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Periscope:
Gleanings from Earl Smith's campus newsletter, FYI: including tenure for seven, Lyn Mikel Brown in USA Today, Jan Plan intern in Lovejoy winners' tracks; Traci Speed '03 does tumor-cell research; where's Strider Avenue?; Jim Fleming (STS) heralded in West Sussex; Earl Smith ends his 18-year FYI run.

Update:
Bishop Savas Zembillas '79 reports on his ordination and the loss of a Greek Orthodox church in the September 11 attacks on New York.
   

SEPT TENURE
Congratulations to all seven candidates for tenure, who were granted it by unanimous vote of the trustees in January and who will be promoted to associate professor for 2002-03. The list includes Bevin Engman (art); Russell Johnson (biology); Margaret McFadden (American studies); Anindyo Roy, Elizabeth Sagaser and Katherine Stubbs (English all); and Jennifer Yoder (government/international studies). Trustee Colleen Khoury '64, who made the motion, said, "One of the most exciting things is to see the quality of the individuals coming forward."

ALL FIRED UP
When Bets Brown (corporate and foundation relations) saw a call for nominees for Olympic torch-bearers, she said, from her overstuffed chair, "Now that's something I actually would love to do." Herb Wilson (biology), her husband, was in the room and, as we all know, is the right kind of guy. He nominated Bets, enumerating her many volunteer and civic credits, and viola! December 28 was Bets's big day toting the flame for a quarter mile in the Manchester, N.H., area. She was one of about 7,500 torch-bearers on the U.S. roster and said she checked "brisk walk" as the best pace her arthritis will allow.

WONDERING ABOUT 'WONDER DAD'
A January 15 USA Today article about a new book, The Wonder of Girls, by controversial family therapist Michael Gurian quotes Lyn Mikel Brown (education and human development). "'His construction of feminism is simplistic and not based on any feminism I know,' says Lyn Mikel Brown, director of the women's studies program at Colby College in Waterville, Maine."

WORLDWIDE INTERNS
Echo Editor Ryan Davis '02 was so impressed with Tom and Pat Gish, winners of this year's Lovejoy award, that he asked if he could spend Jan Plan at The Mountain Eagle in Whitesburg, Ky. They agreed and invited him to stay at their home, and during January Davis had two front-page stories-one on a water shortage that brought out the National Guard and one on OxyContin addiction in Appalachia. Davis said he wouldn't have been able to take the internship without a scholarship from Colby's Linda K. Cotter Internship Fund.

ANOTHER BUMPER CROP
Applications for the Class of 2006 have arrived from 106 different countries and from every U.S. state except North Dakota according to the Office of Admissions. Interest in early decision remained strong, with a record 512 applications for the two ED phases. The 205 ED admits are an impressive and diverse group, including 27 ALANA students, and the overall pool's combined mean SAT score also reached a new peak.

UP THE POLE POLL
When Elizabeth Frederick '03 cleared 11'1/4" in the pole vault at a track meet February 9 at MIT, it moved her up to 11th in a national poll of Div. III vaulters. It also put her on the wall of fame in the field house with a new Colby record.

UP TO SPEED
Traci Speed
'03 is one of just 10 students in the country selected by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) for a two-year Science Education Award. The award follows her research and publication work on synthesizing recently discovered marine metabolites known to affect several human tumor cells. Already scheduled to present her research at the American Chemical Society in Orlando, Speed now will attend the next two AACR annual meetings, in April 2002 and 2003. "Tracy wonderfully exemplifies the best of a liberal arts training," reports Das Thamattoor (chemistry), who praises her achievements as a volunteer, in dance troupes and on the tennis court as well.

PAYSON ART, ONLINE & OTHERWISE
A new, interactive Web site introducing the Joan Whitney Payson Collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art is online with information about the paintings and artists plus activities for primary and secondary school classes. The Payson Collection is exhibited at the Colby College Museum of Art one semester every two years and is currently on view through June 23. If you can't see the paintings in person, visit the Web site (www.colby.edu/museum/payson), built by Bonnie Bishop and Karen Oh '93.

PRESIDENTIAL THOROUGHFARES
With both a Johnson Heights and a Johnson Avenue in Waterville, there was potential for confusion when residents from either called 911, so city planners decided one had to go. As a result, Johnson Avenue, off Mayflower Hill Drive, has been renamed Strider Avenue in deference to Colby's 17th president, Robert. E.L. Strider. Now find Strider, which used to be Johnson (for Colby's 15th president) just downhill from Roberts Avenue (for Colby's 14th president). Bixler and Cotter drives are both on campus, serving their eponymous buildings.

NEW TOP BOBCAT
Come July, Bro Adams will have seniority among the CBB presidents after just two years as Colby's chief. That's because Bates trustees recently appointed Elaine Tuttle Hansen president effective July 1, succeeding Donald W. Harward. Hansen comes to Maine from Haverford College, where she is provost, and will be the seventh president since Bates was founded in 1855. Barry Mills is Bowdoin's 14th president in 207 years. All three presidents will have taken office on July 1; Adams in 2000, Mills in 2001, Hansen in 2002.

ON JIM'S CALLENDAR
Before Jim Fleming (STS) went to Horsham, England, in March, his visit was already news there. Jim is doing primary research on a scientist, Guy Stewart Callendar, who beginning in the 1930s had theories about global warming. In January the West Sussex County Times ran an article about Fleming's impending arrival, helping to beat the bushes for folks who knew the late Mr. Callendar.

WELLNESS DONE
It's official. Colby's wellness requirement has been changed to an extended orientation program called "First Year Supper Seminars," starting with the Class of '06. Instead of attending at least eight wellness lectures, first-year students will participate in five supper seminars covering the same type of acclimation issues.

The faculty approved the change at its December meeting and the Trustees concurred in January. The carrot for students is a nice dinner with the program; the stick is that they can't register for sophomore classes until they complete the requirement.

WRIT LARGE
For 18 years, Earl Smith wrote and edited the faculty/staff newsletter, FYI, and never once did his name appear in it. Here ends that run. We mention it to recognize his yeoman's service as scribe, for our information, of Colby stories great and small but always brief. We also break the streak to mention that the Alumni Council voted in January to give Earl the Ernest Marriner Distinguished Service Award this year. A tip of the hat to the erstwhile dean.

OLYMPIAN CONNECTIONS
Who saw Hillary Klug '05 wearing a Colby cap on NBC's Olympics coverage? There she was, celebrating with brother Chris after he won bronze for snowboarding. A couple of other Colby connections: 17-year-old Lindsey Kildow, daughter of Linda Krohn Kildow '74, took sixth in the alpine combined. And the assistant coach of the U.S. women's hockey team, Julie Sasner, spent several summers on campus helping Mark Serdjenian '73 with soccer camp. She is the sister of Michael Sasner '83. Julie coaches Courtney Kennedy '01, who spent a season here before moving to Minnesota.

MOOSECELLANEOUS
Allen LaPan and his student post office crew handled 3,007 incoming packages for Valentine's Day. No count on the cards ... Alumni in and around Tokyo are invited to a first-ever happy hour for all NESCAC alumni, in February, "with nijikai to follow?" ... Congratulations to Larissa Taylor (history), recently elected to the Executive Council of the American Catholic Historical Association for a three-year term ... An NPR announcement that, after 13 years as a host of "All Things Considered," Linda Wertheimer was to become NPR's first Senior National Correspondent includes this: "Wertheimer is a graduate of Wellesley College and holds honorary degrees from Colby College, Wheaton College and Illinois Wesleyan University."

 


FEATURES:
Better to Give:
A surge in community service refelcts Colby tradition and national trends

Profiles in Giving

Asking Why
Campus activists question factors that lead to need

The President's Page: "The Liberal Art of Giving"

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