The European Debt Crisis: Views from Economic, Political and Social Perspectives

The plight of the European Union remains in the headlines as the effects of the economic crisis continue to unfold. A panel of Colby professors articulate their thoughts on what the future holds for the EU, including: Associate Professor of Economics Andreas Waldkirch; Robert E. Diamond Professor of Government and Global Studies Jennifer Yoder; and...

Oak Research Organization Presentations

Colby students present the findings of independent research on excluded or marginalized groups that are asserting their human rights: the indigenous peoples of Bolivia, the Berbers of Morocco and France, Uyghurs in northwestern China, the Roma of Europe, travesti in urban Brazil, and the Banyamulenge in central Africa.

Young Teachers as Leaders in Urban School Reform

Teach Plus Boston Executive Director and former Boston Public Schools teacher Maria Fenwick (Colby ’03) speaks about teachers’ roles in urban school reform and education policy-making. Teachers with fewer than ten years of experience now make up a majority of teachers across the United States. At the same time, up to 50% of teachers leave...

Colby Volunteer Center Panel: Realities of Youth Homelessness in Maine

Throughout the month of November, the Colby Volunteer Center (CVC) is organizing a series of events to help increase awareness on campus about homelessness in the greater Waterville area. As part of this series, the CVC hosted a panel discussion focused specifically on the issues facing homeless youth in the state of Maine. Panelists included:...

William R. and Linda K. Cotter Debate: Foreign Aid and the Environment

Nigel Purvis, President of Climate Advisers and Nonresident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution, and James Roberts, Research Fellow for Economic Freedom and Growth at The Heritage Foundation, debate the question: Should protecting the environment be a key objective of U.S. foreign assistance?

Poverty in America: An Economic Human Rights Perspective

In the U.S. today, 44 million people — about one out of every seven Americans — live in poverty. How can this happen in one of the richest countries on earth? Why do we allow it? This talk, presented by someone who has coped with hard times, makes the case for basic economic security as...

A Conversation with the Governor of Maine

On January 5, 2011, Paul LePage was sworn in as the 74th governor of the State of Maine, the first Franco-American to hold that office. The first year of Governor LePage’s term has been far from easy as the Republican former mayor of Waterville has confronted pressing problems concerning the economy and the state budget...

Six Minutes To Doomsday: Assessing the State of the Nuclear Threat

Since 1947, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has monitored “how close humanity is to catastrophic destruction,” adjusting the hands of its doomsday clock closer to or farther away from midnight in response to events making “doomsday” either more or less likely.¬† The clock has always primarily assessed the threat of nuclear weapons devastation, and...

The Supreme Court and Civil Rights: A Promise Unfulfilled?

Nancy Gertner, winner of the Morton A. Brody Award for Distinguished Judicial Service in 2010, recently left the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts to join the faculty of Harvard Law School. Her memoir, In Defense of Women: Memoirs of an Unrepentant Advocate, has recently been released to rave reviews. Judge Gertner...

Oak Lecture: One Illness Away – Global Poverty and Human Rights

How do people people “fall” into poverty, and how do they manage to escape what seems, to some, like their predetermined fate? Statistics don’t tell us very much. Prof. Anirudh Krishna, a political scientist¬†at Duke University, has tackled these questions in a fascinating new study of 35,000 households in five countries and four continents.