Spring 2020

January 8
Energy/Exhaustion Film Series
Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)
7:15 p.m., Railroad Square Cinema

In the furthest reaches of our planet, in a stark desert landscape where humanity is broken, and everyone is fighting for the necessities of life, there are two rebels who just might be able to restore order—Max (Tom Hardy), a man of action and few words, who seeks peace of mind following the loss of his wife and child in the aftermath of the chaos, and Furiosa (Charlize Theron), a woman of action who believes her path to survival may be achieved if she can make it across the desert back to her childhood homeland. R. 2015. 120 Min.

Screened as part of our 2019-20 Energy/Exhaustion Film Series, a new series of screenings held monthly through April 2020 at Railroad Square Cinema. Presented by Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities and Colby Cinema Studies. FREE ADMISSION for anyone with a Colby College I.D. All others: regular admission prices apply.


January 20
MLK Commemorative Week 2020
Multi-Faith Celebration
4:15 p.m., Lorimer Chapel

A celebration of the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the presentation of the Drum Major for Justice Award. The theme for this year’s MLK commemorative program, Love ✴ Anger ✴ Transformation, is inspired by Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1957 sermon delivered at both the Andrew Rankin Memorial Chapel in Washington, D. C. at the conclusion of Howard University School of Religion 41st Annual Convocation and his local congregation. Focusing on the scripture of Matthew 5:43-45, King shared that, “hate for hate only intensifies the existence of hate and evil in the universe.” King calls us to invoke the “only creative, redemptive, transforming power in the universe,” love, to break the chains of hate and evil. However, King reminders us that the love that he calls for is not simply the beautiful, forgiving, and passive love that may first come to mind.


January 20
MLK Commemorative Week 2020
Tell Me the Truth: Exploring the Heart of Cross-Racial Conversations
5:30 p.m., Cotter Union / Page Commons Room

Colby invites you to join us for a dinner-time chat as we listen in on an honest conversation between Shay Stewart-Bouley and Debby Irving as they discuss racism’s impact on their lives and the ways in which interpersonal dialogue has been instrumental in their own understanding of 21st-century racial dynamics. Following their conversation, participants will be invited to reflect on their own experiences with cross-racial conversations at their tables. Dinner will be provided. RSVP required, please use this link.


January 20
MLK Commemorative Week 2020
“Waking Up White” Book Club Discussion
12:00 p.m., SSWAC / 104 Parker-Reed Room

In preparation for “Tell Me the Truth”, we invite members of our community to participate in this year’s MLK Book Club Discussions. This will be in two parts, to provide individuals the opportunity to engage with both speaker’s literary works. The first will discuss Debby Irving’s book Waking Up White, a personal reflection on Debby’s struggle to understand racism and racial tensions. Individuals will have the unique opportunity to engage with Debby Irving herself to unpack and discuss the impact and content of her work. The book discussion will be facilitated by Debby Irving and lunch will be provided. Those who wish to participate can sign up here to receive a free copy of the book and/or compilation to read in advance.


January 22
MLK Commemorative Week 2020
“Blackgirlinmaine” Book Club Discussion
11:00 a.m., SSWAC / 104 Parker-Reed Room

In preparation for “Tell Me the Truth”, we invite members of our community to participate in this year’s MLK Book Club Discussions. This will be in two parts, to provide individuals the opportunity to engage with both speaker’s literary works. The second will discuss a compilation of work by Shay Stewart-Bouley, including many insights into the experience of being a “blackgirlinmaine”. Individuals will have the unique opportunity to engage with Shay Stewart-Bouley herself to unpack and discuss the impact and content of her work. The book discussion will be facilitated by Shay Stewart-Bouley and lunch will be provided. Those who wish to participate can sign up here to receive a free copy of the book and/or compilation to read in advance.


January 24
MLK Commemorative Week 2020
Self-Guided Reflections on MLK Commemorative Week/em>
2:00-5:00 p.m., Pugh Center

The Pugh Center will be available for individuals to join in community with one another to reflect, individually or collectively, on the events of the week. There will be space and materials for individuals to write letters, draw or color, and engage in dialogue.

 


February 7
PechaKucha Night Waterville V.34
6:20 p.m., Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building

PechaKucha Night Waterville is a creative networking event centered on storytelling in 20×20. Every event is well attended and provides its own distinctive journey. Selected presenters will be notified via email. PechaKucha Night Waterville is presented by a volunteer Team PK, Waterville Creates!, and the Waterville Public Library. The Colby College Center for the Arts & Humanities is the PK Waterville 2019-2020, season sponsor.

 


February 12
Energy/Exhaustion Film Series
Waking Life in 35mm (2001)
7:15 p.m., Railroad Square Cinema

“The film’s protagonist, played by Wiley Wiggins from director Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused, sleepwalks around—sometimes he appears to float—asking essential questions about existence, identity, the nature of the universe and whether it’s a big, stupid risk to make a plotless movie about dreams. That the Texas-based Linklater, celebrated for his 1991 debut Slacker, chose to express his ideas through animation shows he has guts. That he pulls off the innovative feat with hypnotic assurance is nothing short of amazing. This isn’t your dad’s animation, or even Disney’s. Having first shot the film digitally with live actors in Texas and New York, Linklater and art director Bob Sabiston asked 31 artists to computer-paint over that footage in their own distinct styles, assigning different characters and vignettes to each artist.2001. R. 99 Min.

Screened as part of our 2019-20 Energy/Exhaustion Film Series, a new series of screenings held monthly through April 2020 at Railroad Square Cinema. Presented by Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities and Colby Cinema Studies. FREE ADMISSION for anyone with a Colby College I.D. All others: regular admission prices apply.


February 24
Film screening and Q&A with Jana Pareigis
6:30 p.m., Ostrove Auditorium

Jana Pareigis is a journalist and main anchor of the news program “Mittagsmagazin” at ZDF, Germany’s national public television broadcaster. Before that, she was a news anchor of “ZDF-Morgenmagazin”. She is also the director and writer of the television documentary “Afro. Germany” (2017, DW), in which she interviews black people in Germany on racism and empowerment and shares her own personal experiences. In 2010 she completed her journalism traineeship at DW, Germany’s international broadcaster, in Bonn, Berlin, and Brussels and started working as a reporter and TV news anchor for DW’s flagship program “Journal”. She studied political science and African studies in Hamburg, New York, and Berlin and has a Master’s degree from Freie Universität Berlin.


February 26
Maude Barlow, Global Water Expert
7:00 p.m., Ostrove Auditorium

Best-selling author of 16 books and an expert on global water, Maude Barlow has just released her latest book, “Whose Water it is Anyway?” Maude is the National Chairperson of the Council of Canadians and chairs Food & Water Watch’s board. She is also an executive member of the San Francisco-based International Forum on Globalization and a Councillor with the Hamburg-based World Future Council. In “Whose Water is it, Anyway?” Barlow explores the urgent need for water protection in a world that is running out of fresh water. Taking water protection into public hands, she explores how the Blue Communities Project gives people tools they can use to protect water.

Cosponsored by the Oak Institute for Human Rights and the Environmental Studies Program.


March 4
BE DAMMED: Art as Resistance to Environmental Destruction
Carolina Caycedo
7:00 p.m., Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond

Carolina Caycedo is a London-born Colombian artist living in Los Angeles. She participates in movements of territorial resistance, solidarity economies, and housing as a human right. Her work contributes to the construction of environmental historical memory as a fundamental element for non-repetition of violence against human and non-human entities and generates a debate about the future in relation to common goods, environmental justice, just energy transition, and cultural biodiversity. Join us as Caycedo shares her ongoing project, Be Dammed, which uses Indigenous cosmogonies of the Americas, conceptualizing all bodies of waters as connected. Be Dammed investigates the effects that large dams have on natural and social landscapes in several American bio-regions. Carolina uses aerial and satellite imagery, geo-choreographies, and audio-visual essays to intersect social bodies with bodies of water, exploring public space in rural contexts, and conjuring water as a common good.

Cosponsored by the Oak Insitute for Human Rights, the Colby Art Museum, the Spanish Department, the Latin American Studies Program, and the Environmental Studies Program.


March 4
Energy/Exhaustion Film Series
Eraserhead in 35mm (1977)
7:15 p.m., Railroad Square Cinema

A dream of dark and troubling things…David Lynch’s 1977 debut feature is both a lasting cult sensation and a work of extraordinary craft and beauty. With its mesmerizing black-and-white photography by Frederick Elmes and Herbert Cardwell, evocative sound design, and unforgettably enigmatic performance by Jack Nance, this visionary nocturnal odyssey continues to haunt American cinema like no other film. Unrated.89 Min.

Screened as part of our 2019-20 Energy/Exhaustion Film Series, a new series of screenings held monthly through April 2020 at Railroad Square Cinema. Presented by Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities and Colby Cinema Studies. FREE ADMISSION for anyone with a Colby College I.D. All others: regular admission prices apply.

 


March 7
An Energy/Exhaustion Humanities Theme Event
Colby Symphony Orchestra with Guest Narrator Cheryl Townsend Gilkes
7:30 p.m., Lorimer Chapel, Colby College

The Journey to America alternates between energy and exhaustion, between dramatic and sublime. The program begins with works by American masters Samuel Barber and Aaron Copland. Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor of Sociology and African-American Studies, will narrate Copland’s Lincoln Portrait. The program will conclude in Austria with Beethoven’s electrifying, epochal Fifth Symphony.

 

 

 


March 9
SHOUT Keynote Speaker
Tatyana Fazlalizadeh
6:00 p.m., Lorimer Chapel, Colby College
7:30 p.m. Art Crawl

Beginning with a Talk from our SHOUT Keynote Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, the art crawl will be spread around campus so that folks can map out their politics and engage with the mediums in their own way. Tatyana Fazlalizadeh is a Black/Iranian visual artist and Oklahoma City, native. She is a painter whose work ranges from the gallery to the streets, using visual art to address the daily oppressive experiences of marginalized people through beautifully drawn and painted portraits. Her street art series, Stop Telling Women to Smile, can be found on walls across the globe. She is currently the inaugural Public Artist in Residence for the New York City Commission on Human Rights, a year-long residency that will present the experiences of anti-black racism and sexual harassment experienced by New Yorkers through public art. The art crawl will feature a collection of art both traditional and nontraditional to discuss the modes in which we as a community express our politics, beliefs, and identities.


March 12
Andrei Malaev-Babel
4:00 p.m., Parker-Reed Room, Schair-Swenson-Watson Alumni Center

Andrei Malaev-Babel is the Head of Acting and Professor of Theatre at the Florida State University/Asolo Conservatory for Actor Training. He served as the Producing Artistic Director for the Stanislavsky Theater Studio, an award-winning company in Washington, DC, where he was nominated for a Helen Hayes Award as an Outstanding Director. His productions were presented at The Kennedy Center and The National Theater in Washington, DC, where he also appeared as a performer. He has also served on the faculty of The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. During the time of Perestroika, he co-founded the Moscow Chamber Forms Theatre, one of the Soviet Union’s first private companies.


March 16
Climate Stories with Jason Davis
4:00 p.m., Diamond 122

Jason Davis, the founder of the organization Climate Stories Project, has traveled the world collecting the stories of individuals personally affected by climate change, and he is here to share them with us. He will also be giving a performance of his unique “Climate Music.” This performance is co-sponsored by the Music Department, the Center for the Arts and Humanities, the Environmental Humanities Program, and the Buck Lab for Climate and Environment.

 

 


March 17
-CANCELED- Corinna Gould: Film Screening of Beyond Recognition (2014) and discussion, reception following
7:00 p.m., Diamond 122

The American Studies Program’s new interdisciplinary Critical Indigenous Studies Initiative is thrilled to welcome our first guest speaker, Corrina Gould (Chochenyo and Karkin Ohlone) from Ohlone Territory/ Oakland, California. Gould is the spokesperson for the Confederated Villages of Lisjan/Ohlone and co-founder of the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust and Indian People Organizing for Change. About the film: After decades struggling to protect her ancestors’ burial places, now engulfed by San Francisco’s sprawl, a Native woman from a federally unrecognized tribe and her allies occupy a development site to prevent the desecration of sacred ground. When this fails to stop the development, they vow to follow a new path: to establish the first women-led urban Indigenous land trust. BEYOND RECOGNITION tells the inspiring story of women creating opportunities to preserve Native culture and homeland in a society bent on erasing them.

Hosted by the American Studies program with support from the following departments of study: Anthropology, Art, Environmental Studies, Center for the Arts and Humanities, History, The Oak Institute and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.


March 31
Hollis Lecture
Nancy Knowlton
7:00 p.m., Olin 1

Nancy Knowlton is the Sant Chair for Marine Science at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and a scientific leader of the Census of Marine Life. She wrote the book Citizens of the Sea to celebrate the 10 years of the census. Founder of the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography of the University of California, San Diego. Knowlton has devoted her life to studying, celebrating, and striving to protect the multitude of life-forms that call the sea home.


April 7
Energy/Exhaustion Keynote Speaker
2019-2020 Mellon Distinguished Fellow in Environmental Humanities
Naomi Klein
7:00 p.m., Lorimer Chapel, Colby College

We are delighted to announce that Naomi Klein will be the keynote speaker for this year’s humanities theme, Energy/Exhaustion, and also serve as the 2019-2020 Mellon Distinguished Fellow in Environmental Humanities. Naomi Klein is the inaugural Gloria Steinem Endowed Chair in Media, Culture and Feminist Studies at Rutgers University, and an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and international and New York Times bestselling author of, No Is Not Enough: Resisting the New Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need (2017), This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate (2014), The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007) and No Logo (2000). In 2018, she published The Battle for Paradise: Puerto Rico Takes On the Disaster Capitalists (2018) reprinted from her feature article for The Intercept with all royalties donated to Puerto Rican organization juntegente.org. On September 17, 2019, her next book: On Fire: The (Burning) Case for a Green New Deal was published worldwide. It was an instant New York Times bestseller and a #1 Canadian bestseller.

Tickets available to Colby Students, Faculty, and Staff in Pulver Pavilion, Wednesday, March 30, Thursday, March 31, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m., and Thursday, April 1, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. or as long as tickets last.

Students: One ticket per person. Faculty and Staff: Two tickets per person. Colby ID required to obtain tickets. Students may pick up tickets for others with multiple Colby IDs.

A limited number of tickets will be available to the public Thursday, April 1, beginning at 9 a.m. and continuing until 4 p.m. or until tickets are gone. Members of the public can pick up tickets on campus in Pulver Pavilion (in Cotter Union). Two tickets per person, please.


April 13
Film screening and Q&A
Dawnland
7:00 p.m., Diamond 153

For decades, child welfare authorities have been removing Native American children from their homes to save them from being Indian. In Maine, the first official “truth and reconciliation commission” in the United States begins a historic investigation. Dawnland goes behind-the-scenes as this historic body grapples with difficult truths, redefines reconciliation, and charts a new course for state and tribal relations. Dawnland aired on Independent Lens on PBS in November 2018 and received a national Emmy® Award for Outstanding Research in 2019. Esther Anne, a Pasamaquoddy member who worked with the commission, will facilitate the screening and take questions from students.


April 13
Laura Moure Cecchini
7:00 p.m., TBD

In this talk, Laura Moure Cecchini, Assistant Professor of Global Modernism at Colgate University, and Mimmo Cangiano, Lauro de Bosis Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University, will illustrate new perspectives on Italian Studies. They will respond to the provocation “Why does Italian culture matter?” by discussing the ways in which their research paths have offered innovative approaches to Italian culture. Topics of discussion will include exploring the artistic and cultural exchanges between Italy and Latin America and retracing the role that intellectuals have played in Italian and European culture, politics, and society.


April 15
Energy/Exhaustion Film Series
Enter the Void (2016)
7:15 p.m., Railroad Square Cinema

A French drug dealer living in Tokyo is betrayed by his best friend and killed in a drug deal. His soul, observing the repercussions of his death, seeks resurrection… Gaspar Noé’s Enter the Void is a visionary cinematic roller-coaster ride that “represents a revolutionary break from ordinary movie storytelling” —Andrew O’Hehir, Salon. Nathaniel Brown and Paz de la Huerta star in the visceral journey set against the thumping neon club scene of Tokyo, which hurls the viewer into an astonishing trip through life, death, and the universally wonderful and horrible moments in between. “This is a daring, thrilling, awful and wondrous film… one of the most mind-blowing and ambitious feature films ever made” (O’Hehir). Unrated. In English and in Japanese with English subtitles. 2010. 161 Min.

Screened as part of our 2019-20 Energy/Exhaustion Film Series, a new series of screenings held monthly through April 2020 at Railroad Square Cinema. Presented by Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities and Colby Cinema Studies. FREE ADMISSION for anyone with a Colby College I.D. All others: regular admission prices apply.


April 20
Day of the Western Sunrise Film Screening
Q&A with Filmmaker Keith Reimink
7:00 p.m., Ostrove Auditorium

On March 1st, 1954, the United States detonated the thermonuclear bomb Castle Bravo in the Pacific in the first of several nuclear weapons tests. Castle Bravo was the biggest of the tests, and caught in the blast was the fishing vessel Daigo Gukuryu Maru (Lucky Dragon No. 5). Day of the Western Sunrise is an animated documentary telling the story of the 23 men on board the Lucky Dragon, tracing their lives from before their voyage in post-war Japan, to the blast itself and their subsequent quarantine at a Tokyo hospital, to their gradual reintroduction into a society that didn’t quite understand or know how to handle the trauma they had experienced.

Cosponsored with the History department, East Asian studies, and Cinema Studies.