September 7
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
The World is our Field of Practice
Elizabeth Jabar, Colby College and Séan Alonzo Harris
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Elizabeth A. Jabar is a feminist printmaker who explores a range of personal-political issues in her work including cultural identity, representation, equity and maternal ethics. She co-creates collaborative and participatory projects with students, colleagues and community members. Her hybrid works on paper and cloth display a highly personal visual language that incorporates motifs from popular culture, folk art, religious traditions and textiles. Elizabeth’s printed objects and environments embody printmaking’s democratic tradition of resistance and collective power and reflect her commitment to art as a tool for social change.

Séan Alonzo Harris is a professional editorial, commercial and fine art photographer concentrating on narrative and environmental portraiture. Over the past 25 years, Séan’s work has featured in a range of national publications, advertising campaigns, and exhibitions. In these varied contexts, Séan’s work focuses on human experience and identity and examines how individuals visualize themselves and how they are portrayed. Séan’s images bear witness to often invisible or overlooked members of our communities, and create portraits that provide a counter image and narrative of self-worth and personal agency.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


September 14
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
What White Western Tourists Want: Border Sentimentalization in Black South Africa
Annie Hikido, Colby College
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

“Border crossing” is often used to describe transgressions that promise growth and possibility. In this talk, I discuss how the emotional pleasure of crossing borders can lead us to romanticize transgression in ways that sustain inequalities. I focus on white Westerners who visit Black townships in Cape Town, South Africa. These tourists decry voyeuristic forms of township tourism and instead wish to “get to know” township residents. They express fulfillment when they feel that they have transcended racial, class, and national divides through interacting with Black South Africans. But their gratification depends on the act of crossing, thereby reifying borders through sentimentalization. Building a more just world therefore must work to undo the conditions that produce their pleasure. I conclude with some thoughts about how this relates to the borders that circumscribe academia and implications for pedagogy.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


September 16
A Conversation with Ibram X. Kendi. Not Racist or Antiracist: What’s the Difference?
A Colby College community event
7:00 p.m., Zoom webinar

Please join Colby President David Greene, Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Tayo Clyburn, and Assistant Professor of Government Carrie LeVan for a conversation with Ibram X. Kendi, a bestselling author and leading scholar of race and racist policy in America.The topic will be “Not Racist or Antiracist: What’s the Difference?” This virtual event is being organized by multiple centers and institutions across Colby and all are welcomed to actively participate. Register to join the discussion.

Kendi, one of the nation’s leading antiracist voices, was recently named the director of the Center for Antiracist Research at Boston University and will serve as the Frances B. Cashin Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for the Advanced Study at Harvard University this academic year. He is a National Book Award-winning and #1 New York Times bestselling author, has published more than a dozen academic articles, delivered Congressional testimony, and been interviewed by a range of well-known personalities from Brian Williams to Oprah. Many of you may be most familiar with Kendi as the author of How to Be an Antiracist, which was part of the Colby Antiracist Book & Film Club this summer that included more than three hundred Colby students, faculty, staff, and alumni and which will be provided to all incoming Colby freshmen.

This event is a collaboration of the Center for the Arts and Humanities, the Center for Small Town Jewish Life, the Colby Museum of Art, the Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs, the Lunder Institute for American Art, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, and the Pugh Center. We are committed both individually and collectively to openly discuss and actively address racial inequities at Colby and beyond. We believe this joint collaboration is an important statement of unity and welcome all to participate.

To register please click here.


September 21
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
History Unbound: Malaga, Performance, and the Archive
Myron Beasley, Bates College and Daniel Minter/Indigo Arts Alliance
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Myron Beasley is Associate Professor of American Studies, and also serves on the committee of Gender and Sexuality Studies at Bates College. His ethnographic research includes exploring the intersection of cultural politics, material culture and social change. A recipient of multiple prestigious fellowships and grants, his writing about performance ethnography, contemporary art, material culture and cultural engagement has appeared in many academic journals. Daniel Minter is an American artist known for his work in the mediums of painting and assemblage. His overall body of work often deals with themes of displacement and diaspora, ordinary/extraordinary blackness; spirituality in the Afro-Atlantic world; and the (re)creation of meanings of home. Minter works in varied media – canvas, wood, metal, paper. twine, rocks, nails, paint. This cross-fertilization strongly informs his artistic sensibility. His carvings become assemblages. His paintings are often sculptural. Minter’s work has been featured in numerous institutions and galleries across the country.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


September 22
Intersections in Environmental Literature, Environmental Justice, and Social Justice: A Reading and Conversation with Camille Dungy
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Camille T. Dungy is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Trophic Cascade (Wesleyan UP, 2017), winner of the Colorado Book Award, and the essay collection Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood and History (W.W. Norton, 2017), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Dungy has also edited anthologies including Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry and From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate, Alliterate, and Just Plain Sound Great. A 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, her honors include NEA Fellowships in poetry (2003) and prose (2018), an American Book Award, two NAACP Image Award nominations, and two Hurston/Wright Legacy Award nominations.


September 28
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
Winin’ Through Cyberspace: Reclaiming Community in COVID times
Adanna Kai Jones, Bowdoin College
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Adanna Kai Jones is an Assistant Professor of Dance in the Department of Theater and Dance. She earned her Ph.D. in Critical Dance Studies at the University of California, Riverside, and her BFA in Dance from Mason Gross School of the Arts—Rutgers University. She has performed in professional dance companies based in NYC, including the “Julia Ritter Performance Group” and “Souloworks” with Andrea E. Woods. Her research remains focused on Caribbean dance and identity politics within the Diaspora, paying particular focus to the rolling hip dance known as winin’.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


October 5
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
Better to speak of conquest or home and trap: a mytho-historical reflection on sonic dispossession, settler-territorialization, property, law, and displacement
Anthony Romero, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Tufts University
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Anthony Romero is a Boston-based artist, writer, and organizer committed to documenting and supporting artists and communities of color. His collaborative practice engages intercultural contact and historical narratives in order to generate reparative counter-images and social transformation. Recent projects and performances have been featured at esteemed institutions across North America. Publications include The Social Practice That Is Race, coauthored with Dan S. Wang, and the exhibition catalogue Organize Your Own: The Politics and Poetics of Self-Determination Movements, of which he was the editor. He is a cofounder of the Latinx Artist Visibility Award, a national scholarship for Latinx artists, and a co-founder of the Latinx Artists Retreat, a national gathering of Latinx artists and administrators.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


October 6
A conversation with Naomi Klein
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

We are delighted to announce that Naomi Klein will be the Fall 2020 keynote speaker for the humanities theme Boundaries and Margins, and will also serve as the 2020 Mellon Distinguished Fellow in Environmental Humanities. Naomi Klein is the inaugural Gloria Steinem Endowed Chair in Media, Culture and Feminist Studies at Rutgers University, and an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, and international and New York Times bestselling author of No Is Not Enough: Resisting the New Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need (2017), This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate (2014), The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007) and No Logo (2000). In 2018, she published The Battle for Paradise: Puerto Rico Takes On the Disaster Capitalists donating all royalties to Puerto Rican organization juntegente.org. Her 2019 book: On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal became an instant New York Times bestseller and a #1 Canadian bestseller.

This event is free and open to Colby students, faculty, staff, parents, alum, and the broader community.

To register for this event, please visit here.

To submit a question for Naomi, please fill out this form by Friday, October 2.

This event is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, Environmental Humanities, the Lunder Institute for American Art, the Colby Museum of Art, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs, and the Environmental Studies program.

 


October 19
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
Centering Disability Culture and Aesthetics
Alice Sheppard (Kinetic Light) in conversation with Michael Maag
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Alice Sheppard smiles broadly. She is a multi-racial Black woman with short curly blonde and brown hair. Her lipstick is a bright fuchsia, which matches the straps of her top. She wears a brightly colored necklace with chunky round beads. Photo by Beverlie Lord.

Alice Sheppard is the Artistic Director of Kinetic Light, a leading disability arts ensemble. Sheppard studied ballet and modern dance with Kitty Lunn and made her debut with Infinity Dance Theater. After an apprenticeship, Sheppard joined AXIS Dance Company, where she toured and taught in the company’s education and outreach programs. As an independent artist, Sheppard has danced in projects with Ballet Cymru, GDance, and Marc Brew Company in the U.K. and Full Radius Dance, Marjani Forté, MBDance, Infinity Dance Theater, and Steve Paxton in the U.S. Her choreography has been commissioned by Full Radius Dance, CRIPSiE, and MOMENTA. For more information about Alice, please visit here.

Michael Maag is a white man with glasses and a long white beard that rests atop his chest. His long hair has a golden-orange glow in the sunlight. Bright green foliage covers a wall in the background. Photo by Tobin Roggenbuck.

Michael Maag is the video, projection, and lighting designer for Kinetic Light. Maag designs at the intersection of lighting, video, and projection for theatre, dance, musicals, opera, and planetariums across the United States. He sculpts with light and shadow to create lighting environments that tell a story, believing that lighting in support of the performance is the key to unlocking our audience’s emotions. Maag has built custom optics for projections in theaters, museums and planetariums; he also designs and builds electronics and lighting for costumes and scenery. For more information about Michael, please visit here.

 

 

 

 


October 22
We are on Indigenous Land: Virtual Screening and Discussion
Corrina Gould, Tim Shay, and Lilah Akins
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

This virtual event brings together Indigenous community leaders for a discussion about the reclamation of Indigenous Ohlone and Wabanaki spaces. We will view three short films Beyond Recognition, i am ákʷitən, the medicine tree vessel that carries our relatives, and The Nibezun Project. Q&A discussion follows with Corrina Gould (Chochenyo and Karkin Ohlone) of the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust, Tim Shay (Penobscot), and Lilah Akins (Penobscot) of Nibezun. Beyond Recognition tells the inspiring story of women creating opportunities and organizing strategies to preserve Native cultures and homelands in a society bent on erasing them.  i am ákʷitən, the medicine tree vessel that carries our relatives is an imaginative exploration of ancestral ties to Wabanaki lands and waters, collectively created by Lilah Akins, Devon Kelley-Yurdin, Emilia Dahlin, Cory Tamler, and Jennie Hahn. The Nibezun Project provides an introduction to Nibezun, a sacred gathering place of the Wabanaki on the Penobscot River.

To register for this event, please click here.

Sponsored by the Critical Indigenous Studies Initiative in American Studies, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the Center for the Arts and Humanities, Oak Institute, Anthropology, Art, Environmental Studies, and History.


October 22
Why the sexual politics of meat matter in 2020
Carol Adams
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom event

Since the first edition of The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory was published in 1990, Carol J. Adams has been a foremost figure in the fight for social justice. She is the author of twenty-six books, along with dozens of other publications, which address such diverse topics as vegetarian ecofeminism, domestic violence, homelessness, racism, prayer, vegetarian lifestyle, parenting, and British literature. Adams will be giving a virtual presentation that draws upon images in contemporary popular culture to provide an ecofeminist analysis of the interconnected oppressions of misogyny, white supremacy, and speciesism.

To register for the event, please click here.

Cosponsored with Student Organized for animal rights, Environmental Studies, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, and the Philosophy department.


October 26
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
Malik Gaines, NYU Tisch School of the Arts, and Alexandro Segade, Cornell
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Malik Gaines and Alexandro Segade are founding members of the collective My Barbarian, who work at the intersection of theater, visual arts, critical practice, and performance to play with social difficulties, theatricalize historic problems, and imagine ways of being together. Realized as drawings, texts, masks, videos, music, installations, and audience interactions, their projects employ fantasy, humor, and clashing aesthetic sensibilities to cleverly critique artistic, political, and social situations. The duo creates and performs a new work, Star Choir. The 45-minute musical performance tracks a group of humans who attempt to colonize a hostile planet after the Earth’s decline. Following some wonder and violence, a hybrid species is formed. Star Choir is performed by six singers and musicians playing synthesizer, cello, harp, horn, bass and percussion, and with animated projections. Gaines and Segade will screen sections of the performance and discuss how this connects to their broader research and artistic practice as artist-scholars.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


October 27
Dr. Isaie Dougnon
Water and Migration: Farmers’ Adaptation Strategies to Climate
Change in the West African Sahel
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom talk

This talk on water and migration themes is based on a new concept in the field of research on migration and climate change and focuses on the Sahel region in West AfricThe Sahel, a transitional zone between the Sahara desert and the savanna, has been particularly affected by desertification, which has led to unpredictable rainfall and drought. This is also an area of significant out-migration to other parts of Africa and Europe. In Mali, the EU estimates that 2.5 million people have been displaced from their homes because of climate-related insecurity. Considering the movement of Sahelian populations in search of areas with heavier rainfall or irrigation, the overall goal of this talk is to examine the interdependence existing between migration, conflict, and climate change in order to confront the challenges facing rural development in the Sahel.


October 31
Boundaries and Margins
About November
A recital by tenor Eric Christopher Perry and pianist Christina Spurling
7:30 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

A recital by tenor Eric Christopher Perry and pianist Christina Spurling explores the human condition through the lens of train travel – across two continents and two nationalistic eras. Benjamin Britten’s Winter Words, Op. 52 (1956) evocatively depicts “a world unknown” with selections of final poems by English novelist Thomas Hardy, whose multitude of works are featured in Colby College’s Special Collections. Gabriel Kahane’s Book of Travelers (2017) captures conversations with fellow passengers while on a cathartic cross-country train ride immediately following the controversial 2016 United States presidential election. An emotional journey about journeys, this program illustrates stories of boundaries beyond geographical borders: racial, socioeconomic, political, and generational.


November 2
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
Toward the Empty Center: Journeys of Cultural Liminality and Elusive Authenticity
Ian Khara Ellasante, Bates College
7:00 p.m., Live Virtual event

Ian Khara Ellasante is an Assistant Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies at Bates College. They are a cultural studies theorist whose current research engages the peoplehood matrix–a core theoretical construct developed by Indigenous scholars–to examine the persistence of Indigenous and Black cultural identities within the oppressive milieu of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and anti-Blackness. In this context, Ellasante examines the history and reclamation of Indigenous extra-binary gender systems and Two-Spirit traditions, Black and Indigenous feminisms, and the resistance inherent in Black and Indigenous trans and queer cultures. In addition to their scholarship, Ellasante is a poet and winner of the 49th New Millennium Writing Award. Their poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The Feminist Wire, Hinchas de Poesía, The Volta: Evening Will Come, We Want It All: An Anthology of Radical Trans Poetics, and elsewhere.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


November 7-8
The Fall Shabbaton
Live Zoom Webinar

Join us for the seventh annual Fall Shabbaton—a spirited, joyful gathering celebrating the best of Jewish life in Maine. Together we will experience a Shabbat weekend full of song, learning, meals, prayer, and outdoor exploration. We will be joined by Deborah Sacks Mintz, Yoshi Silverstein, and Daniel Heinrich. All events will be held on Zoom.

For more information about the schedule of events, please visit here.


November 9
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
What is African Literature? Postapartheid writing and the political force of a question
Mo Shabangu in conversation with Julie Nxadi
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

This conversation looks into the animating subject of African literature on the world literary stage to argue that it cannot circumvent questions about its very nature and being — which constantly disrupts the quest for creative autonomy. Together they will explore the premise that the political dimension of African literature is to be found in its most hushed expressions, rather than in the depiction of the spectacle. Julie Nxadi is a writer and artist from Makhanda and Ngqushwa in the Eastern Cape, currently based in Cape Town. Her current research interest is ‘intimacy and oppression in post-’94 South Africa’, a subject that she is exploring using multiple mediums, writing being just one. Mo Shabangu is an Assistant Professor of English at Colby College who earned his MA at Rhodes University and his Ph.D. at Stellenbosch University. His teaching and research interests fall at the intersection of postcolonial literatures of the 20th/21st century, global Anglophone literature, world literary theory, contemporary African-diasporic cultural production, as well as decolonial strategies in higher education in South Africa.

This series is co-sponsored with the Sociology department, American Studies, African American studies program, French and Italian, Theater and Dance, the Spanish department, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality studies, and the Anthropology department.


November 16
Boundaries and Margins Lecture Series
‘Living Together’ Against Borders: A Disruptive Conversation with Nasim Lomani
Nadia El-Shaarawi, Nasim Lomani, and Maple Razsa, Colby College
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Nadia El-Shaarawi is an Assistant Professor of Global Studies at Colby College. She is a cultural and medical anthropologist who specializes in transnational forced migration, humanitarian intervention, and mental health in the Middle East and North Africa. Her current book project, Collateral Damages, analyzes how, in the aftermath of the 2003 invasion, Iraqi refugees in Cairo negotiated uncertain conditions of protracted urban exile and how interactions with global and international institutions and policies, especially refugee resettlement, had implications for mental health and well-being. Nasim Lomani is a human rights defender and migrants’ rights activist working both in the field and at the political level in Greece and the greater EU for over a decade. Lomani arrived in Greece nearly two decades ago as a 16-year-old from Afghanistan. Upon arrival, he was arrested and charged with illegal crossing of the Greek border, ultimately serving a two-year prison sentence. During the process of appealing to the court for having his rights as a refugee abused and violated, he learned about the bureaucratic difficulties that all migrants face while on the move to Europe. Maple Razsa is committed to using text, images, and sound to embody the lived experience, as well as the political imaginations of contemporary social movements. Trained as a filmmaker and anthropologist at Harvard University, he is an Associate Professor of Global Studies at Colby College. Maple has conducted fieldwork with alterglobalization protesters, anarchist-punk squatters, migrant-labor organizers, video activists, and, most recently, opponents and transgressors of the European border regime. His films—including The Maribor Uprisings, Occupation: A Film About the Harvard Living Wage Sit-In, and Bastards of Utopia—have shown in festivals around the world, including CPH:DOX, Hot Docs, and DOK Leipzig.


November 12
Feminist Struggles in a Changing China: From State Feminism to #MeToo Movements
Dr. Wang Zheng, University of Michigan
4:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Through investigating the visions, strategies, triumphs, and failures of socialist state feminists, this talk explores the high politics of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and raises fundamental questions about male dominance in movements that aim to pursue social justice. Contrasting with the state feminist endeavors in the socialist period, the talk expands the scope to include feminist struggles since the CCP’s turn to state capitalism (the 1980s to present). What are the socialist state feminist legacies in today’s China? How have young generations of feminists been operating in swiftly changing social, economic, and political settings? How do recent Chinese #MeToo movements illustrate grave challenges confronting the contemporary Chinese feminists in a drastically deteriorating political environment?

To access this event, please visit here.