Picasso: The Vollard Suite

June 2, 2016 - August 21, 2016

Davis Gallery

Selections from Pablo Picasso’s Vollard Suite—the artist’s most significant cycle of etchings and a hallmark of twentieth century modernist printmaking —will be on view to celebrate the recent gift of the entire suite by Peter and Paula Lunder. Colby’s Vollard Suite is one of fifty deluxe sets that was printed on extra-large Montval paper in 1939 and is believed to be one of only eight deluxe sets that Picasso signed in full.

The Vollard Suite comprises 100 etchings made at a critical point in Picasso’s career between 1930 and 1937. Exploring themes of mythology, identity, creativity and sexuality, the Vollard Suite is etched in a neoclassical style that Picasso adapted from his studies of classical sculpture and traces his artistic development throughout the 1930s. In the series, Picasso eroticizes the relationship between the artist, model, and art, casting himself in the role of the sculptor pictured throughout. Set primarily in the artist’s studio, Picasso mixes images of artistic repose and reflection with sexual fantasy and conquest. The set shifts from works of serene contemplation of beauty drawn with a graceful, simple line to images of aggression, animalistic desire, and torment that are aggressively etched and heavily work. An unresolved drama between tranquility and agony, power and impotence, classical harmony and the irrational forces of the human psyche, plays itself out in the series.

A longtime patron and promoter of Picasso’s, Ambroise Vollard, a leading avant-garde art dealer and publisher in Paris, commissioned the work that led to the Vollard Suite. Although the exact arrangements surrounding the commission are not known, Picasso began the earliest work from the suite in 1930 and produced the majority of the prints in 1933-34. After completing 97 etchings, he included three portraits of Vollard to round the set up to 100 and handed over the plates to the dealer-publisher in 1937. Vollard hired Richard Lacouière to print them in 1939, but the unexpected death of Vollard that year and the outbreak of World War II prevented the sets from being published. In the late 1940s, the art dealer Henri Petiet purchased all of the etchings from Vollard’s brother. Colby’s deluxe set comes directly from the Petiet estate and has never before been publicly exhibited.


Banner Image: Pablo Picasso, Minotaure aveugle guidé par une filette dans la nuit (Blind Minotaur Led by a Little Girl in the Night), 1934. Etching, 15 3/16 x 19 13/16 in. (38.7 x 50.4 cm). Colby College Museum of Art. The Lunder Collection, 006.2016. Photo by Gary Green. © 2016 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

A Usable Past: American Folk Art at the Colby College Museum of Art

July 9, 2016 - January 8, 2017

Lower Jetté Galleries, Upper Jetté Galleries

A Usable Past brings together paintings, sculptures, and works on paper by self-trained artists working in the eastern part of what is now the United States during the long nineteenth century. Produced and originally circulated outside the elite sphere of fine art, these objects emerged from vernacular traditions that favored decorative aesthetics over mimesis. In the twentieth century, artists, scholars, and collectors came to believe that artworks like these expressed such supposedly quintessential American values as industriousness and ingenuity, and that they also served as native precursors to Modernism. A Usable Past features highlights of the Museum’s extensive holdings of folk art of the United States supplemented by loans from distinguished New England collections. The exhibition includes many artworks from the American Heritage collection of Edith and Ellerton Jette–one of the earliest collections to enter the Colby College Museum of Art.


Banner Image: Thomas Chambers, Landscape, c. 1830, oil on canvas, 24 1/2 x 30 1/2 in. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Ellerton M. Jetté, 1956.086