Graphic Matters: George Bellows and World War I

February 9, 2017 - September 3, 2017

Gourley Gallery

Of the more than 170 lithographs that American artist George Bellows (1882–1925) produced between 1916 and 1924, twenty belong to his “War Series.” Graphic Matters reflects on the centennial of American entry into World War I by reexamining Bellows’s prints for the timely questions they raise about representation, aestheticized and institutionalized violence, nationalism, and masculinity.

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No Limits: Zao Wou-Ki

February 4, 2017 - June 4, 2017

Lower Jette Galleries, Upper Jette Galleries

No Limits: Zao Wou-Ki is the first American retrospective of this pioneering Chinese-French artist. Zao Wou-Ki (1920-2013) immigrated to Paris in 1948 and soon took the international art world by storm. Renowned for the fluidity with which he moved between European modernism and Chinese aesthetics, Zao’s work is distinguished by his unique approach to abstraction.

No Limits: Zao Wou-Ki is co-organized by the Colby College Museum of Art and Asia Society Museum, New York. The exhibition is cocurated by Dr. Melissa Walt, Research Associate, Colby College; Dr. Ankeney Weitz, Ellerton M. and Edith K. Jetté Professor of Art, Colby College; and Michelle Yun, Senior Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art, Asia Society.

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Since 1961 the character of Zé Carioca has starred in a series of wildly popular Brazilian comic books, which artist Rivane Neuenschwander (b. 1967) grew up reading. This complex figure—conceived as an instrument of capitalist diplomacy but by now also a national symbol—has inspired several bodies of her work.

Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York; Galeria Fortes Vilaca, Sao Paulo; and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London.

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Highlights from the Permanent Collection

The Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion, Lunder Wing

This exhibition showcases the reinstallation of the Museum’s permanent collection galleries and the integration of works from the Lunder Collection with the Museum’s core holdings. Supported by the Henry Luce Foundation, this display reflects the Museum’s ongoing commitment to a comprehensive representation of American art from the nineteenth century through the present.

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