Tilar Mazzeo (English) Eliza Hamilton: The Extraordinary Life and Times of the Wife of Alexander Hamilton Gallery (2018)

Tilar Mazzeo (English)
Eliza Hamilton: The Extraordinary Life and Times of the Wife of Alexander Hamilton
Gallery (2018)

The hit musical Hamilton introduced theater audiences to Eliza Hamilton, wife—and eventually widow—of Alexander Hamilton. Mazzeo’s biography brings Eliza Hamilton fully to life in a meticulously researched and engagingly told account. In this telling, Hamilton is revealed as a heroine of her time, but one whose contributions as a pillar of strength of early America have been overlooked. Mazzeo recreates Hamilton’s world, from the terror of the French and Indian War in upstate New York, to the sudden loss of her husband, to her contributions as a philanthropist in her later years. As she has in her earlier biographies—most recently Irena’s Children—Mazzeo transports readers to an earlier time and effectively brings historical characters life.


Tanya Sheehan (Art), editor
Photography and Migration
Routledge (2018)

Tanya Sheehan (Art), editor Photography and Migration Routledge (2018Sheehan has edited and contributed to this timely and thought-provoking collection, bringing together scholars to explore photography’s complex and crucial relationship to migration and our perceptions of it. From the Syrian refugee crisis to migration across the U.S. southern border to Franco emigration from Canada, the writers explore how cameras are used to not only document, but also to inhibit or encourage movements across borders. Photographers taking photos of migrants, migrants taking photos of themselves, and the photographs themselves that are carried along the route—images are central to our understanding, or misunderstanding, of human migration.


Sonja Thomas (Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies)
Privileged Minorities: Syrian Christianity, Gender, and Minority Rights in Postcolonial India
University of Washington Press (2018)

Sonja Thomas (Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) Privileged Minorities: Syrian Christianity, Gender, and Minority Rights in Postcolonial India University of Washington Press (2018) As fellow scholars have pointed out, Thomas breaks new ground in her exploration of the place of Syrian Christian women in Kerala, India. A minority within a minority, these women hold a privileged position in terms of caste, race, and class. That status is fertile ground for Thomas, who uses an intersectional approach and U.S. women of color feminist theory to explore how this community illuminates larger questions, including those raised by a group experiencing both privilege and subjugation. Thomas’s extensive research in Kerala reveals the ways that race, caste, gender, religion, and politics are intertwined.


Laurie Osborne (English), Pascale Aebischer, and Susanne Greenhalgh
Shakespeare and the ‘Live’ Theatre Broadcast Experience
Bloomsbury (2018)

Laurie Osborne (English), Pascale Aebischer, and Susanne Greenhalgh Shakespeare and the ‘Live’ Theatre Broadcast Experience Bloomsbury (2018)It isn’t the Globe theater anymore. Shakespeare’s work, performed before living audiences for centuries, now is broadcast live to audiences around the world. This collection of essays examines how the Bard’s plays are experienced in this new wave of globalization. How “live” is a live performance? What are the ideological implications of consuming theater on screen? How does social media come into play? Is the material considered differently by producers and actors who are aware if their audience is live and global? One thing’s for certain. Live Shakespeare isn’t going away.


Gretchen Kreahling McKay ’87, Nicolas Proctor, Michael Marlais (Art, emeritus)
Modernism versus Traditionalism: Art in Paris, 1888-1889
University of North Carolina Press (2018)

Gretchen Kreahling McKay ’87, Nicolas Proctor, Michael Marlais (Art, emeritus) Modernism versus Traditionalism: Art in Paris, 1888-1889 University of North Carolina Press (2018)McKay, professor of art history at McDaniel College in Virginia, turns the teaching of her subject on its head with this entry into the Reacting to the Past series (see P. 43). The book details how to have students take on roles in the charged debates over the future of art in the late 19th century. Once you’ve been Van Gogh storming the ramparts of convention, you won’t forget it. Marlais, McKay’s former professor, was enlisted as well to make sure the participants stay true to the history they are reliving


Patrice Franko (Economics and Global Studies)
The Puzzle of Latin American Economic Development
Rowman & Littlefield (2018)

Patrice Franko (Economics and Global Studies) The Puzzle of Latin American Economic Development Rowman & Littlefield (2018) In this, the fourth edition of a much-used and respected text, Franko provides economic tools for students to consider the evolution of the political economy of Latin America. The new edition highlights recent macroeconomic changes in the region and analyzes challenges to the neoliberal model of development. Reviewers and scholars hail the text and this edition as a tool for beginning students to understand the puzzle of economic development and its often problematic recent history in Latin America. Charts and tables with the most current data available and boxed discussions and vignettes make this latest version timely and essential.


Patrice Franko with Stephen C. Stamos Jr.
The Puzzle of Twenty-First-Century Globalization: An International Economics Primer
Rowman & Littlefield (2017)

Patrice Franko with Stephen C. Stamos Jr. The Puzzle of Twenty-First-Century Globalization: An International Economics Primer Rowman & Littlefield (2017)Franko and Stamos bring an interdisciplinary approach to the interrelated economic aspects of globalization. By offering a primer for trade, finance, and multinational production alongside discussion of the changing role of developing countries, the authors show how globalized systems have created prosperity but also instability. The political reactions to the costs of globalization—think Brexit and the rise of Donald Trump—can only be fully understood with this appreciation of the dynamics of the global economy of the 21st century.


Briana and Andrew Volk ’05
Northern Hospitality with the Portland Hunt + Alpine Club: A Celebration of Cocktails, Cooking, and Coming Together
Voyageur (2018)

Briana and Andrew Volk ’05 Northern Hospitality with the Portland Hunt + Alpine Club: A Celebration of Cocktails, Cooking, and Coming Together Voyageur (2018)When Bon Appétit magazine named Portland, Maine, its 2018 Restaurant City of the Year, Portland Hunt + Alpine Club and its sister restaurant, Little Giant, got a big thumbs up. The national shout-out is a call for foodies to visit Portland ASAP. But there is another way to experience Briana and Andrew Volk’s distinctive food and drink. This handsome book, with photos and recipes, introduces readers to the restaurant’s trademark craft cocktails and Scandinavian-inspired food. Drinks like Green Eyes and bar snacks like smoked trout deviled eggs will have you sitting by the fire in no time. The bar has twice been a James Beard semifinalist, and Volk was named one of the “Best New Mixologists” for 2016 by Food & Wine magazine. This is how it’s done.


Emily Boyle Westbrooks ’06
The Dead Samaritan
Endeavour Media (2018)

Emily Boyle Westbrooks ’06 The Dead Samaritan Endeavour Media (2018)A transplant to Ireland, Westbrooks has mined the darker side of her adopted home in this gritty debut crime thriller. Fleeing a family blow-up in Boston, investigative blogger Sean Deery lands in Dublin and is brutally mugged. Manny, an African immigrant, comes to his rescue and is nearly killed in the process. As Sean sets out to return the favor by locating Manny’s missing sister, he is pulled into a deepening spiral of danger and deceit. Police tag Sean as a drug dealer. Manny’s past is mysterious and murky. Dublin’s thugs are coming out of the woodwork. Sean’s new Irish love, Nora, says no good will come of it, and she turns out to be suspensefully spot on.


Tristram Korten ’87
Into the Storm: Two Ships, a Deadly Hurricane, and an Epic Battle for Survival
Ballantine (2018)

Tristram Korten ’87 Into the Storm: Two Ships, a Deadly Hurricane, and an Epic Battle for Survival Ballantine (2018)Hurricane Joaquin, which cut a swath through the Bahamas in September 2015, may be most remembered for one of its victims: the cargo ship El Faro, which sunk in the throes of the storm. Thirty-three crew members, including many Mainers, were lost. Korten, a Miami-based journalist, reveals the rest of the story, including the heroism of a Coast Guard rescue swimmer who dropped into the maelstrom to pull the crew of a second doomed cargo ship to safety. The book tracks the last harrowing hours on the two ships, the decisions that dictated their fates, and the rescuers who risked their own lives to pluck crewmen from raging storms. Reviewers favorably compare Korten’s first book to the work of Sebastian Junger, author of The Perfect Storm, a classic piece of nonfiction about the unforgiving sea.


Ned Shenton ’54
Grateful Ned: The Life Story of Edward Heriot Shenton
Komatik Press (2018)

Ned Shenton ’54 Grateful Ned: The Life Story of Edward Heriot Shenton Komatik Press (2018)Shenton’s memoir is a rollicking tale that includes everything from his account of the Colby Sailing Club to his work on the Cousteau Diving Saucer for the famed explorer. Undersea engineering led to work for Lockheed on a submarine to inspect undersea dumping areas, which eventually led to one of the earliest studies of what we now know as global warming. All of this and much more is interspersed with the comings and goings of Shenton’s busy life, cameo appearances by the famous (E.B. White and Andrew Wyeth were honored at Colby commencement in 1954; the actor Claude Rains was Shenton’s grandfather), and recollections of houses, sailboats, and the other markers of a remarkably full and fascinating life.


Faculty Publications

S. Tariq Ahmad (Biology), Sarah E. Vandal ’19, and Xiaoyue Zheng ’20, “Molecular Genetics of Frontotemporal Dementia Elucidated by Drosophila Models—Defects in Endosomal–Lysosomal Pathway,” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Volume 19, no. 6, 2018.

Marta Ameri (Art), Sarah Kielt Costello, Greg Jamison, Sarah Jarmer Scott, and others, Seals and Sealing in the Ancient World, Cambridge University Press, 2018.

Chandra Bhimull (Anthropology and African-American Studies), “In Black Panther and Wakanda, extraordinary possibilities are realized,” From the Square, NYU Press Blog, March 13, 2018.

Adrian Blevins (English), “Love Poems for Leonardo da Vinci” and “Status, Alas,” Connotation Press, 2018. “Cult Status” and “Social Status,” diode, Volume 2, no. 2, 2018. “Southern Status Anxiety,” Storyscape Journal, Issue 20, 2018.

Sarah E. Duff (History), “Dried Fruit and the Cocktail Menace: Race, Food, and Purity in Interwar South Africa” The Historical Cooking Project, 2018.

Neil Gross (Sociology), “Is the United States Too Big to Govern?” New York Times, 2018

Britt Halvorson (Anthropology), Conversionary Sites: Transforming Medical Aid and Global Christianity from Madagascar to Minnesota, University of Chicago Press, 2018.

Daniel Harkett (Art), “Tea vs. Beer: Class, Ethnicity, and Alexander Dorner’s Troubled Tenure at the Rhode Island School of Design,” Why Art Museums? The Unfinished Work of Alexander Dorner, edited by Sarah Ganz Blythe and Andrew Martinez. 93-112. MIT Press, 2018.

Adam Howard (Education) and Claire Maxwell, “From conscientization to imagining redistributive strategies: Social justice collaborations in elite schools,” Globalisation, Societies, and Education, 2018.

Russell Johnson (Biology), Grace Uwase ’18, Taylor P. Enrico ’17, David S. Chelimo ’17, Benjamin R. Keyser ’10, “Measuring Gene Expression in Bombarded Barley Aleurone Layers with Increased Throughput,” Journal of Visualized Experiments, 2018.

Loren McClenachan (Environmental Studies) and Jeffrey O’Hara, “Missing the Boat? Measuring and Evaluating Local Groundfish Purchases by New England Institutions,” Journal of Ocean and Coastal Economics, Volume 5, issue 1, 2018.

Anais Mauer (French), “Nukes and Nudes: Root identities and créolité in the nuclearized Pacific,” French Studies, Oxford University Press, 72:3, 2018.

Julie T. Millard (Chemistry), Tina M. Beachy (Chemistry), Victoria L. Hepburn (Chemistry), Edmund J. Klinkerch (Chemistry), Jiayu Ye ’18, Tenzin Passang ’19, and Gabriel M. Kline ’19, “Genotype and Phenotype of Caffeine Metabolism: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment,” Journal of Chemical Education, 2018.

With Vanesa L. Silvestri ’12, “Changes in Apoptotic Gene Expression Induced by the DNA Cross-Linkers Epichlorohydrin and Diepoxybutane in Human Cell Lines,” Data in Brief 19, 932-935, 2018.

With Vanesa L. Silvestri ’12, Samuel C. Redstone ’15, Phuong M. Le ’17, and Jordanne B. Dunn, “Cross-Linking by Epichlorohydrin and Diepoxybutane Correlates with Cytotoxicity and Leads to Apoptosis in Human Leukemia (HL-60) Cells,” Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 352, 19-27, 2018.

Mouhamedoul Niang (French), “Global Capitalism, Multinational Corporations and The Creation of Identities in the Sahara: A Case Study of Idrissou Mora Kpai’s film Arlit, Deuxième Paris,” CELAAN (Revue du Centre d’Études des Littératures et des Arts d’Afrique du Nord), Volume 15, no. 2 and 3, 2018.

Véronique Plesch (Art), Laure Pressac, and others. “Espace et temps, individu et communauté: Le Graffiti comme parole collective,” Sur les murs: Histoire(s) de Graffitis, 74-78, 2018.

Debra Spark (English), “Buddy Up: Learning (More) from Chekhov,” The Writers’ Chronicle, 2018.

“Finish It, Finish It: Options for Ending a Story,” The Southern Review, 2018.

Scott Taylor (Mathematics) and Maggy Tomova, “Thin position for knots, links, and graphs in 3-manifolds,” Algebraic & Geometric Topology, Volume 18, Issue 3, 2018.

Sonja Thomas (Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies), “‘This is America’ and the Global Erasure of Black Vernacular Traditions,” ASAP/J, 2018.

Junji Yoshida (East Asian Studies), “Laughing in the Shadows of Empire: Humor in Yasujiro Ozu’s The Brother and Sister of the Toda Family (1941),” in Reorienting Ozu: A Master and His Influence, edited by Jinhee Choi, New York: Oxford University Press, 2018.