 112, 118, 131, 141, 145, or 147) is strongly recommended. Three credit hours. N.
CH141f    General Chemistry I Fundamental principles of chemistry including atomic theory, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, gas laws, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, and intermolecular forces. Does not assume prior knowledge in chemistry. Students will become proficient at using pre-calculus-level quantitative skills in a scientific context and will master the interface between narrative and mathematical problem solving. The laboratory will familiarize students with experimental techniques and the accumulation and analysis of experimental data. Students with prior credit for Chemistry 145 may not receive credit for Chemistry 141. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Four credit hours. N, Lb. McKinney, Rice
CH142s    General Chemistry II Explores the fundamental principles of chemistry including chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, and radioactivity. Students will become proficient at using pre-calculus-level quantitative skills in a scientific context and will master the interface between narrative and mathematical problem solving. The laboratory will familiarize students with experimental techniques and the accumulation and analysis of experimental data. Students with prior credit for Chemistry 145 may not receive credit for Chemistry 142. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 141. Four credit hours. N, Lb. Conry
CH143f    Turbo Chemistry A recitation section designed to amplify the material covered in General Chemistry lecture with extra challenging homework, practice exams, and required group problem sets. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One credit hour. McKinney
CH144s    Turbo Chemistry A recitation section designed to amplify the material covered in General Chemistry lecture with extra challenging homework, practice exams, and required group problem sets. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One credit hour. McKinney
CH147fs    Comprehensive General Chemistry Introductory chemistry course with content similar to Chemistry 141 and 142 but in a single semester. Suitable for students with strong high school chemistry preparation. Students will become proficient at using pre-calculus-level quantitative skills in a scientific context and mastering the interface between narrative and mathematical problem solving. The laboratory will familiarize students with experimental techniques and the accumulation and analysis of experimental data. Structured to fulfill the general chemistry requirement for medical school and counts as both Chemistry 141 and 142 for course prerequisites. Students with prior credit for Chemistry 131, 141, 142, or 145 cannot receive credit for this course. Previously listed as Chemistry 131. Four credit hours. N, Lb. Conry, Rice
[CH151]    K-8 Chemistry Outreach Activities Development of hands-on activities to fulfill physical science goals required by the Maine Learning Results. Students create age-appropriate science experiments that illustrate the relevance of chemistry to society and implement these activities in area classrooms and on campus. Communication skills are enhanced through the development of teacher kits (written) and interaction with schoolchildren (oral). Lecture only. Prerequisite: Chemistry 112 with laboratory, or 118 with laboratory, or 131, 141, 145, or 147. Three credit hours. N.
[CH176]    Exercise Physiology Listed as Biochemistry 176. Three credit hours. N, Lb.
CH217s    Environmental Chemistry Develops an understanding of how physical, chemical, and biological processes create and define the natural world. Focus is on the fundamental equilibrium and kinetic processes that control global systems, including the composition of the atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere. Building on the concept of residence time and chemical reactivity, students learn how to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic modifications to the environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Current topics such as acid deposition, global warming, atmospheric ozone loss, and the fate and toxicity of heavy metals are discussed in the context of natural environmental processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131, 142, 145, or 147. Four credit hours. McKinney
CH241f    Organic Chemistry I Exploration of the relationships among structure, reactivity, and synthesis of organic compounds. The lecture portion introduces atoms and molecules, orbitals and bonding, the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and other functional groups, stereochemistry, ring systems, substitution and elimination reactions, and kinetics and equilibria. The laboratory involves the use of common techniques used by chemists, instrumentation, and molecular modeling. The goals are to help students think critically, solve problems, and write effectively. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131, 142, 145, or 147. Four credit hours. Thamattoor
CH242s    Organic Chemistry II Theories encountered in Chemistry 141, 142 are used as the basis for a detailed study of the relationships among structure, reactivity, and synthesis of organic compounds. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory. The laboratory explores the use of separation techniques, synthesis, and spectral techniques in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 241. Four credit hours. Katz
[CH255]    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance The theory and practice of one- and two-dimensional NMR, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Examples include complex organic species and biological macromolecules, including proteins. Laboratory exercises include sample preparation and common two-dimensional NMR experiments, including polarization transfer (DEPT), chemical shift correlation (COSY, TOCSY, HMQC, HMBC, Adequate), and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOESY) spectroscopy. Skills developed include the ability to sift through incomplete and sometimes conflicting data to reach a logical conclusion based on available evidence. Offered in alternate January Programs. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 241. Three credit hours.
[CH265]    Green Chemistry Intended to provide students with an introduction to green chemistry, not a specific field of its own, but instead a broad philosophy urging the reduction or elimination of the use or generation of hazardous substances in chemical design, manufacturing, and application. Students will examine the principles of green chemistry used on the research and industrial scales, after gaining a general background in toxicology, ecology, and the historical context that led to the search for safer chemicals and methods. Previously offered as Chemistry 297 (2014). Prerequisite: Chemistry 241. Three credit hours.
CH278s    Joules to Dollars Listed as Economics 278. Four credit hours. N. Donihue, King
CH331f    Chemical Methods of Analysis A study of the fundamentals of analytical chemistry. Students learn how to use physical measurements to make quantitative chemical measurements reported with defined uncertainties. Concepts of chemical mass and charge balance are used to calculate chemical speciation in complex acid/base and redox systems. Lectures and homework focus on problem-solving skills that provide solutions to new problems based on fundamental chemical principles and constants. The required laboratory introduces advanced volumetric, potentiometric, and spectroscopic techniques for quantitative chemical analysis. Written lab reports reinforce the technical writing style used in chemical communications. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131, 142, 145, or 147. Four credit hours. King, McKinney
CH332s    Instrumental Methods of Analysis Instruction in instrumental methods, including modern electroanalytical methods, absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatography. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 331. Chemistry 342 is recommended. Four credit hours. King
CH341f    Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics The laws and theories of chemical reactivity and the physical properties of matter. Emphasis is placed on chemical equilibrium, molecular bonding, and the rates of chemical reactions. Major topics: thermodynamics, solutions, and reaction kinetics. Gaining facility with abstraction through building mathematical models, working through the implications of those models, and assessing the validity and inherent errors in the ability of the models to predict and explain physical phenomena are the primary goals. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131, 142, 145, or 147; Mathematics 122 or 162; and Physics 145. Chemistry 342 may be taken before 341 with permission of the instructor. Five credit hours. Drozd
CH342s    Physical Chemistry: Quantum and Statistical Mechanics The laws and theories of chemical reactivity and the physical properties of matter. Emphasis is placed on chemical equilibrium, molecular bonding, and the rates of chemical reactions. Major topics: quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Gaining facility with abstraction through building mathematical models, working through the implications of those models, and assessing the validity and inherent errors in the ability of the models to predict and explain physical phenomena are the primary goals. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 341. 342 may be taken before 341 with permission of instructor. Five credit hours. Drozd
CH362f    Medical Biochemistry Listed as Biochemistry 362. Four credit hours. Moloney
CH367f    Biochemistry of the Cell I Listed as Biochemistry 367. Four or five credit hours. Rice
CH368s    Biochemistry of the Cell II Listed as Biochemistry 368. Four or five credit hours. Rice
CH378s    Molecular Biology Listed as Biochemistry 378. Four credit hours. Instructor
CH411f    Inorganic Chemistry Current models and concepts in inorganic chemistry are discussed, with an emphasis on general trends and periodic properties of the chemical elements and their compounds. Topics include bonding and structure, acid-base theories, redox properties, molecular symmetry, and coordination compounds. Students will expand their knowledge of fundamental chemical principles as well as their ability to critically think about, communicate, and apply this knowledge in problem solving. Lecture only. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131, 142, 145, or 147 and junior or higher standing. Chemistry 342 is recommended. Three credit hours. Conry
[CH413]    Inorganic Laboratory Studies Synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds of both the representative and transition elements. Discussion and laboratory. Co-requisite: Chemistry 411. Two credit hours.
CH431s    Mechanistic Organic Chemistry Based on original research articles and designed to teach students to think critically about published material. The readings cover topics such as chemical bonding, molecular orbital theory, and aromaticity, the use of isotopes in determining reaction mechanisms, reactions of atomic carbon, matrix isolation spectroscopy, laser flash photolysis, the influence of structure on reactivity, the role of thermodynamics and kinetics in reactions, linear free energy relationships, and unusual molecules. Students are instructed on computational modeling of chemical reactions, structures, and spectroscopic properties and are taught to retrieve information from the chemical literature. Four credit hours. Thamattoor
[CH432]    Advanced Organic Chemistry The logic and methods of organic synthesis are explored. The elementary organic reactions studied in Chemistry 241, 242 are augmented and used in the synthesis of biologically and chemically important molecules. Lecture only. Prerequisite: Chemistry 242 or equivalent. Four credit hours.
[CH434]    Symmetry and Spectroscopy Use of principles of symmetry and group theory as an aid in understanding chemical bonding, interpreting molecular vibrational and electronic spectroscopy, and rationalizing symmetry control of reactions. Lecture only. Prerequisite: Chemistry 411. Four credit hours.
[CH444]    Advanced Methods in Biochemistry A detailed look at current trends in experimental research at the interface of chemistry and biology. Critical analyses of recent literature, identification of important problems in the field, and development of proposals to address these problems will be of primary focus. Problem-solving assessments will include both written and oral communication skills. Topics will include proteomics, chemical biology, and advanced enzymology. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 367 and 368 (the latter may be taken concurrently), and a W1 course. Four credit hours. W3.
[CH481f, 482s]    Special Topics in Environmental Chemistry Primarily a laboratory course with emphasis on independent studies of environmentally related topics. A paper and oral presentation are required. Prerequisite: Chemistry 217 and permission of the department. One to three credit hours.
CH483f, 484s    Honors in Research in Chemistry Laboratory and library work involving a senior and one or more chemistry faculty members on a clearly defined project that results in an honors thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of the department and recommendation of the faculty sponsor. One to four credit hours. Faculty
CH491f, 492s    Independent Study Laboratory work of a research nature may be arranged with the instructor. One to four credit hours. Faculty
CH493f, 494s    Senior Seminar Discussion of topics of current interest in all areas of chemistry. Presentations by invited speakers from other colleges, universities, and industry. Seniors give a presentation on their research each semester. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing as a chemistry major. One credit hour. King