Global Labs

Spring 2018 Art History
AR458  American Art in a Global Context
Four credit hours.  U.  Sheehan

What does it mean to study American art in a global context? This question has reframed the field of American art history in the 21st century, stimulating studies of artists abroad, (inter)national styles and subject matter, and the global construction, circulation, and interpretation of images. In this global lab, students have a unique opportunity to witness and contribute to this scholarly shift at three sites: the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Colby College Museum of Art. At each site, students will meet with curators and conduct original research that will inform oral presentations and writing assignments.

Spring 2018 Government
GO357  Political Economy of Regionalism   

Four credit hours.  Hatch

Comparative analysis of economic and political integration in three regions: Europe (the EU), North America (NAFTA), and Asia. Why do states agree to give up some sovereignty by cooperating on regional projects? Why do these projects vary so much from region to region? As part of this Global Lab, students learn how to use GIS software to build maps documenting the demographic and economic processes of regionalization in three areas of the world.

 

Fall 2017 Global Studies
GS497  Insurgent Mobilities Lab I: Migrants, Activists, the Balkan Route  
Four credit hours.  S, I.  El-Shaarawi

The dynamics of global migration–specifically, the tension between state and regional efforts to control migration and the efforts of migrants and activists to advocate for open borders and freedom of movement. Students join instructor’s research team for an ongoing multi-sited project on the Balkan route that hundreds of thousands have traveled to seek a better life in Northern Europe. Students learn about the causes and consequences of the European migrant crisis and the ways that migrants and activists worked together to build the Balkan route despite restrictive European policies. Involves reading the latest research, analyzing primary data, and creating original research products. Fulfills anthropology’s culture area requirement.

Spring 2018 Global Studies
GS498  Insurgent Mobilities Lab II: Migrants, Activists, the Balkan Route  

Four credit hours.  I.  Razsa

The dynamics of global migration–specifically, the tension between state and regional efforts to control migration and the efforts of migrants and activists to advocate for open borders and freedom of movement. Students join instructor’s research team for an ongoing multi-sited project on the Balkan route that hundreds of thousands have traveled to seek a better life in Northern Europe. Students learn about the causes and consequences of the European migrant crisis and the ways that migrants and activists worked together to build the Balkan route despite restrictive European policies. Fulfills anthropology’s culture area requirement. A continuation of Insurgent Mobilities Lab I, but students need not have taken I to enroll in II.

 

 

Global Innovation Course

JanPlan 2018 Government
GO338  Field Study in African Development   

Three credit hours.  Seay

Students will spend approximately three weeks of this global innovation course in Uganda comparing international, local, and diaspora-driven approaches to economic and social development. Through discussions with local, international, and development practitioners, observation of development projects, a rural home stay, and meetings with local and international policymakers, students will learn to identify, compare, and contrast varying theoretical and practical approaches to development in Africa, assess the effectiveness of international, diaspora-driven, and local approaches to development and its promotion in Uganda.