Fall

AR477  On the Road: Pilgrim Culture   
Art – Plesch

PleschA study of journeys to a shrine or sacred place for spiritual and personal reward and of the artistic responses to those journeys. We shall investigate pilgrimage from ancient times through the Middle Ages and into the modern world, considering secular pilgrimages as well as religious ones, from Jerusalem, Rome, Mecca, and Compostela to Graceland. The seminar will include a weekend trip to the pilgrimage site of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré in Quebec. Previously offered as AR497 (Fall 2011). Four credit hours.

 AY341  Culture, Mobility, Identity: Encounters in the African Diaspora   
Anthropology/African American Studies – Bhimull

African DiasporaUse of text, film, food, and music to examine how African and African-descended people made and remade the modern world. Surveys how past and present cultural practices dialogically shaped the formation, transformation, and flows of the diaspora. Attention to the dynamics of circulation, contact, exchange, and estrangement facilitates travels through the Afro-Atlantic world. Inquiry into archives and other sites of memory enables consideration of the scale, scope, and impact of black action and imagination. Fulfills anthropology’s culture area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 112 or American Studies 276. Four credit hours.  S, I.

AY231  Caribbean Cultures   
Anthropology/African American Studies – Bhimull

Considers Caribbean people, places, products, and the webs of domination and resistance that formed and transformed the region and its diasporas. Ethnographies, films, food, music, memoir, and other texts tackle topics like empire building and dismantling; colonialism and postcolonialism; decolonization and displacement; development and underdevelopment; commodification and consumption; labor, revolution, and liberation. Cross-cultural and cross-temporal navigations develop an anthro-historical sensibility about the Caribbean’s pivotal place in the world. Also listed as African-American Studies 231. Fulfills anthropology’s culture area requirement. Prerequisite: Anthropology 112 or American Studies 276. Four credit hours.  I.

HI352  Asian Migrations   
History/East Asian Studies – LaCouture

asia-mapSince the Cold War, academics and policymakers have understood Asia as a map clearly delineated by the borders of modern nation-states and further divided into three Asias: South, Southeast, and East. Introduces migrations as a category of historical analysis to un-map Cold War-era understandings of Asia and generate a new trans-regional awareness of the Asian world. Examines the migrations of people, language and culture, capital, and things across Asia from early modern history through the Cold War. Students will engage with cutting-edge research on Asian migrations and contribute to this growing field with an original research project.Four credit hours.  H, I.

IS135   New York: Modern Global City   
American Studies & English – Burke, Lisle, McFadden

425px-Singer_Building_New_York_City_1908Focuses on New York City as an enormously influential place and a center of migration and immigration. Study and analysis of a range of cultural “texts” produced in and about New York, from literature to visual culture to the built environment; situating those works in larger historical, political, and economic contexts. Why do so many move to New York? What do they do when they arrive? How does New York serve as an economic and cultural control center in a globalized world? What might our focus on this city and its people teach us about the powerful forces that shape our worlds? An all-expenses-paid field trip to New York is central. See American Studies 135A and 135B and English 135 for course descriptions. Satisfies the First-Year Writing (W1), Historical Studies (H), Literature (L), and Social Science (S) requirements.     Twelve credit hours.  H, L, S, W1.

LT255  The Aeneid, Vergil’s Epic of Migration   
Classics – O’Neill

AeneasFleeingTroyFedericoFiori-Il-BarociGalleriaBorgheseRomeVergil sends Aeneas on a fantastic journey between imaginary homelands: a Troy that no longer stands, a Rome that does not yet exist. Even the Rome revealed to us through prophecy, necromancy, and divine decree does not seem recognizable. Who was Aeneas: exile or immigrant, refugee or colonizer? What can he tell us about Roman identity? Studying selections from the Aeneid and secondary literature will develop your abilities in language and in literary, historical, and cultural analysis. Together, students will create a website to present their original research and enhance their communication skills. Four credit hours.  L.

RE214  Global Sikhism: Migration and Identity   
Religious Studies – Singh

SinghA study of the South Asian immigration to North America through the lens of the Sikh community. How do Sikhs cope with racism, prejudice, and stereotyping in the new country? How do they deal with gender, sexuality, and transnationalism within their own community? How do they contribute to the political, social, and religious diversity of America? We will explore the themes of displacement, hybridization, multiculturalism, and postmodernity in film, art, literature, and Bollywood bhangra music and dance. The goal is to promote inter-cultural understanding and strengthen the diversity of our reality. Four credit hours.  I.

ST215  Weather, Climate, and Society   
Science, Technology, Society- Fleming

FlemingThis course will provide you with scientific and cultural introductions to the Earth’s atmosphere. Topics include the atmosphere’s composition, structure, and dynamics, severe storms, air pollution, ozone depletion, climate change, intellectual and social migrations, and weather and climate control. The course includes lectures, a midterm exam, a group poster project, a research paper, guest speakers, and special collaborations with the Museum of Art and TD258 Improvisational Dance. This course fulfills the non-lab natural science requirement and the STS 200-level science requirement. Four credit hours.  N.  

SO252  Race, Ethnicity, and Society
Sociology/African American Studies – Sherwood

An examination of the roles of race and ethnicity in organizing complex stratified societies, in structuring systems of durable inequalities, and in organizing and shaping communities and enclaves within stratified societies. Using multiple sociological perspectives on race, ethnicity, minority groups, prejudice, discrimination, and institutional racism, special attention is paid to the United States with reference to immigration, slavery, conquest, annexation, colonialism, internal migration, social conflict, social movements, labor, citizenship, transnational adaptation, law, and public policy. Prerequisite: Sociology 131 or 231 or American Studies 276 or Anthropology 112. Four credit hours.  U.

WG493: Identity Formations: Transnational Feminisms
Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies – Thomas

ThomasBeginning in the 1990s, feminist scholarship was transformed by the rise of transnational feminisms.  Transnational feminists called for a more global approach, recognizing the flow of mobile capital, the migrations of peoples and the links between nationalisms and religious fundamentalisms worldwide.  Today, feminist thought has been profoundly influenced by this transnational feminist scholarship. Studies on migration and border crossing, trafficking, asylum, global capital, feminist organizing and activism across nation-state boundaries, and a host of other transnational feminist work has emerged and now dominates the discipline of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies.  In this seminar, students will learn not only the beginnings of transnational feminist critique, but also the new trends in the discipline of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies.  We will use transnational feminisms to examine the ways in which global religiosity, transnational class, migration, global cities, tourism, trafficking, international law and feminist organizing across borders has led to questions and critiques of how feminist scholarship understands the object, subject and audience of feminist theory and activism. Four credit hours.


Jan Plan

AR293  Asian Museum Workshop: Chinese Artists in Maine   
Art – Weitz

DSCN1355A hands-on, collaborative workshop in which students create a museum or virtual Web exhibition. Students learn about the topic through readings, lectures, presentations, and writing assignments. They then begin their collaboration, with the entire class making all decisions. Students jointly produce a grant proposal, press release, object labels, catalogue, and educational component. The exhibition opens the last day of Jan Plan with a student-led public presentation. The scale of the project and the student-driven process demand a great commitment of time and energy, but the long hours yield a tangible product that remains on display for weeks, months, or years. Topic for 2015: “Chinese Artists in Maine” at Common Street Arts Gallery. Three credit hours.

AY274  Africans in America: The New Diaspora   
Anthropology/African American Studies – Besteman

African DiasporaAfrican immigration to the United States, while still small, has grown dramatically during the past few decades. The new African diaspora is characterized by family networks that span the Atlantic, by struggles within these networks about cultural heritage, authenticity, language politics, and intergenerational relations, by questions about responsibility and obligation across borders, and by complicated identity issues of race and belonging. We will examine these questions through reading novels, essays, and ethnography and by engaging the ways in which these issues are represented in film, music, and art produced by Africans in the new diaspora, and with guest speakers. Three credit hours.  S, U.


Spring

AR498  Photography and Migration   
Art/American Studies – Sheehan

Lange_Meeting of the Mothers ClubThis Humanities Lab will explore the complex relations between human migration and photography. Since the 19th century, photography has been used to document, enable, or control the movement of people across geographical and cultural borders. Both art photographers and snapshooters have attempted to put a face on immigration around the world, making visible its associations with transition, displacement, hardship, and opportunity. In addition to engaging with current scholarship, students will work with photographs in Special Collections at Miller Library, the Colby College Museum of Art, the Maine Historical Society, and the Waterville Historical Society. They will also develop a research project involving their own family photographs and photographs of local immigrant communities. Prerequisite: An American studies or art course. Four credit hours.  U.

ES276  Exploring the Anthropocene: Human Impacts on Global Ecosystems   
Environmental Studies – Bruesewitz

BruesewitzHuman activities are changing the environment in ways so numerous and extensive that some scientists have proposed we are in a new geological epoch, the “Anthropocene,” defined by human impacts on the landscape and ecosystem function. Through lectures, discussions, group projects, and laboratory exercises students will examine key elements of global ecosystem function, investigate how human activities have altered global ecosystems since the Industrial Revolution, and critically assess scientific evidence for anthropogenic changes. Global climate change will be investigated and placed in a broader context of anthropogenic change. We will also examine the concepts of tipping points to navigate future life in the Anthropocene.Four credit hours.  N-Lb.

HI184  History of the Modern Middle East   
History – Turner

arab-modern-tradition-story-topThe history of the Middle East from the post-Suleymanic Ottoman Empire to the present. Examines the fall of the Ottoman and Safavid empires, the rise of Western dominance, the struggle for independence, attempts at reform, the Arab-Israeli conflict, oil, the Iranian revolution, the Gulf War, the rise of Islamist movements, and ongoing repercussions. Particular focus on the interplay between religion and politics and the nature of power and authority. Designed to give the historical background necessary for understanding current events in the Middle East in their proper context. Four credit hours.  H, I.

HI283  Golden Diaspora: Modern Jewish History   
History/ African American Studies – Weisbrot

new-york-ghettoAn exodus from Jewish ghettos of Eastern Europe began just as Orthodox Judaism and communal traditions were buckling, and alternative paths to modernity and equality such as socialism, Zionism, secular learning, labor solidarity, and religious reform were surging. Through readings in primary and scholarly sources, the course will help students understand American history, Jewish history, and the history of immigration in relation to each other, and hone students’ ability to read critically, articulate sustained arguments, and write clearly, concisely, and precisely. Four credit hours.  H, U.

HI389  History of Iran   
History – Turner

1024px-Flag_of_Iran.svgFocus on the cultural, social, and political development of Iran from the rise of the Safavid dynasty to the election of Muhammad Khatami in 1997. Particular points of focus: state formation, the influence of the West on 19th-century economic and intellectual development, 20th-century internal struggles between the religious and political elite, the effects of oil and great power intervention, the rise of activist Islam and the revolution, the war with Iraq, and life after Khomeini. Four credit hours.  H, I.

LT354: Seneca’s Medea
Classics – Barrett

Lucanian Calyx-Krater, ca. 400 BC Courtesy Cleveland Museum of Art (www.clevelandart.org)

One of the most prominent exiles of ancient Greek myth, Medea came to Greece from her native land of Colchis on the eastern shore of the Black Sea. An exemplary ’barbarian Other’ of ancient Greek and Roman thought, she brought with her an esoteric knowledge of magic and a moral outlook that shocked the ‘civilized’ world. Marked for exile once more (from Corinth this time) following her abandonment by Jason, Medea found revenge in killing her, and Jason’s, children. Her story is one of romance, betrayal and revenge grafted onto a tale about geographical displacement, exile, and cultural difference. Seneca’s 1st-century CE tragedy tells this ancient (Greek) story in a new (Roman) way, one that makes sense of the myth in terms that speak directly about Rome—a city founded by exiles—and about Rome’s imperial project. Four credit hours. L

MU222  Maine’s Musical Soundscapes: Ethnography of Maine   
Music/Anthropology – Zelensky

Fiddleicious_DonRoyWhat are the musical cultures outside of Colby College and what are the communities making this music?  This course engages this question through direct interaction and observation of Maine’s communities.  Students will learn ethnographic field methods and will take fieldtrips throughout the semester to conduct interviews at sites that make up the rich tapestry of Maine’s soundscape, including local Waterville establishments and within the Penobscot, Lebanese, Somali, Russian, and French-Canadian communities (the group under study will rotate on a yearly basis).  We will focus on the French Canadian community in Spring 2015.  The culminating project in this course will be a short documentary filmed based on material students gathered in their fieldwork. As a part of this class, we will discuss and consider issues of representation and of going out into the field.  It is important to recognize that our fieldwork process entails an opportunity to build bridges with the community under examination as well as to develop a transparent and mutually beneficial relationship with our consultants. Four credit hours.  A.

RE221  The Jews of Maine   
Jewish Studies/Religious Studies – Freidenreich

FreidenreichMaine is home to a noteworthy yet under-researched Jewish community with deep historical roots. Participants in this civic engagement humanities lab will advance scholarly and popular understanding of the experiences of Jews in Maine past and present by producing essays and talks based on original archival research or fieldwork. Students will develop research and communications skills and gain a richer understanding of Jewish life in small-town America. They may also help to strengthen Maines Jewish communities through their research. The research focus of this course varies; the 2015 theme is Jewish migration to and from Maine. Four credit hours.  H.

WG493: Identity Formations: Transnational Feminisms
Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies – Thomas

ThomasBeginning in the 1990s, feminist scholarship was transformed by the rise of transnational feminisms.  Transnational feminists called for a more global approach, recognizing the flow of mobile capital, the migrations of peoples and the links between nationalisms and religious fundamentalisms worldwide.  Today, feminist thought has been profoundly influenced by this transnational feminist scholarship. Studies on migration and border crossing, trafficking, asylum, global capital, feminist organizing and activism across nation-state boundaries, and a host of other transnational feminist work has emerged and now dominates the discipline of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies.  In this seminar, students will learn not only the beginnings of transnational feminist critique, but also the new trends in the discipline of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies.  We will use transnational feminisms to examine the ways in which global religiosity, transnational class, migration, global cities, tourism, trafficking, international law and feminist organizing across borders has led to questions and critiques of how feminist scholarship understands the object, subject and audience of feminist theory and activism. Four credit hours.