German Department


Courses of Study

GM125f    Elementary German I Introductory course for students with little or no previous knowledge of German. Development of all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Communicative and interactive acquisition of grammar and vocabulary via study of contemporary life in the German-speaking countries. Audiovisual materials and integrated multimedia accompany textbook instruction. Four credit hours. Bradley
GM126s    Elementary German II Continuation of Elementary German I to further develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Communicative and interactive acquisition of grammar and vocabulary via study of contemporary life in the German-speaking countries. Audiovisual materials accompany textbook instruction and integrated multimedia. Prerequisite: German 125 or appropriate score on the German placement exam. Four credit hours. Bradley
GM127f    Intermediate German I: Structures in Cultural Contexts Grammar review at the intermediate level with continued practice of speaking and listening skills, readings and interactive communication based on topics from German culture and literature, emphasis on practical uses of the language. First introduction to extended readings and writings in German via cultural contexts. Prerequisite: German 126 or appropriate score on the German placement exam. Four credit hours. Ellis
GM128s    Intermediate German II: Readings in Cultural Contexts Continuation of Intermediate German I. Practice and review of written and oral communication skills emphasizing formation of correct, idiomatic structures. Strives to build reading skills and to introduce a variety of cultural ideas and contexts through selection of literary and cultural readings/viewings in German. Preparation for transition to in-depth study in a variety of areas of German studies. Prerequisite: German 127 or appropriate score on the German placement exam. Four credit hours. Ellis
GM129f    Conversation Group Review and practice for students at the intermediate level. A selection of written, visual, and audio German language and culture sources will provide the basis for discussion and conversation. Conducted in German. Does not count toward the language requirement or the German major and minor. May be repeated for credit. Nongraded. Prerequisite: German 126. One credit hour. Pimpi
GM130s    Conversation Group Review and practice for students at the intermediate level. A selection of written, visual, and audio German language and culture sources will provide the basis for discussion and conversation. Conducted in German. Does not count toward the language requirement or the German major and minor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: German 127 or, with permission, concurrent enrollment in German 126. Nongraded. One credit hour. Pimpi
[GM151]    Dungeons and Dragons: The Middle Ages in German Literature (in English) A selection of readings from the Middle Ages to the present. Particular focus on representations of medieval popular topics such as knightly adventures, magic, and voyaging, as well as changing cultural notions of class, gender, and love. Poetry and prose readings, alongside selections of popular operatic and filmic adaptations. Conducted in English. Three credit hours. L.
[GM231]    Introduction to German Studies This first course beyond the language sequence continues the emphasis on composition and conversation, as well as on oral presentations of research. Introduction to German studies through examination of social and historical developments from the age of Luther to Germany's unification in 1990 as reflected in literature, art, politics, and philosophy. Emphasis on analysis of aesthetic and intellectual accomplishments representative of major periods in German, Austrian, and Swiss history. May be repeated once for additional credit. Prerequisite: German 128. Four credit hours.
GM234f    German Culture through Film An introduction and exploration of German culture through analysis of German-language cinema from its inception in the 1890s through the post-unified cinema of the present. Focus of popular and avant-garde films and notions of mass culture, education, propaganda, entertainment, and identity formation. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: German 128. Four credit hours. Bradley
GM236s    ConTexts in German Culture Introduction to critical analysis of select genres from German, Austrian, and Swiss cultures. Topics vary but through deepening of close reading skills of written, performed, and visual texts, this course examines socio-historical moments in their relationship to key notions and genres, including women writers, identity and crisis, comedy, fairy tales, and the canon. Focus continues on composition and conversation with development of critical, written, and interpretive analysis, and student presentations. Prerequisite: German 128 or equivalent. Four credit hours. Bradley
[GM237]    The German Fairy Tale in Popular Culture (in English) Fairy tales permeate our culture on every level. Examines the role of the fairy tale (folktales, romantic variations, and Disney versions alike) in the construction of culture along with their adaptations in the media, comics, literature, art, and film. In analyzing the historical and social development of fairy tales as a genre, students are introduced to methods of literary analysis and cultural criticism. This humanities lab requires students to work with fourth grade students at Mount Merici Academy. Counts toward the German major or minor. Open to first-year students. Conducted in English. Four credit hours. L.
GM252j    Mission Impossible: Multicultural German Literature and Film (inEnglish) Introduction to German-speaking literature and film by writers and filmmakers of African (Ayim, Oguntoye), Japanese (Tawada), Jewish (Celan, Honigmann), Romanian (Müller, Wagner), Russian (Kaminer), and Turkish (Özdamar, Zaimoglu, Akin) backgrounds. Emphasis on contemporary literature, with background readings from the Enlightenment through the present. Examination of creative approaches to issues of migration, exile, and globalization, with focus on language politics, identity formation, gender, history and memory, and the multicultural city. Counts toward the German major or minor. Open to first-year students. Conducted in English. Three credit hours. L, I. A. Koch
GM263s    Weird Fictions (in English) This reading- and writing-intensive seminar considers the construction of the genre of science fiction (broadly defined). We will read short prose and novels from the 19th century to the present by authors such as ETA Hoffmann, Patrick Süskind, and Franz Kafka, and we will view films of Fritz Lang, F.W. Murnau, and others. In addition we will read texts that function as hybrid and complementary permutations of science fiction such as magical realism, speculative fiction, and utopian/dystopian fictions. Conducted in English. Four credit hours. L. Ellis
[GM298]    Environmental Humanities in German Studies (in English) This seminar will focus on conceptions of the natural world and on the relationship of human beings to the Earth in German literature and philosophy from the Enlightenment to the present. Our readings will consist of literary works (prose and poetry) and philosophical writings by well-known authors such as Goethe, Rilke, and Kafka, as well as less commonly-read and contemporary authors connected to the German tradition. Units will include: German Romantic philosophies of nature, narratives of industrialization, other-than-human consciousnesses, and the reemergence of Romantic thought in contemporary eco-philosophy. Conducted in English. Four credit hours. L.
GM329f    Current Topics An informal weekly meeting for students at the advanced level for conversation practice. Source materials include newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary German film, television broadcasts, and podcasts, along with other media. Conducted in German. Does not count toward the language requirement or the German major or minor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: German 128. Nongraded. One credit hour. Pimpi
GM330s    Current Topics An informal weekly meeting for students at the advanced level for conversation practice. Source materials include newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary German film, television broadcasts and podcasts, along with other media. Conducted in German. Does not count toward the language requirement or the German major or minor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A 200-level German course. Nongraded. One credit hour. Pimpi
GM342f    Contested Subjects in German Culture Introduction to critical analysis of contested subjects in German and German-speaking cultures. While topics vary, this course will refine close reading skills of written and visual texts, including poetry, works of art, drama, short stories, prose, and film that focus on culturally contested topics. Focus on critical, written and interpretive analysis, student presentations, and exposure to relevant cultural, theoretical, and historical sources. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: A 200-level German course. Four credit hours. Bradley
[GM368]    Sex, Madness, and Transgression A selection of texts from the Age of Goethe through the present, each prominently featuring the representation of acts of transgression: social, mental, or sexual. One of our guiding questions will therefore be how and for what purpose literature deals with cultural, political, and sexual norms and deviations. Texts include Büchner's Woyzeck, Schnitzler's Reigen, Dürrenmatt's Das Versprechen, Böll's Katharina Blum, and Jelinek's Die Klavierspielerin, as well as a number of theoretical sources. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: A 200-level German course. Four credit hours. L.
GM491f, 492s    Independent Study Individual projects in areas where the student has demonstrated the interest and competence necessary for independent work. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Two to four credit hours. Faculty
GM493s    Seminar: Ideologies and Identities Critically assesses ways German art and culture engage with ideologies and questions of personal, cultural, and political concepts of identity. Among key ideas, the persistent "German question," along with notions of Heimat, regional and transnational belonging, gender, language politics, class, race. Discussions based on representative readings (poetry, prose, and drama), forms of artistic expression (music, visual art, and film), theory and secondary literature from the Enlightenment through the present-day Berlin Republic. Students write weekly response papers and short critical essays, participate in a writing workshop, complete a final research paper in German, and present research findings in a public symposium. Prerequisite: A 300-level German course and senior standing. Four credit hours. L. Ellis