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Tuesday, 3rd March, William D. Adams Gallery, Museum Lobby
Reception 6:30 PM, Lecture 7:00 PM

Martín Chambi (1891-1973) is one the most important Latin American photographers from the past century. Chambi grew up in a peasant family from the highlands of Peru and developed his photographic art in the city of Cuzco. His work depicted all sectors of the society and he gained great prestige as a professional photographer. Chambi’s photography is considered a reference of the Andean World, particularly through images that bring back dignity to humble people. This lecture explores Chambi’s special interest in self-portraits where he aimed to create a different image of himself with each photograph.

For a sample of Chambi’s photographs visit: www.martinchambi.org

Celia Rubina Vargas is a Professor of Semiotics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Perú. She is also a member of the Peruvian Association of Semiotics, the Mexican Association of Visual Semiotics and Space, and the research center Instituto Riva-Agüero at PUCP; Coordinator of the Peruvian delegation ALED (Latin American Association of Speech Studies); General Secretary of the FELS (Latin American Federation of Semiotics); and Representative of Peru to the IASS (International Association for Semiotic Studies). She received her PhD in Science of Language from the Université de Toulouse (France) with a specialization in semiotics (analysis of discourse).

Rubina’s research and publications in semiotics focus on Andean and Amazonian oral tradition (from the ancient mythical stories of the Manuscript of Huarochirí to the current myths and popular stories). She has also worked on the intertextuality of the theater/drama texts (particularly contrasting Greek tragic plays with contemporary Latin American theater). In the field of visual semiotics Rubina’s research is focused on the colonial paintings of Cuzco as well as in the contemporary visual arts (photography, painting and other).

Sponsors: Latin American Studies Department, Spanish Department, and the Colby College Museum of Art