Global Studies Program


Requirements

Requirements for the Major in Global Studies

Up to 14 courses, including the five courses that constitute the core curriculum; three courses focusing on cultures and places; three courses related to themes in global studies; and one senior seminar or appropriate independent study (Global Studies 491 or 492). The senior seminar or senior project must be completed during the senior year as the capstone experience. Majors must complete a concentration within the major unless they have a double major or minor in anthropology, Chinese, East Asian studies, economics, environmental studies, French studies, German studies, government, history, Italian, Japanese, Latin American studies, Russian, or Spanish. Majors also must complete the equivalent of two courses beyond the introductory (usually through 131) level in a modern foreign language. Students are encouraged to develop language skills relevant to their regional specialization. At least one semester of foreign study is required, although under exceptional circumstances students with extensive overseas experience can petition the director and the advisory committee to be exempted. A student must receive a grade of C- or better for a course to count toward the major. No courses listed for the major may be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Note: Students must have at least a 2.7 grade point average by the end of the sophomore year to be eligible for foreign study. Students who do not meet this minimum requirement will not be able to retain their global studies major.

Note to junior transfer students: The College requires that all students spend at least four semesters in residence at Colby. Therefore, to satisfy the semester-abroad requirement for the major, junior transfer students must either stay for a fifth semester or enroll in a summer study-abroad program for at least nine credits (unless the study-abroad requirement has been met in some other way).

Courses Composing the Core Curriculum

Anthropology 112, Economics 133 and 134, Government 131, and History 276.

Courses Approved to Fulfill the Cultures and Places Component

Note that (a) at least two courses must be drawn from the same regional grouping and one course from a different region, and (b) courses must be drawn from at least two disciplines.

Africa:

Anthropology

  • 237 Ethnographies of Africa
  • 341 Culture, Mobility, Identity: Encounters in the African Diaspora

French

  • 238 Introduction to the Francophone World: Africa
  • 361 Francophone Cultures and Literatures of the Indian Ocean

Government

  • 255 African Politics
  • 336 Politics of Development in Africa
  • 3XXB Field Study in African Development

History

  • 364 Environmental and Health History in Africa

Asia:

Anthropology

  • 339 Asian Pacific Modernities

East Asian Studies

  • 231 The Chinese Novel: Vignettes of Life in Imperial China
  • 240 Japanese Animation: Sensitivity to Differences
  • 251 Gender Politics in Chinese Drama and Film
  • 252 Hell on Earth? Chinese Writers on Modern Chinese Society
  • 261 Japanese Language and Culture
  • 268 Politics of Satire and Humor in Modern China
  • 277 Culture of Cuteness: Japanese Women
  • 278 Language and Gender
  • 332 Masterpieces: Modern Japanese Novels
  • 353 Globalization and Human Rights in China

Economics

  • EC279  Economic Rise and Future of China

Government

  • 256 Conflict in East Asia
  • 355 Winners and Losers in Chinese Politics
  • 356 Winners and Losers in Japanese Politics

History

  • 250 History of Modern China
  • 352 Asian Migrations
  • 373 Religion and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Asian History

Japanese

  • 432 Contemporary Japanese Novel

Religious Studies

  • 117 Passage to India: India and the Western Imagination
  • 211 Religions of India
  • 212 Religions of China, Japan, and Tibet
  • 312 South Asian Women at the Crossroads: Tradition and Modernity
  • 317 Sikhism: Scripture, Sacred Music, and Art
  • 319 Bollywood and Beyond: South Asian Religions Through Film

Europe and Russia:

French

  • 232 French Cultural History I
  • 233 French Cultural History II
  • 236 Introduction to the Francophone World: The Americas
  • 238 Introduction to the Francophone World: Africa
  • 252 Provocative Texts: Engaging the World
  • 332 Voices of Dissent in Early Modern France
  • 343 Decoding French and Francophone News
  • 351 Minority Issues and Social Change in Francophone North America
  • 354 Parisian Encounters: Great Loves, Grand Passions
  • 358 Passionate Discontent: The 19th-Century Epidemic
  • 371 L’écriture de Soi
  • 378 French Revolution: Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death
  • 392 French Intellectuals and the Struggle for Social Change
  • 493 Seminar (when appropriate)

German

  • 231 Introduction to German Studies
  • 234 German Culture through Film
  • 237 The German Fairy Tale in Popular Culture
  • 298 Dark and Grimm Fairy Tales
  • 368 Sex, Madness, and Transgression
  • 397 Literary Adaptation

Global Studies

  • 451 Justice and Injustice in Global Europe


Government

  • 243 Politics of Subnational Culture and Identity in Europe
  • 259 European Politics
  • 266 German Politics
  • 354 The European Union
  • 359 Political Ideologies and Revolutionary Movements in Europe

History

  • 112 A Survey of Modern Europe
  • 224 Germany and Europe, 1871-1945
  • 227 The Russian Empire: Russia Looks to the West, 1613-1905
  • 228 The Russian Empire: Soviet History and 20th-Century Revolutions
  • 321 The First World War
  • 318 Enlightenment and French Revolution
  • 322 Europe and the Second World War
  • 327 Daily Life Under Stalin
  • 397 Russia’s Intellectual Outlaws: The Intelligentsia
  • 421 Debating the Nazi Past
  • 445 Nuclear Madness
  • 498 Research Seminar: Stalinism

Italian

  • 262 Outsiders, Losers, Rejects: Topics in Italian Cultural Studies
  • 397 Italian Food in Practice: A Hands-on Cultural History

Religious Studies

  • 258 Religion and Literature in Modern Ireland

Russian

  • 231 The Russian Novel: Interrogations (in English)
  • 232 Engineering Human Souls: Stalinist Culture (in English)
  • 237 Gamblers, Madmen, and Murderers
  • 346 Russian Poetry
  • 425 20th-Century Short Works
  • 426 The 19th-Century Russian Novel
  • 427 Re-Imaging Russia: Cinema and Russian Society 1986-2009
  • 428 The 20th-Century Russian Novel

Spanish

  • 266 Language of Spanish Cinema
  • 351 Ideology and Ethics in Spanish Golden Age Literature
  • 371 The Colonial Experience: European and Amerindian Responses
  • 397 Spanish Female Writers: Gender, Power, and the Construction of Nationhood

Latin America:

Anthropology

  • 231 Caribbean Cultures

Economics

  • 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary Latin America

French

  •  236 Introduction to the Francophone World: The Americas

Government

  • 253 Latin American Politics
  • 264 Challenges to Democracy in Latin America
  • 335 United States-Latin American Relations
  • 364 Challenges to Democracy in Latin America

Latin American Studies

  • 173 History of Latin America
  • 174 Introduction to Latin American Studies
  • 275 Strongmen and Populism in Modern Spain and Latin America
  • 277 History of the Maya from 200 B.C.
  • 373 History of Religion and Unbelief in Latin America
  • 473 Seminar: Historical Roots of Violence in Modern Latin America

Spanish

  • 265 The Short Novel in Spanish America
  • 266 Language of Spanish Cinema
  • 273 Contemporary Spanish-American Short Story
  • 354 Detectives and Spies: Forms of Popular Culture in Spanish-American Fiction
  • 371 The Colonial Experience: European and Amerindian Responses

The Middle East:

Anthropology

  • 246 Engaging Muslim Worlds
  • 264 China in Transition: An Anthropological Account

Government

  • 251 Israelis and Palestinians: Conflict and Accommodation
  • 252 Politics of the Middle East
  • 358 Comparative Arab Politics

History

  • 184 History of the Modern Middle East
  • 283 Golden Diaspora: Modern Jewish History
  • 285 Foundation of Islam
  • 381 Women and Gender in Islam
  • 389 History of Iran

Religious Studies

  • 182 Jews and Judaism in the Modern World

Courses Approved to Fulfill the Theme Component

Courses must be drawn from at least two different disciplines.

Anthropology

  • 236 Illegal Drugs, Law, and the State
  • 244 Anthropology of Religion
  • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
  • 258 Anthropology, History, Memory
  • 373 The Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality
  • 374 Public Anthropology
  • 464 Anthropology of Food
  • 498 Anthropology of Creativity

Economics

  • 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary Latin America
  • 271 International Economic Integration
  • 273 Economics of Globalization
  • 297J Policy and Methods in Global Development
  • 335 Topics in Economic Development
  • 373 Open-Economy Macroeconomics
  • 378 International Trade
  • 471 Multinational Corporations

Environmental Studies

  • 234 International Environmental Policy
  • 297C Climate Change Policy
  • 298 Our Earth: Governing the Commons
  • 346 Global Food Policy
  • 347 Tropical Forests and Rural Livelihoods
  • 366 The Environment and Human Health

Global Studies

  • 211 Human Rights and Social Justice in Global Perspective
  • 352 Global Activism: From Socialist Internationalism to Occupy
  • 437 Media, Culture, and the Political Imagination
  • 451 Justice and Injustice in Global Europe

Government

  • 211 Capitalism and Its Critics
  • 231 U.S. Foreign Policy: The Cold War
  • 238 Politics of War Crime Tribunals
  • 251 Israelis and Palestinians: Conflict and Accommodation
  • 263 Democracy Assistance
  • 264 Challenges to Democracy in Latin America
  • 332 International Organization
  • 335 United States-Latin American Relations
  • 336 Politics of Development in Africa
  • 344 Post-Communist Transformations
  • 354 The European Union
  • 357 Political Economy of Regionalism
  • 359 Political Ideologies and Revolutionary Movements in Europe
  • 432 U.S. Foreign Policy
  • 435 Memory and Politics
  • 451 Political Violence
  • 454 Politics of Development: State, Society, and Markets

History

  • 321 The First World War
  • 322 Europe and the Second World War
  • 325 Prisoners of War and the Civilian Internees in the 20th Century
  • 352 Asian Migrations
  • 364 Environmental and Health History of Africa
  • 381 Women and Gender in Islam
  • 394 Ecological History
  • 446 Global Health History
  • 447 The Cold War

Courses Approved to Fulfill the Seminar Requirement

*Note: The student must submit a copy of the title page of the seminar paper signed by the instructor to demonstrate appropriateness for concentrations.

Anthropology

  • 462 Global Mobilities: Movements, Modernities, Citizenships
  • 474 Anthropology as Public Engagement

Chinese

  • CN450 Chinese Short Stories

East Asian Studies

  • 493 Advanced Research in East Asia

Economics

  • 471 Multinational Corporations
  • 477 Currency, Banking, and Debt Crises

Environmental Studies

  • 493 Environmental Policy Practicum (if topic is appropriate*)


Global Studies

  • 437 Media, Culture, and the Political Imagination
  • 451 Justice and Injustice in Global Europe

Government

  • 432 U.S. Foreign Policy
  • 435 Memory and Politics
  • 451 Political Violence
  • 454 Politics of Development: State, Society, and Markets

History

  • 414 History of Fear in Europe
  • 421 Debating the Nazi Past
  • 445 Nuclear Madness
  • 446 Global Health History
  • 447 The Cold War
  • 461 History and Development of Islamic law
  • 472 Daily Life Under Khrushchev

Latin American Studies

  • 473 Historical Roots of Violence in Modern Latin America

Languages

  • Senior-level seminar (if topic is appropriate*)

Note: Students can petition the director of the program to count a seminar-style 200- or 300-level course toward the seminar requirement. In such cases, students also will be expected to enroll in Global Studies 491 or 492 (for two credits) to complete an original research paper. Approval of this option is at the discretion of the instructor and the advisory committee. Students may also pursue a four-credit independent research project (Global Studies 491 or 492) to fulfill the senior requirement.

Note: Some courses are listed under two or three categories; with the exception of counting courses toward the concentration or a second major (if students have a relevant double major or minor [see above]), no single course can be used to satisfy more than one requirement. A minor must have four freestanding courses not required for the major. Students may petition to include other courses if the course has a substantial international component and is approved by the director and advisory committee.

Honors in Global Studies

An honors program is available in which the student can pursue a year-long independent research project that also fulfills the seminar requirement; successful completion of this project may entitle the student to graduate with “Honors in Global Studies.” To be eligible, a student must have a grade point average of 3.5 or better in the major at the time of graduation and should submit a statement of intent to the program director by May 1 of the junior year. Students will register for a semester-long workshop on writing honors proposals in the fall; the final deadline for submission of a completed honors thesis proposal is the first Friday in October. See the Global Studies Handbook (online) for further information about procedures, including midyear evaluation and deadline for completion of the thesis.

Requirements for Concentrations

Majors are required to complete a concentration unless they have a double major or minor in anthropology, Chinese, East Asian studies, economics, French studies, German studies, government, history, Italian, Japanese, Latin American studies, Russian, or Spanish. Students may propose an independent concentration. Concentrations should be declared by the spring of the sophomore year. Students may elect more than one concentration.

Concentrations Focusing on Cultures and Places
A concentration focusing on cultures and places requires completion of the following:

  • Four courses dealing with a specific region or cultural grouping such as Francophone Africa. Courses appropriate to each region are listed above under the cultures and places component. At least two of those courses should be taken at Colby. At least one of the four courses must be drawn from the social sciences and at least one other from the humanities.
  • A coordination of cultural specialization with study abroad. For European concentrators, study abroad would normally take place in a non-English-speaking country.
  • A coordination of the language requirement with foreign study where Colby offers an appropriate program.
  • A seminar project or independent study in the senior year that addresses issues in the chosen area.

Thematic Concentrations
Four tracks have been established for thematic concentrations:

  • International Relations/Foreign Policy
  • International Economic Policy
  • Development Studies
  • Human Rights/Social Justice

Each track requires at least four courses designated as relevant to the respective field plus a seminar or an independent senior project relevant to the chosen specialization. Note that some of the courses appropriate for these concentrations are not designated as global studies courses. While they are relevant to their respective specialization, they do not count toward the requirements for the major or the grade point average in the major. These courses are designated by an asterisk (*).

International Relations/Foreign Policy

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) in addition to four of the courses listed below, two of which should be from the Government Department and one from the Economics Department. Introduction to American Government is strongly encouraged as an additional course.

Economics

  • 273 Economics of Globalization
  • 335 Topics in Economic Development
  • 378 International Trade

Environmental Studies

  • 297C Climate Change Policy
  • 298 Our Earth: Governing the Commons

Government

  • 231 U.S. Foreign Policy: The Cold War
  • 238 Politics of War Crime Tribunals
  • 256 Conflict in East Asia
  • 263 Democracy Assistance
  • 264 Challenges to Democracy in Latin America
  • 332 International Organization
  • 335 United States-Latin American Relations
  • 354 The European Union
  • 357 Political Economy of Regionalism
  • 359 Political Ideologies and Revolutionary Movements in Europe
  • 432 U.S. Foreign Policy
  • 435 Memory and Politics

History

  • 322 Europe and the Second World War
  • 325 Prisoners of War and Civilian Internees in the 20th Century
  • 447 The Cold War

Latin American Studies

  • 275 Strongmen and Populism in Modern Spain and Latin America

International Economic Policy

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below; one must be outside of economics and two must be in economics:

Anthropology

  • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power

Economics

  • 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary Latin America
  • 271 International Economic Integration
  • 273 Economics of Globalization
  • 279 Economic Rise and Future of China
  • 335 Topics in Economic Development
  • 373 Open-Economy Macroeconomics
  • 378 International Trade
  • 471 Multinational Corporations

Government

  • 221 Capitalism and Its Critics
  • 332 International Organization
  • 354 The European Union
  • 357 Political Economy of Regionalism

History

  • 364 Environmental and Health History in Africa

Development Studies

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below, one of which is drawn from anthropology, one from cconomics, and one outside of anthropology and economics:

Anthropology

  • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
  • 264 China in Transition: An Anthropological Account
  • 464 Anthropology of Food
  • 498 Anthropology of Creativity

Economics

  • 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary Latin America
  • 279 Economic Rise and Future of China
  • 335 Topics in Economic Development
  • 378 International Trade
  • 471 Multinational Corporations

Environmental Studies

  • 297C Climate Change Policy
  • 298 Our Earth: Governing the Commons

Global Studies

  • 352 Global Activism: From Socialist Internationalism to Occupy

Government

  • 221 Capitalism and Its Critics
  • 252 Politics of the Middle East
  • 253 Latin American Politics
  • 263 Democracy Assistance
  • 264 Challenges to Democracy in Latin America
  • 336 Politics of Development in Africa
  • 451 Political Violence
  • 454 Politics of Development: State, Society, and Markets

History

  • 352 Asian Migrations
  • 364 Environmental and Health History in Africa
  • 394 Ecological History

Sociology

  • 274 Social Inequality and Power

Human Rights/Social Justice

Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below, two of which are drawn from a core of Anthropology 236, Global Studies 211, Sociology 274.

Anthropology

  • 236 Illegal Drugs, Law, and the State
  • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
  • 341 Culture, Mobility, Identity: Encounters in the African Diaspora
  • 374 Public Anthropology
  • 464 Anthropology of Food

Environmental Studies

  • 366 The Environment and Human Health

Global Studies

  • 211 Human Rights and Social Justice in Global Perspective
  • 352 Global Activism: From Socialist Internationalism to Occupy
  • 437 Media, Culture, and the Political Imagination

Government

  • 272* Modern Political Theory
  • 355 Winners and Losers in Chinese Politics
  • 356 Winners and Losers in Japanese Politics
  • 451 Political Violence

History

  • 325 Prisoners of War and Civilian Internees in the 20th Century

Sociology

  • 252 Race, Ethnicity, and Society
  • 274* Social Inequality and Power

Women’s, Gender, and
Sexuality Studies

  • 311* Feminist Theory

Faculty

Director, Professor Patrice Franko
Associate Director, Assistant Professor Maple Razsa
Advisory Committee: Professors Ben Fallaw (Latin American Studies), Patrice Franko (Economics and Global Studies), Paul Josephson (History), Mary Beth Mills (Anthropology), Kenneth Rodman (Government), Raffael Scheck (History), James Webb (History), and Jennifer Yoder (Government and Global Studies); Associate Professors Andreas Waldkirch (Economics) and Hong Zhang (East Asian Studies); Assistant Professors Mohamédoul Niang (French), Maple Razsa (Global Studies), and Cyrus Shahan (German)