Book cover, Ben Lisle (American Studies) Modern Coliseum: Stadiums and American Culture University of Pennsylvania Press (2017)Ben Lisle (American Studies)
Modern Coliseum: Stadiums and American Culture
University of Pennsylvania Press (2017)

Lisle guides readers through the changes in stadium design since World War II, from urban ballparks like Ebbets Field and Fenway Park to the later iterations that turned from cities to the suburbs. In tracing this cultural change, Lisle examines the motivations and actions of professional sports teams, architects, and city officials. What emerges is cultural analysis of this long-overlooked architectural and social phenomenon, the evolution of which reflects, in grand scale, changes in American society.


Adrianna Paliyenko (French)
Genius Envy: Women Shaping French Poetic History, 1801-1900
Penn State University Press (2016)

Book cover, Adrianna Paliyenko (French) Genius Envy: Women Shaping French Poetic History, 1801-1900 Penn State University Press (2016)Where are the women in French poetry in the 19th century? In Genius Envy, Paliyenko restores them to their rightful place, tracing efforts by men of the time to marginalize women and diminish the importance of their work. Male thinkers, critics, and writers were part of a cultural effort to relegate women and their creative work by proclaiming that only men could carry the seed of true genius. This was a “scientific” theory of the time, one that linked the production of sperm cells to artistic creativity. Women, it was said, would reduce their reproductive capacity if they spent time and energy writing and reading. Paliyenko refreshes appreciation of the work and careers of five French women poets who challenged these notions and earned their place in literary history (see full story).


Jay Sibara (English) and Sarah Jacquette Ray
Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities
University of Nebraska Press (2017)

Book cover, Jay Sibara (English) and Sarah Jacquette Ray Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities University of Nebraska Press (2017)How does the environment affect the human body? What role does it have in disability and disability politics? Sibara and Ray’s volume Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities seeks to create a resource for undergraduate and graduate students that explores these questions from interdisciplinary perspectives. Beginning with several foundational essays to orient the reader in the environmental and disability discourse, Sibara and Ray include new essays and emerging voices on topics like food justice, health, and imperialism. In the initial essay, Ray dissects the image of the typical image of an outdoorsman–usually male and able bodied. In “Reification, Biomedicine, and Bombs: Women’s Politicization in Vieques’s Social Movement,” Victor M. Torres-Vélez investigates the female force behind health advocacy on the island of Vieques in the aftermath of its use as a facility for the U.S. military. Sibara and Ray weave together essays of many different topics and style to create a cohesive dialogue about the intersection of environment and disability politics.


Paula Harrington (English) and Ronald Jenn
Mark Twain & France: The Making of a New American Identity
University of Missouri Press (2017)

Book cover, Paula Harrington (English) and Ronald Jenn Mark Twain & France: The Making of a New American Identity University of Missouri Press (2017)Mark Twain is known for his writing about American life, in novels like The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Life on the Mississippi; however, despite his apparent distaste for the country, Harrington and Jenn argue that France was an important figure in his life and work, both as a place and a foundation for his own musings on American identity. The product of a Fulbright scholarship spent in Paris and a residency at Quarry Farm, the Clemens family’s New York summer home, Mark Twain & France: The Making of a New American Identity tracks and dissects the influence of France on the writer’s life and work.


Rosecrans Baldwin ’99
The Last Kid Left
MCD/Farrar, Straus, and Giroux (2017)

Book cover, Rosecrans Baldwin ’99 The Last Kid Left MCD/Farrar, Straus, and Giroux (2017)A car accident reveals two dead bodies, but the suspect’s story is a little too good to be true. The sheriff who brought him in believes he’s innocent, but will anyone else buy it? So begins Rosecrans Baldwin’s newest novel, The Last Kid Left, a crime novel told between flashbacks that illustrate coming of age in a small town, the difficulties of high school in a tech-savvy world, and the struggle of young love.


James Martin ’70, P’20 and James E. Samels
Consolidating Colleges and Merging Universities: New Strategies for Higher Education Leaders
Johns Hopkins University Press (2017)

Book cover, James Martin ’70, P’20 and James E. Samels Consolidating Colleges and Merging Universities: New Strategies for Higher Education Leaders Johns Hopkins University Press (2017)Since the economic downturn of 2008, some colleges and universities have looked for solutions to their own financial weakness. In this book, Martin and Samels, a professor of English and an attorney, respectively, bring together higher education leaders to consider what may previously been unthinkable: forming partnerships with their competitors. Many of those leaders share their experiences, hoping to help their peers negotiate challenging economic times. A practical guide to the downsizing of American education.


Richard J. Cass ’73
In Solo Time
Encircle Publications (2017)

Book cover, Richard J. Cass ’73 In Solo Time Encircle Publications (2017)Cass dives into the Boston bar scene with his novel In Solo Time. In this prequel to his first mystery, Solo Act, alcoholic bar owner Elder Darrow finds himself in the middle of an investigation when a performer is murdered in his bar’s bathroom. It’s par for the course at the Esposito, a Boston dive that Darrow hopes to turn into a jazz nightspot. As the police struggle to find leads, Darrow discovers his connections to the case run deep. Can he stop the killer before he strikes again (and again)? Lovers of noir fiction will be at home in this dark—and engaging— depiction of the mean streets of Boston.


Faculty Publications

Dave Angelini (Biology) and Will Simmons ’17J, “Chronic exposure to a neonicotinoid increases expression of antimicrobial peptide genes in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens,” Scientific Reports, March 2017.

Jacquelyn Ardam (English), “Aslant to the Flâneur: A Conversation with Lauren Elkin,” Public Books, July 2017.

Robert Gastaldo (Geology), “Paleontology Of The Blaauwater 67 And 65 Farms, South Africa: Testing The Daptocephalus/Lystrosaurus Biozone Boundary In A Stratigraphic Framework,” PALAIOS, v. 32, 349–366, 2017; Robert Gastaldo (Geology), Jiawen (June) Li ’16, Johann Neveling, and John W. Geissman, “Siltstones Across the Daptocephalus (Dicynodon) and Lystrosaurus Assemblage Zones, Karoo Basin, South Africa, Show No Evidence for Aridification,” Journal of Sedimentary Research, v. 87, 653-671, 2017.

Jill Gordon (Philosophy), “Black Bodies Matter: A Reading of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me,” Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal, Volume 38, Issue 1, 199-221, 2017.

Gary Green (Art), “Gary Green: New York 1976-1986,” photographs, Urbanautica Institute, 2017.

Daniel Harkett (Art) and Katie Hornstein coeditors, Horace Vernet and the Thresholds of Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture, University Press of New England, 2017.

Lauren McClenachan (Environmental Studies) coauthor, “Committing to socially responsible seafood,” Science, June 2, 2017.

Lydia Moland (Philosophy), “For Our Cause is Just,” Paris Review, July 2017. “Hegel’s Philosophy of Art,” chapter in Oxford Handbook of Hegel.  Edited by Dean Moyar, Oxford University Press, 2017 (559-580).

Philip Nyhus (Environmental Studies), Yue (Anna) Yu ’19, and Jiaqi (Carmen) Wu ’19, “Of Stripes and Spots: Can a Growing Dragon Save a Tiger?” China Policy Institute: Analysis, June 2017.

Tanya Sheehan (Art), Five-part series on photography and migration, posted to Still Searching, Fotomuseum blog, March and April 2017.

Judy Stone (Biology), Emily Arsenault ’14, Mary Furth Thomas ’15, Alice Hotopp ’15, Matthew Lipman ’15, Mackenzie Nichols ’14, and Margaret Parrish ’15, “Diversity of seeds captured by interception exceeds diversity of seeds deposited in traps,” Biotropica, April 2017.