Biology Department


The Biology Department ensures that students gain exposure to the breadth of biological science and become proficient in the methods of scientific inquiry. The curriculum emphasizes the study of plants, animals, and microorganisms from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Through laboratory and field experiences and the opportunity to carry out original research, students gain proficiency in gathering, interpreting, and communicating scientific knowledge. Department graduates continue their education in all fields of biology and in professional schools, and they pursue careers in scientific research, biotechnology, education, agriculture, medicine, and public health.

To promote interdisciplinary education, the Biology Department maintains close ties (often including cross-listed courses) with other departments and programs including Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Studies, Geology, and Psychology, and with external partners including the Jackson Laboratory, the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, and the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.

Three optional concentrations and an interdisciplinary option are offered in addition to the basic major.

The concentration in ecology and evolution is designed to provide students with a background to work in ecology, evolutionary biology, or related disciplines. Recent graduates in this area have enrolled in masters’ and doctoral programs in ecology, evolution, marine biology, and natural resource management. Others are employed by federal and state agencies, private and public organizations, and consulting firms.

The concentration in cell and molecular biology/biochemistry focuses on the interdisciplinary field at the interface between biology and chemistry and also prepares students for graduate study or employment in the biomedical fields. Recent graduates have pursued interests in biomedical research, genomics, and molecular biology; others have attended medical school or graduate school in various disciplines.

The concentration in neuroscience allows students to explore the interdisciplinary field at the interface between biology and psychology. This program prepares students for graduate study or employment in neuroscience or biomedical fields. Recent graduates have pursued research in neurodegenerative diseases, molecular neuroscience, and neuroimmunology.

The major in computational biology allows students to develop a coherent plan for the integration of computer science with biology, culminating in an integrative capstone experience. Students completing this major will be well prepared to obtain employment or pursue research in fields such as computational biology and bioinformatics.

Students interested in teaching are urged to read the “Education” section of the catalogue and to contact a member of the Education Program. Students majoring in biology and preparing for dental, medical, veterinary, or other health professions must carefully plan how to fit prerequisite courses in other disciplines into their course of study. Students interested in health professions should, in addition to working closely with their major advisor, consult regularly with the health professions advisor in the Career Center.

Faculty

Chair, Associate Professor Lynn Hannum
Associate Chair, Associate Professor David Angelini
Professors Catherine Bevier, Frank Fekete, Russell Johnson, and Judy Stone.; Associate Professors Syed Tariq Ahmad, David Angelini, Lynn Hannum, Ronald Peck, and Andrea Tilden; Assistant Professors Allison Barner, Christina Cota, Joshua Martin, Christopher Moore, and Suegene Noh; Visiting Assistant Professors Susan Childers, Thomas Klepach, and Johanna van Oers; Senior Laboratory Instructors Tina Beachy, Scott Guay and Sarah Staffiere; Laboratory Instructors I Lyndell Bade, April Chiriboga, and Serena Graham; Research Scientists Paul Berkner, Bets Brown, Susan Childers, Phillip de Maynadier, William Feero, Josh Kavaler, and Ross Zafonte; Research Associates Louis Bevier and Brenda Fekete


Requirements +

General Requirements for All Major Programs (Except Computational Biology)

For all major programs offered by the department, the point scale for retention of the major applies to all courses required for the major and all elected biology courses. Courses required for the major may not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. At least 32 credit hours must be taken for the major, including at least six courses with a laboratory component and at least two courses at the 300 level or above. A maximum of four credit hours of independent study and two credit hours of seminar may be counted toward the major. No more than eight credit hours in a semester or 12 credit hours in total from off-campus study programs may be counted toward the major requirements. The academic honor of “Distinction in the Major” will be awarded to students who have an average of at least 3.5 in the biology major.

Requirements for the Basic Major in Biology

Thirty-one hours of course work in biology (excluding Advanced Placement credit), including Biology 163, 164, one course with laboratory in field biology (Biology 211, 237, 271, 277, 334, 358J), and one course with laboratory in cellular biology (Biology 225, 227, 248, 274, 279, 332, 367). Seniors must enroll in Biology 401 or 402. In addition, Chemistry 141, 142, or Chemistry 121, 122 or Chemistry 147; Mathematics 121 or 161 or equivalent; and one of the following courses: Computer Science 15X, Mathematics 122, 162, 253, Statistics 212.

Requirements for the Concentration in Ecology and Evolution

Thirty-one hours of coursework in biology (excluding Advanced Placement credit), including Biology 163, 164, 271, 320, and 328 or 382; one organismal or taxonomy-based biology course with lab (Biology 211, 237, 248, 276, 277, 334); and one course with laboratory in cellular biology (Biology 225, 227, 248, 274, 279, 332, 367). Seniors must enroll in Biology 401 or 402. In addition, Chemistry 141, 142, or Chemistry 121,122 or Chemistry 147; Mathematics 121 or 161 or equivalent, and Statistics 212.

Requirements for the Concentration in Cell and Molecular Biology/Biochemistry

Thirty-one hours of course work in biology (excluding Advanced Placement credit), including Biology 163, 164, 279, 367 (with laboratory), 368 (with laboratory), 378; one course with laboratory in field biology (Biology 211, 237, 271, 277, 334, 358J); and one cell or molecular-level biology course (Biology 214, 225, 227, 246, 247, 248, 278, 329, 332, 351, 371). Seniors must enroll in Biology 401 or 402. In addition, Chemistry 141, 142 (or 121, 122 or 147), 241, 242; Physics 141 and 145;  Mathematics 121 or 161 or equivalent; and one of the following courses: Computer Science 15X, Mathematics 122, 162, 253, or Statistics 212.

Requirements for the Concentration in Neuroscience

Thirty-one hours of course work in biology (excluding Advanced Placement credit), including Biology 163, 164, 274; one course with laboratory in field biology (Biology 211, 237, 271, 277, 334 358J); and at least two of the following courses: 225, 227, 275, 278, 279, 373, 374. Seniors must enroll in Biology 401 or 402. In addition, Chemistry 141, 142, or Chemistry 121,122 or Chemistry 147; Mathematics 121 or 161 or equivalent and one of the following courses: Computer Science 15X, Mathematics 122, 162, 253, or Statistics 212; Psychology 111; one course from the following: Psychology 232, 233, 242, 244, 272, 352, 374 (this list is frequently updated as new courses are introduced; please contact your advisor if you have questions about a specific course); and one elective course in psychology (200-level or above).

Requirements for the Major in Computational Biology

Students will design an integrative course of study in consultation with an academic advisor(s). Foundational courses (may be satisfied by AP or other placement exams): Biology 163 and 164; Computer Science 151, 152 or 153; and Mathematics 122. Required core courses: Biology 278 and 279; Computer Science 231 and 251 or 252; and Mathematics 253 or 262 and Statistics 212. Four elective courses at the 300-level or above should be chosen in consultation with an advisor two each from Biology and Computer Science. Recommended courses include Biology 320, 345, 371J, 382 and Computer Science 341+441 or 343+443 or 346+446.

Honors Program in Biology

Biology majors with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.5 at the end of the January term of the junior year or with permission of the department are eligible to apply for the Biology Honors Research Program during spring registration of the junior year. Honors research projects will earn a total of seven to nine credits and will be conducted during each semester of the senior year (and may include Jan Plan). Completion of the honors program will include a written thesis, an oral presentation at the Colby Liberal Arts Symposium, and successful completion of an oral examination given by the student’s honors committee. Successful completion of the honors program will result in the degree being awarded with “Honors in Biology.”