Torkwase Dyson: Nautical Dusk

October 4, 2018 - January 6, 2019

William D. Adams Gallery

Nautical Dusk, a new project by visual artist Torkwase Dyson, is structured as an invitation to examine how physics metaphors function in relationship to geography, science, and architecture. Dyson will construct a group of architectural sculptures that ask us to consider the physics of atmospheric light, scalar space, and intuition in the wake of a changing climate.

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currents 8: Carly Glovinski

September 25, 2018 - February 17, 2019

Gladys Brooks Foundation Gallery, Gourley Gallery

For the eighth installment of the currents series, Carly Glovinski has created a two-part exhibition that will be shown concurrently at the Colby Museum and the Waterville Public Library. Presented alongside her installations of painted, cast, and woven sculptures will be contextual source material, including artworks from the Lunder Collection and library books awaiting readers.

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Darkness Visible: Goya Prints from the Lunder Collection

September 13, 2018 - January 20, 2019

Lower Jette Galleries

In the last years of the eighteenth century, the Spanish artist Francisco Goya (1746–1828) conceived a series of prints guided solely, he professed, by his imagination. Los Caprichos, or the Caprices, is the whimsical title Goya gave to his project, yet the series’ images are far from lighthearted. For Goya, an artist beholden to the Spanish court, printmaking was a means of elucidating the human condition on his own terms during an era of revolution and tumult. This focused exhibition of Goya prints from the Lunder Collection includes Los Caprichos and, until October 28, Los Disparates, or the Follies, also known by the posthumous title Los Proverbios, or the Proverbs, a work likewise suffused with a visionary darkness.

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Nancy Spero: Unbound

September 13, 2018 - January 20, 2019

Lower Jette Galleries

For more than five decades, Nancy Spero (1926–2009) pioneered a feminist art practice that fiercely defied the social expectations imposed on women. Using a lexicon of appropriated imagery, Spero envisioned, as she observed in 1987, “all manner of processions, conflicts, interruptions and disruptions.” Her hybrid artworks made in protest against war and in celebration of the liberated female body constitute Nancy Spero: Unbound, an exhibition organized in conjunction with a concurrent presentation of Francisco Goya’s prints, which Spero first encountered as an aspiring young artist.

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