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Our centralized reporting and record keeping helps institutions connect the dots and prevent students from falling through the cracks.

Whether it’s student discipline, academic integrity, care and concern records, Title IX matters, or just an “FYI”, Maxient’s Conduct Manager has you covered for all things related to a student’s conduct and well-being. Maxient serves as an integral component of many schools overall early alert efforts, helping to identify students in distress and coordinate the efforts of various departments to provide follow-up.


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Judy Stone, professor of biology and Dr. Charles C. and Pamela W. Leighton Research Fellow, discusses the Darwinian Revolution. Darwin’s theories on descent with modification and evolution by natural selection revolutionized biology. Both of these theories rest upon an underlying insight called population thinking, which recognizes that variation among individuals within a species is the key ingredient of evolution and adaptation. Population thinking is arguably Darwin’s most original insight because it overcomes thousands of years of typological thinking, in which variation is considered to be imperfection around the true type. Unfortunately, despite Darwin’s brilliant insight, typological thinking persists in biology, medicine, journalism, and the public mind. Typological thinking can lead to erroneous and even dangerous conclusions, especially when applied to the human species. Cutting-edge approaches in genomics have the potential to finally complete the Darwinian paradigm shift so that the complexity of variation is fully appreciated.

Contact: Megan Fossa, mefossa@colby.edu, 207-859-4165


Revolutions_Climate

Most people today view climate science as a field wholly occupied with the practical problem of global warming. But, as with most scientific endeavors, the field has moved forward by scientists driven by their own curiosity to meet a series of fascinating intellectual challenges, whether or not they had any practical consequences. In this talk, Kerry Emanuel, Cecil & Ida Green Professor of Atmospheric Science at MIT, will tell the stories of the most important revolutions in climate science, from the discovery of the greenhouse effect to the determination of the cause of ice ages, concluding with how these revolutions inform our current view of climate change.

Contact: Megan Fossa, mefossa@colby.edu, 207-859-4165


Cuba

A problematic romance; a less problematic revolution. Sean Connery (the first James Bond!) and Brooke Adams star in Richard Lester’s knowing, sharp, beautiful, underrated, and offbeat anti-romance set against the Cuban revolution. “A political film within which no one speaks about politics, and a love story in which no one speaks about love,” as Lester put it. Cuba (1979) follows Connery’s mercenary British officer to Cuba to help train Batista’s army against Castro and Guevara’s strengthening guerilla movement while attempting to revivify a lost love affair with Adams’ Alexandra, now married to a corrupt plantation owner. Sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities.

Contact: Megan Fossa, mefossa@colby.edu, 207-859-4165


Dissecting_Violence

How do Colby professors use their disciplines to respond when violence convulses our world? When police shoot and are shot at, when bombs explode and refugees drown, what can the arts and humanities, in particular, teach us? Join us as professors Carleen Mandolfo (Religious Studies), Aaron Hanlon (English), and visiting artists Brother(hood) Dance! explore how to parse the violence all too common in our fragile world. Lunch provided! Sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities.

Contact: Megan Fossa, mefossa@colby.edu, 207-859-4165


Dissecting_Violence

How do Colby professors use their disciplines to respond when violence convulses our world? When police shoot and are shot at, when bombs explode and refugees drown, what can the arts and humanities, in particular, teach us? Join us as professors Lisa Arellano (WGSS), Gary Green (Art), and Anindyo Roy (English) explore how to parse the violence all too common in our fragile world. Lunch provided! Sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities.

Contact: Megan Fossa, mefossa@colby.edu, 207-859-4165


Constellations

Constellations is a multimedia theater piece by Alexis Atkinson ’15 that aims to reflect and track the psychological and emotional development of a young black female. The one-woman play utilizes different modes of storytelling—prose, narrative anecdote, spoken word, and poetry—to explore the depth of how one can experience marginalization. An unnamed Lead takes the audience on a tour through the Garden of Dreams, a holding space for unrealized aspirations and the unresolved past. The piece travels through time and space to capture wrestling with identity politics throughout crucial moments of development and self-discovery. In partnership with the Pugh Center, College and Student Advancement, and the Center for the Arts and Humanities.

Contact: Shannon Hodgdon, shannon.hodgdon@colby.edu, 207-859-4520