In the closing concerts of the season, the Colby Symphony Orchestra will combine forces with the Colby College Chorale and Kennebec Choral Society to present Mozart’s Requiem. Also featured will be a performance by the winner of the Music Department’s annual concerto competition. Sponsored by the Music Department.

Contact: Deb Ward, djward@colby.edu, 207-859-5670


In the closing concerts of the season, the Colby Symphony Orchestra will combine forces with the Colby College Chorale and Kennebec Choral Society to present Mozart’s Requiem. Also featured will be a performance by the winner of the Music Department’s annual concerto competition. Sponsored by the Music Department.

Contact: Deb Ward, djward@colby.edu, 207-859-5670


Fortepianist David Hyun-sun Kim returns to Colby with violinist Lauren Basney to present a program of Mendelssohn and Schumann. The duo will perform on early-19th-century instruments including a fortepiano built in Maine by Rodney Regier. Sponsored by the Music Department.

Contact: Deb Ward, djward@colby.edu, 207-859-5670


Directed by Jesse Wakeman, the Colby Collegium Musicum performs Antonio Vivaldi’s masterful Gloria. This brilliant and complex work for choir and orchestra, with soprano and mezzo-soprano soloists, is sure to invigorate the soul and ring in the spring. Sponsored by the Music Department.

Contact: Deb Ward, djward@colby.edu, 207-859-5670


In January 2013 Angus King was sworn in as Maine’s first Independent United States Senator, filling the same seat once held by storied Maine leaders Edmund Muskie, George Mitchell, and Olympia Snowe. Senator King is a member of the Armed Services Committee, the Select Committee on Intelligence, the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, the Committee on the Budget, and the Committee on Rules and Administration. He cofounded the Former Governors Caucus, which brings together the Senate’s former governors to chart pragmatic approaches to solutions, as well as the Senate Arctic Caucus, which hones in on Maine and America’s growing interest in the Arctic. Sponsored by the Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement.

Contact: Amanda Cooley, goldfarb@colby.edu, 207-859-5300


Open Midnight weaves two parallel stories about the great wilderness—Brooke Williams’s year alone with his dog, ground truthing backcountry maps of southern Utah, and that of his great-great-great-grandfather, William Williams, who in 1863 made his way with a group of Mormons from England across the ocean and the American wild almost to Utah, dying a week short. The story follows two levels of history—personal, as represented by his forbear, and collective, as represented by Charles Darwin, who lived in Shrewsbury, England, at about the same time as William Williams. Brooke Williams has spent the last 30 years advocating for wilderness. He is the author of four books, including Halflives: Reconciling Work and Wildness and The Story of My Heart, by Richard Jeffries, as rediscovered by Brooke Williams and Terry Tempest Williams. Sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program.

Contact: Lia Morris, escoordinator@colby.edu, 207-859-5356