Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America

Colby Election Initiative Event Feb. 29 | 7 p.m. | Schair-Swenson-Watson Alumni Center, Parker Reed Room Ari Berman, contributing writer, The Nation magazine; Investigative Journalism Fellow, The Nation Institute In his groundbreaking narrative history, Ari Berman charts both the transformation of American democracy under the VRA and the counterrevolution that has sought to limit voting rights, from...

Spending, Substance and Special Interests: Assessing the Role of Super PACs and Dark Money in the New Campaign Finance Era

Feb. 15 | 7 p.m. | Diamond 122 Erika Franklin Fowler, assistant professor and director of the Wesleyan Media Project, Wesleyan University Outside Group advertising in elections skyrocketed after a series of campaign finance decisions by the Supreme Court culminating in the seminal Citizens United case. What effect does this spending have on the electorate? This talk discussed trends...

Genetically Modified Foods: Perils and Promises

2015 William R. and Linda K. Cotter Debate The 2015 Cotter Debate focused on broad-ranging issues associated with the development of genetically-modified (GM) foods. New technologies may offer the promise of better foods, including nutrient-enriched rice and potatoes that can be fried without producing the carcinogen acrylamide. Many feel that GM crops are needed to...

The Nasty News on Incivility and Intransigence: How Political Information Makes Americans Rude and Stubborn

Nov. 17 | 7 p.m. | Diamond 122 J. Cherie Strachan, Professor of Political Science and Public Administration, Central Michigan University Michael Wolf, Associate Professor of Political Science, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) American politics has become increasingly polarized over the past two decades. This trend emerged as a result of elite electoral and campaign...

Division and Despair: Reporting on America’s Economic Inequality

2015 Lovejoy Panel Discussion Economic inequality is the defining issue of our day. The gap between the very rich and very poor in developing nations dashed hopes that all boats would rise together. Certainly the writings of Katherine Boo, the 2015 Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award Winner, underscore what some believe to be the persistent link...

Nigerian Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

Nigeria Economic Prospects: Moving Forward in a Weak Oil World Cosponsored with the Global Studies Department As the first female finance minister of Nigeria, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala is lauded for ridding the country of $30 billion dollars of external debt and growing the GDP despite a slow global recovery. She has championed reform in the Nigerian government’s dependency...

George J. Mitchell Distinguished International Lecture: U.S. Senator Susan Collins

Why Moderation and Bipartisanship Lead to Progress The 2015 George J. Mitchell Distinguished International Lecture will feature U.S. Senator from Maine Susan Collins. First elected in 1996, Senator Collins is serving her fourth term in the U.S. Senate. Known for her work in facilitating bipartisan compromise, Senator Collins is a key leader in the U.S....

10 Percent Happier: ABC’s Dan Harris ’93 on Meditation

Most Americans recognize Dan Harris ’93 as co-anchor of ABC News Nightline and the weekend edition of Good Morning America, but did you know that he is also author of a New York Times bestseller? Harris’s book, 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found...

Concussions in Sports: Creating Evidence-Based Concussion Management Policies

Christine Baugh, Ph.D. Student in Health Policy, Harvard University In recent years, concussions have garnered significant public attention as well as state and sports-league policy responses. This lecture discussed existing evidence about concussions, their acute and long-term effects, and concussion management policies currently in place at the state and sports-league levels.