ES212 Spring 2011 Student GIS Research Projects

In addition to the Atlas of Maine maps, students in ES212: Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing each completed an independent "analytical" GIS research project.

The maps were originally created in ArcGIS 9.3x and exported to the web using ArcIMS, an internet map server from ESRI. To view the maps using ArcIMS, click on one of the the links below. To view the student research poster as a PDF document, click the PDF link next to the map description. The research posters were originally created as 36 x 42 inch posters and reduced to faciliate download by PDF. Please note: The IMS and PDF maps are large files so it may take a few minutes to load unless you are using a high-speed internet connection. ArcIMS works well with Windows operating systems running Internet Explorer. MacIntosh OS X users may need Mozilla Firefox to open and view the dynamic ArcIMS maps. .

Help using the map viewer      Download Adobe Acrobat Reader

Project quick links

 

 

COLBY RECREATIONAL TRAILS SYSTEM : Our map displays the Colby College trail system, along with campus buildings, pathways, an orthophoto background, rivers, ponds and streams. We created a digital elevation model based on contour line data. From there, we developed different levels of difficulty for the trails based on ranges in elevation. We created a 3-D model and exported video fly-through clips. Created by Garrison Beck ('13) and Larissa Lee ('13).

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ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH STRATEGY CENTER MEMBERSHIP: Membership analysis for the Maine based Environmental Health Strategy Center was performed to asses in which legislative districts their membership was strongest. Additional factors were considered such as levels of individual member activity, proximity to local newspapers and political swing districts based on members of the Natural Resources Committee. Created by Kaitlyn Bernard ('13) and Jillian Blouin ('13).

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MODELING HABITAT SUITABILITY FOR MOOSE IN MAINE: The moose is very important to Maine for many reasons, including economic and aesthetic value. It can also be very dangerous to vehicles. To effectively manage moose populations, it is important to know where these animals might be located. Using a GIS and information about moose habitat preferences, I created a model of suitable habitat for moose in Maine. This model, based primarily on land cover, is supported by data on the actual distribution of moose in Maine. Created by Lauren Hendricks ('11).

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SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE INCIDENCE AND POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS IN THE CALIFORNIA BAY AREA: This project uses GIS to investigate proposed environmental factors that contribute to heart disease. This is based on several scientific articles (see references) that have hypothesized positive correlations between areas of increased air and noise pollution and dioxin emissions with heart disease incidence. We examined the Bay Area of California, which consists of nine counties. No significant correlation between our proposed factors and current heart disease incidence was found. Created by Sally Holmes ('13) and Nick Papanastassiou ('13).

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ACCESS TO GREEN SPACE ACROSS RACE IN BOSTON: The purpose of this project was to use GIS and statistical analyses to explore the relationship between access to green space and race in Boston. Using census data, the city was divided by race and block groups. Block groups were categorized based on whether or not they were adjacent to green space. Findings concluded that races are not equally distributed across adjacent and non adjacent block groups, indicating unequal access to green space. Created by Jillian Howell ('12).

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WOODLOT FEASIBILITY FOR BIOMASS FACILITY AT COLBY COLLEGE: This project analyzes woodlot feasibility in providing fuel for the biomass facility being built at Colby College in the spring of 2012. The demand for fuel is estimated at 22,000 tons of wood chips annually, fluctuating monthly due to consumption needs. This project identifies the most feasible woodlots for supplying Colby College based on size and distance from the plant. Categorized, the ranking of woodlots may be applied to decisions about where to get fuel as demand rises. Minimum and maximum thresholds can be derived and scaled based on demand. Created by Theo Papademetriou ('11).

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FACTORS INFLUENCING EPA SITES ALONG THE HUDSON RIVER: The Hudson River is under constant environmental threat from the cities located along its shores. In this project I looked at EPA monitored sites (including sites covered by Superfund) along the Hudson River and their relationships with dam location and urban density. By examining the number of EPA sites in relation to these two environmental factors, we can see if some sites are under substantially more risk than others. My goal in this study was to determine the importance of the relationships between dam density, urban presence, and EPA monitored toxic sites using GIS. Created by Cassie Raker ('13).

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LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION: RESIDENTIAL DISTRIBUTIONS ON THE SHORELINES OF NORTH POND AND EAST POND: In this study I examine the spatial distribution of high value and new residences on the shoreline of East Pond and North Pond. To do so, I analyzed property tax data in ArcGIS, between lakes and within lakes, to determine whether there was spatial clustering of the following shoreline property characteristics: property values, price/meter2 of land, and house age. The results identify six potential areas between the two lakes with significantly higher property values, land values, or house ages. If these variables are effective proxies for household income and resident age, then the identified areas may be good locations for local lake associations to target stakeholder engagement projects. Created by Sophie Sarkar ('11).

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RENEWABLE ENERGY IN WATERVILLE: AN ANALYSIS OF ENERGY LOAD AND POSSIBLE BIOMASS FACILITIES: The goal of this research was to calculate the energy load of buildings in Waterville and to determine the feasibility of building a 5 Megawatt power plant at one of two sites. This would meet the heating requirements of the city through the piping of excess heat to the buildings. We determined the heating load by multiplying square footage with an estimate of energy load per square foot per year and the paths of the pipes were based on preexisting sewer pipes. Our preliminary analysis found that hypothetical power plant site 1 is more efficient in terms of piping distance to 433 commercial and residential zones than site 2. Created by Peter Smithy ('12) and Noah Teachey ('13).

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DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DISPLACEMENT TRENDS: 1950-2010: This project displays census tract data, namely racial statistics, in the District of Columbia over a time period from 1950-2010. By using graduated color symbols to represent racial group densities and ratios, a visual representation of population movements is achieved over time. Racial densities are also compared to medium household incomes to determine if wealth distribution is an indicator of population movement. From these statistical trends, it is possible to extrapolate the data into the future resulting in hypothetical district statistics for 2030 and 2050. The purpose of this study is to visually show past and future projected demographic trends in the District of Columbia, paying particular attention to the movement of black citizens. Created by J. Sarah Sorenson ('11).

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SAFETY AT COLBY COLLEGE: LOCATION OF EMERGENCY CALL BOXES MARKED BY BLUE LIGHTS AND VULNERABLE LOCATIONS AT COLBY COLLEGE: Emergency Call Boxes have been implemented into the security procedures at Colby College. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the visibility of the Emergency Call Boxes that can be located by an accompanying blue light. I found that 44.2% of my study area has visibility of a blue light, 6 buildings of 38 buildings at Colby college have less than 50% visibility in the area around the building, and 16.7% of paths and roads do not have visibility of a blue light. Created by Emily Ten Eyck ('13).

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Students of Environmental Studies 212
Environmental Studies Program,  Colby College
4848 Mayflower Hill,
Waterville, Maine 04901 USA
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Last Modified: 05/31/11 10:02:10 AM