Colby Magazine      
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Summer 2000  
 
Breathing Life into Music

Eric Thomas (music) finds love for jazz is contagious.
   
 

Retiring Types
Wayne Smith (chemistry) and Guy Filosof (French) have retired.

   
  Q & A
Jim Boylan (English), Charles W. Bassett Teach Award recipient, fields questions from Colby magazine.
 

Citizen Wayne and the French Guy

By Stephen Collins '74

Wayne Smith on bike

Wayne Smith, best known in the laboratory for his Chemistry for Citizens class and outside the Keyes building for his environmentally friendly modes of transportation, retired as professor of chemistry after 33 years at Colby. "I concluded fairly early on that it was unfortunate that most people were not going to be chemistry majors," he said, explaining the genesis of his "Citizens" course, aimed at non-majors. Trained in inorganic and organometallic chemistry, Smith co-wrote the text Principles of Chemistry, first published by Macmillan in 1975, and he plans to begin two new books this year.

He said he started walking or cycling to work in 1968, a year after he arrived, realizing that a two-mile commute "is good exercise for an individual and bad for a car." The energy-conservation and environmental-protection benefits weren't widely appreciated at the time.

But Smith's concluding effort to bring chemistry to the layman was appreciated. Addressing the trustees, faculty and administration at the Faculty-Trustee Dinner, Smith played up the mystery that most non-chemists encounter in this particular branch of science, offering a lab demonstration that made chemical solutions change color, explode, smoke and even stink.

Guy T. Filosof, a professor of French at Colby for 30 years, is retiring and, like Smith, will be accorded emeritus status. After earning degrees at Rollins and Middlebury colleges Filosof received a Ph.D. in French literature at the University of Rochester. He taught at Rollins before joining the Colby faculty in 1970, and he specialized in 19th- and 20th-century French literature, 17th-century French theater, and stylistics and translation.

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