Kenneth A. Rodman

William R. Cotter Distinguished Teaching Professor of Government

Box 5310

Phone: 207-859-5310
Fax: 207-859-5229
Mailing Address:
5310 Mayflower Hill
Waterville, Maine 04901-8853
Office Hours:
On Sabbatical 2013-14

Education

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139. Ph.D. in Political Science, 1983. Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02154. B.A. in Politics, 1976.

Areas of Expertise

  • Business-government relations in foreign policy
  • Economic sanctions
  • U.S. foreign policy
  • The United Nations
  • Nuclear weapons proliferation
  • General international relations
  • International Criminal Justice and Conflict Resolution

Courses Currently Teaching

CourseCourse Title
GO131 A Introduction to International Relations
GO231 A U.S. Foreign Policy: The Cold War
GO238 A Politics of War Crime Tribunals
GO332 A International Organization
GO432 A Seminar: U.S. Foreign Policy

Professional Information

Professor Ken Rodman is the William R. Cotter Distinguished Teaching Professor of Government at Colby College, where he has taught since 1989. Ken was the first Director of Colby’s interdisciplinary International (now Global) Studies Program and the Oak Institute for the Study of International Human Rights. He is the author of two books – Sanctity versus Sovereignty: The United States and the Nationalization of Natural Resources in the Third World (Columbia University Press, 1988) and Sanctions Beyond Borders: Multinational Corporations and Economic Statecraft (Rowman & Littlefield, 2001). His current research on international criminal justice and conflict resolution has been published in Ethics & International Affairs, Human Rights Quarterly, the Leiden Journal of International Law, International Criminal Law Review, and the International Encyclopedia of Ethics.

Publications

BOOKS

Sanctity versus Sovereignty: The United States and the Nationalization of Natural Resource Investments (New York: Columbia University Press, 1988).
Sanctions Beyond Borders: Multinational Corporations and U.S. Economic Statecraft (Boulder: Rowman & Littlefield, 2001).

JOURNAL ARTICLES

"Bargaining With The Instruments of Statecraft: Multinational Corporations and U.S. Economic Sanctions Against Nicaragua and Libya" Business and the Contemporary World, 2:4 (Summer 1990), pp. 66-78.
"Public and Private Sanctions against South Africa," Political Science Quarterly 109:2 (Summer 1994), pp. 313-334.
“Sanctions at Bay? Hegemonic Decline, Multinational Corporations, and U.S. Economic Sanctions Since the Pipeline Case,” International Organization 49:1 (Winter 1995), pp. 105-137.
"'Think Globally, Punish Locally': Nonstate Actors, Multinational Corporations, and Human Rights Sanctions," Ethics & International Affairs 12 (March 1998), pp. 19-42.
“Compromising Justice: Why the Bush Administration and the NGOs are Both Wrong about the International Criminal Court” Ethics & International Affairs 20:1 (Spring 2006), pp. 25-53.
“Darfur and the Limits of Legal Deterrence” Human Rights Quarterly 30:3 (August 2008), pp. 529-560.
“Is Peace in the Interests of Justice: The Case for Broad Prosecutorial Discretion at the International Criminal Court” Leiden Journal of International Law 22:1 (March 2009), pp. 99-126
“Why the ICC Should Operate within Peace Processes” Ethics & International Affairs 26:1 (Spring 2012), pp. 59-71.
“Justice is Interventionist: The Political Sources of the Judicial Reach of the Special Court for Sierra Leone,” International Criminal Law Review 13:1 (2013), pp. 63-91.
“Manipulated Commitments: The International Criminal Court in Uganda,” Human Rights Quarterly 36:2 (May 2013), pp. 271-303 - co-authored with Petie Booth, Colby Class of 2011.
"Justice as a Dialogue between Law and Politics: Embedding the International Criminal Court in Conflict Management and Peacebuilding." Journal of International Criminal Justice 12:2 (July 2014), pp. 437-469.
"Intervention and the Justice Cascade: Lessons from the Special Court for Sierra Leone on Prosecution and Civil War." Human Rights Review (forthcoming)

CHAPTERS IN EDITED VOLUMES

"Markets, Sovereignty, and International Regime Change: Constraints on Nationalization Strategies in Peru and Jamaica," in William P. Avery & David P. Rapkin, eds., Markets, Politics, and Change in the Global Political Economy, Yearbook of International Political Economy: Volume 4 (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 1989), pp. 127-149.
"Sanctity versus Sovereignty" in Theodore H. Moran, ed., Governments and Transnational Corporations, United Nations Library on Transnational Corporations: Volume 7 (London & New York: Routledge, 1993), pp. 137-152. Reprint of the Conclusion to Sanctity versus Sovereignty.
“The ICC and Transitional Justice: Should the Prosecutor Exercise His Discretion in the Interests of Peace?” in Roel de Lange, ed., Aspects of Transitional Justice and Human Rights (Nijmegen, The Netherlands: Wolf Legal Publishers, 2007), pp. 5-18.
“Is Peace in the Interests of Justice? The Case for Broad Prosecutorial Discretion at the International Criminal Court,” in Karen Mingst and Jack Snyder, Essential Readings in World Politics, 4th edition (New York: W.W. Norton, 2010), pp 274-292. – Originally published in the Leiden Journal of International Law
“International Criminal Justice,” “The Duty to Prosecute,” The Peace versus Justice Debate,” “The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia,” and “The International Crminal Tribunal for Rwanda,” in Deen Chaterjee, ed., Encyclopedia of Global Justice (Berlin: Springer, 2011), pp. 284-287, 549-546, 824.827.
“International Criminal Justice” in Hugh LaFollette, ed, Encylcopedia of International Ethics (New York: Wiley, 2013).
“Justice is Interventionist: The Political Sources of the Judicial Reach of the Special Court for Sierra Leone,” in Meernik, Rothe, and Bohlander, eds., The Realities of International Criminal Justice (Martnus Nijhoff, 2013) – originally published in the International Criminal Law Review

BOOK REVIEWS

"Review of Oran Young, International Cooperation: Building Regimes for Natural Resources and the Environment" American Political Science Review 84:2 (June 1990), pp. 726-727.
“Review of Lisa Martin, Coercive Cooperation: Explaining Multilateral Economic Sanctions” in American Political Science Review 87:4 (Dec. 1993), pp. 1056-57.
"Review of Robert Massie, Loosing the Bonds: The United States and South Africa in the Apartheid Years" Ethics and International Affairs 13 (March 1999),
Review of Alan P. Dobson, US Economic Statecraft for Survival, 1933-1991: Of Sanctions, Embargoes, and Economic Warfare in Journal of American History, Sept 2004

UNPUBLISHED PAPERS
“The Peace versus Justice Debate at the International Criminal Court: The Case of the Ituri Warlords in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.” (Pedagogical Case Study, 2011)
“Pacting the Law within Politics: Lessons for the International Criminal Court’s First Investigations,” Conference, Facing the Past: The Effectiveness of Remedies for Past Historical Injustice, University of Utrecht, 27-28 May 2010.
“The ‘Peace versus Justice’ Debate at the International Criminal Court,” IVR World Congress of Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy, Jagielonnian University, Krakow, Poland, August 6, 2007
“Transnational Civil Society and Human Rights Sanctions: The Case of the Free Burma Coalition” American Political Science Association, Boston, Massachusetts, August 29-31, 2002
"From Ford-Canada to Helms-Burton: The Domestic Politics of Canadian-American Disputes over Extraterritorial Sanctions," Northeast International Studies Association, Philadelphia, November 13-15, 1997.
"The Privileged Position of Business in American Foreign Policy" (Paper Presented at Northeast International Studies Association, Philadelphia, Nov. 12-14, 1988).

 


The directory information is for individual use only, it may not be retransmitted or published for any reason. It is not to be used for mass solicitations by e-mail, mail, phone or other means. Sale or other distribution of this document is prohibited by College policy.