Virtual Events

Upcoming Events

Virtual Artful Movements: Time to Connect

Saturday, March 6, 1:00 p.m.

Practice a series of gentle yoga poses inspired by artworks in the galleries. Our Artful Movements sessions begin with a deeper look at an artwork, followed by yoga and meditation led by Kathleen Leisure Haberstock of School Street Yoga. In this Artful Movements session, we will be inspired by Ana Mendieta’s Silueta Sangrienta, 1975, and we will explore Fish Pose (Matsyasana). Read more.

Virtual Artful Meditation: Time to Connect

Wednesday, March 10, 4:00 p.m.

Experience greater mind-body connection though our Artful Meditation program. During this session, Jing Ye, a meditation teacher and a counselor at Colby College, will guide participants through a meditation inspired by Ana Mendieta’s Silueta Sangrienta, 1975. Read more.

Virtual Artful Healing: Time to Connect

Monday, March 15, Noon

Practice a series of hands-on activities inspired by artworks in the galleries. In our Artful Healing sessions, Bodhi Simpson, LCPC, ATR, an art therapist with a private practice in Waterville, Maine, called Conscious Art Therapy will gently guide participants through a creative healing exercise inspired by a work of art in the Museum’s collection. This offering will support the development of creative expression, increase your self-awareness, and teach you simple tools to support your emotional wellbeing. This month’s exercise is inspired by Ana Mendieta’s Silueta Sangrienta,1975. Read more.

What is Missing?  Virtual Information Session

Wednesday, March 24, 7–7:30 p.m.

Join Colby College Museum of Art and Lunder Institute for American Art staff for a virtual Zoom conversation to learn how you can be a part of What is Missing?, artist Maya Lin’s “last memorial.” This project involves creating science-based artworks that include stories about environmental changes witnessed in the places where we live. Maya Lin is a Lunder Institute senior fellow during the 2020–21 academic year. Museum staff will explain how anyone can contribute to Lin’s “map of memories” by interviewing people in their communities to uncover local narratives about endangered species and habitat loss. Pre-register to receive your Zoom invitation here.


Past Events

Art + Conversation: Roy Lichtenstein: History in the Making 1948–1960

Watch a pre-recorded conversation between Elizabeth Finch and Marshall N. Price, co-curators of Roy Lichtenstein: History in the Making, 1948–1960. They will discuss the little-known early career of the Pop art legend and their collaborative work on this groundbreaking exhibition, which begins its national tour at the Colby College Museum of Art.

Virtual Artful Movements: Time to Face Yourself

Practice a series of gentle yoga poses inspired by artworks in the galleries. Our Artful Movementssessions begin with a deeper look at an artwork, followed by yoga and meditation led by Kathleen Leisure Haberstock of School Street Yoga. In this Artful Movements session, we will be inspired by Glenn Ligon’s Palindrome #1, 2007, and we will explore Mountain Pose (Tadasana). Read more!

Virtual Artful Meditation: Time to Face Yourself

Experience greater mind-body connection though our Artful Meditation program. During this session, Jing Ye, a meditation teacher and a counselor at Colby College, will guide participants through a meditation inspired by Glenn Ligon’s Palindrome #1, 2007. Read more!

Virtual Artful Healing: Time to Face Yourself

Practice a series of hands-on activities inspired by artworks in the galleries. In our Artful Healingsessions, Bodhi Simpson, LCPC, ATR, an art therapist with a private practice in Waterville, Maine, called Conscious Art Therapy will gently guide participants through a creative healing exercise inspired by a work of art in the Museum’s collection. This offering will support the development of creative expression, increase your self-awareness, and teach you simple tools to support your emotional wellbeing. This month’s exercise is inspired by Glenn Ligon’s Palindrome #1, 2007. Read more!

A Conversation with the Colby Museum’s New Director

Carolyn Muzzy Director of Colby College Museum of Art Jacqueline Terrassa shared the bold vision for the Colby Museum in a conversation on Jan. 21 with Julia Lo ’14, Museum Board of Governors member, former Colby Museum intern, and current programs manager at the Vilcek Foundation. Watch now!

Virtual Artful Healing: Time to Move

The natural state of life is a continual process of movement. During this Artful Healing offering, we will come together to connect more deeply to the rhythm within ourselves and expand into an awareness of our interconnectedness with the rhythm of life.

Inner Music, created by Richmond Barthé, offers us an entry point into the theme of movement and connects us to the rhythm within and around us. We will practice our own Creative Movement Visual Meditation, a creative process that allows us to open ourselves to a deep experience. Watch now!

Virtual Artful Meditation: Time to Move

In Artful Meditation, a new Let Art Inspire wellness series, Jing Ye, a meditation teacher and a counselor at Colby College, will guide participants through a 30-minute meditation session inspired by a work in the Museum’s collection, fostering greater mind-body connection. In this session, we’ll ground our thoughts with the help of Richmond Barthé’s Inner Music (c. 1956). Watch now!

Virtual Artful Movements: Time to Move

Richmond Barthé’s sculpture Inner Music (c. 1956) depicts a dancer in motion, capturing a moment of grace and precision. Looking downward with a solemn face, the dancer seems to be immersed in his artistic expression. The yoga pose of focus for this session is thus the dance pose (natarajasana). This yoga pose will allow participants to experience a sense of harmony and balance that is crucial to dance. Watch now! 

Virtual Artful Movements: Time to Flow

In the 1960s, Florida’s meandering Kissimmee River was forcefully constrained to a straight channel, resulting in detrimental impacts on the surrounding environment. In response, artist Maya Lin, currently a Lunder Institute for American Art Senior Fellow, mapped the the complexity of the river’s former course using hundreds of pushpins inserted directly into the gallery wall.

The cobra pose that is central to this month’s yoga session will prompt participants to roll back their shoulders and open up their hearts while lying on the floor, imitating the curved form of the river. Watch now!

Virtual Artful Meditation: Time to Flow

In this Artful Meditation, Jing Ye, a meditation teacher and a counselor at Colby College, guides us through a meditation that will ground our thoughts, inspired by Maya Lin Pin River-Kissimmee, 2008, fostering greater mind-body connection.

In the 1960s, Florida’s meandering Kissimmee River was forcefully constrained to a straight channel, resulting in detrimental impacts on the surrounding environment. In response, artist Maya Lin, currently a Lunder Institute for American Art Senior Fellow, mapped the complexity of the river’s original course using hundreds of push pins inserted directly into the gallery wall. Watch now!

Virtual Artful Healing: Time to Flow

Learn how to enter into the state of “flow” through the creative process. This month’s artwork Pin River-Kissimmee, created by artist Maya Lin, invites in the element of water and the metaphor of the expansive, flowing river. Flow state is a common experience during artmaking and is important for your mental and emotional health.

Through this creative process we will learn how to open to and experience surrender in order to allow the natural flow of life to propel us forward, rather than needing to force or control. To achieve this, we will engage in our own Creative Flow Painting Meditation. No previous artistic experience necessary. Watch now!

Virtual Art + Conversation: Another World is Possible

Watch Elizabeth Jabar, inaugural Director of Civic Engagement and Community Partnerships at Colby College, and co-founder of Hinge Collaborative, and Olivia Fountain, Anne Lunder Leland Curatorial Fellow at Colby College Museum of Art in a pre-recorded discussion on the centennial year of the 19th amendment and the evolution of voting rights through Jabar’s Another World is Possible print currently on view in Davis Gallery. To learn more about Hinge Collaborative and their programs please visit their website. Watch now!

Virtual Artful Healing: Time to Let Go

During each Artful Healing session, art therapist Bodhi Simpson will gently guide participants through a 30-minute creative healing exercise inspired by a work in the Museum’s collection under a monthly theme. This offering will support the development of creative expression, increase your self-awareness, and teach you simple tools to support your emotional wellbeing.

This month’s Artful Healing offering is inspired by Martin Puryear’s Up and Over (2014). Watch now. 

Lunder Institute Talks: Tanya Sheehan with Hank Willis Thomas and Eric Gottesman

The Lunder Institute Talks are a series of live, hour-long Zoom conversations with scholars and artists who are shaping the field of American art. Together, Lunder Institute area directors (Daisy Desrosiers, Theaster Gates, and Tanya Sheehan) and invited guests will explore contemporary questions through artistic practice. Each conversation will engage with artworks and/or ongoing projects related to the Colby Museum, including work by the invited artists.

Hank Willis Thomas and Eric Gottesman are cofounders of For Freedoms, an artist-run initiative to merge political and artistic discourse, which was awarded the 2017 ICP Infinity Award for New Media and Online Platform. Watch now. 

Virtual Artful Meditation: Time to Let Go

In Artful Meditation, a new Let Art Inspire wellness series, Jing Ye, a meditation teacher and a counselor at Colby College, will guide participants through a 30-minute meditation session inspired by a work in the Museum’s collection, fostering greater mind-body connection.

In this session, we’ll ground our thoughts with the help of Martin Puryear’s Up and Over (2014). Read more.

Virtual Artful Movements: Time to Let Go

Artful Movements provides an opportunity to practice a series of gentle yoga poses inspired by artworks in the galleries. These free sessions begin with a deeper look at an artwork, followed by a series of gentle poses and meditation led by Kathleen Leisure Haberstock of School Street Yoga.

In this Artful Movements session, we will be inspired by Martin Puryear’s Up and Over (2014), and will explore Adho mukha svanasana (downward facing dog pose). Watch here! 

Virtual Artful Healing: Time to Ground Yourself

Art therapist Bodhi Simpson will gently guide participants through a 30-minute creative healing exercise inspired by a work in the Museum’s collection under a monthly theme. This offering will support the development of creative expression, increase your self-awareness, and teach you simple tools to support your emotional wellbeing.This month’s Artful Healing offering is inspired by Theresa Secord’s Penobscot Barrel (2019). Grounded in nature, this beautiful Penobscot Barrel was handmade with strips of sweetgrass, ash, and cedar bark. These plants are woven together a container to provide a safe, nurturing space where we can connect more deeply to ourselves and to the Earth. Using our imaginations and the creative process, we will learn how to create and work with our own Grounding Tree Painting, cultivating the experience of being mindful and present in our physical bodies. Watch here!

Lunder Institute Talks: Daisy Desrosiers with Naeem Mohaiemen

The Lunder Institute Talks are a series of live, hour-long Zoom conversations with scholars and artists who are shaping the field of American art. Together, Lunder Institute area directors (Daisy Desrosiers, Theaster Gates, and Tanya Sheehan) and invited guests will explore contemporary questions through artistic practice. Each conversation will engage with artworks and/or ongoing projects related to the Colby Museum, including work by the invited artists.

Naeem Mohaiemen combines films, installations, and essays to research socialist utopia, malleable borders, and rhizomatic families. Mohaiemen is author of Prisoners of Shothik Itihash (Kunsthalle Basel, 2014), and co-editor with Eszter Szakacs of Solidarity Must be Defended (Tranzit, forthcoming). He is a 2020–21 Senior Fellow at the Lunder Institute for American Art, 2020–23 Mellon Fellow at Columbia University, and is on the Advisory Board of the Vera List Center for Art & Politics at the New School in New York. Watch now!

Virtual Artful Meditation: Time to Ground Yourself

In Artful Meditation, a new Let Art Inspire wellness series, Jing Ye, a meditation teacher and a counselor at Colby College, will guide participants through a meditation session inspired by a work in the Museum’s collection, fostering greater mind-body connection. In this session, we’ll ground our thoughts with the help of Theresa Secord’s Penobscot Barrel (2019). Watch now!

Virtual Artful Movements: Time to Ground Yourself

In this Artful Movements session, we will remove the toxins and waste in our systems that interfere with our self-improvement and growth. Inspired by Theresa Secord’s Penobscot Barrel (2019), made of natural materials and grounded in a traditional practice, we will explore Raised Hands Pose (Urdhva Hastasana), sometimes called Talasana, or the Palm Tree Pose. Like Penobscot Barrel, this pose resonates with the natural world. By connecting with nature, we will prepare our “barrels” for an abundance of health and vitality. Watch now!

Virtual Art + Conversation with Kifah Abdulla

Portland-based artist, poet, writer, performer, teacher, and activist Kifah Abdulla will demonstrate Arabic calligraphy and share the story of how he incorporates calligraphy into his own work. Originally from Iraq, Kifah lived for many years as a refugee in Jordan and Holland before becoming a U.S. citizen. This program is related to  The Sea in a Jug: The Welch Collection of Islamic and Later Indian Art. Watch now!

Sailors’ Souvenirs: Cultural Appropriation Across the Globe

Sarah Timm, Manager of Interpretation at the Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, Maine, discusses objects from MMM’s collection that were collected by Maine captains and crews during their stops in ports around the world, as many objects transformed in meaning and function once they came back to America.

This talk is presented in conjunction with the Colby Museum exhibition Hew Locke: Here’s the Thing. Watch now!

Virtual Artful Movements @ Home: Find Your Inner Self

Louise Nevelson’s Standing Figure (Proud Oriental Figure) is a sculpture made of terracotta, a type of ceramic, and the Eagle yoga pose alludes to its physical form. To create the yoga pose, one must sculpt one’s own body, moulding oneself into an upright posture by crossing arms and legs while standing. Watch here.

Lunder Institute Student Research Assistant Roundtable

Colby students who served as research assistants for the Lunder Institute for American Art in 2019–20 share their experiences working for the Institute’s inaugural cohort of Research Fellows. Watch here.

Virtual Artful Movements @ Home: Let It Bloom

Colored Vases, 2006-2008 uses Neolithic pottery (5000-3000 B.C.E.), represents a pivotal development in the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s exploration of sculpture as a medium for social and political criticism. The garland pose alludes to the shape of the vases and when practicing yoga one can strengthen their mind-body connection which in turn prompts one’s understanding of themselves on a deeper level. Watch here.

Virtual Art + Conversation: River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames

Justin McCann, Lunder Curator for Whistler Studies at the Colby College Museum of Art, offers a virtual tour of the River Works: Whistler and the Industrial Thames exhibition, featuring a series of works created during the artist’s time living in Victorian London environs. Justin sheds a light on the environmental hazards of air pollution and “Great Stinks” apparent in Whistler’s depictions of the working waterfront. Watch here.

Virtual Art + Conversation: Hew Locke: Here’s The Thing

Sarah Duff, assistant professor of history, and Diana Tuite, Katz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, discuss the Queen Victoria figurehead and British imperialism in relation to the Hew Locke: Here’s The Thing exhibition. Watch here.

Virtual Artful Movements @ Home: Strengthen Your Inner Calm

Marsden Hartley is a Maine-born artist. His painting Late Fall, Maine conveys a cool calmness and is evocative of his continued artistic exploration of nature. The Tree yoga pose alludes to the sturdy trees depicted and helps build the strength of the body core, encouraging one to strengthen their inner calm. Watch here.

Virtual Art + Conversation: SEED-O-MATIC

Spring is the perfect time to start a garden. The SEED-O-MATIC, the world’s slowest vending machine, can help—even in the age of social distancing. Developed by the Center for Genomic Gastronomy and stocked with help from our partners at Fedco Seeds, this machine makes locally-produced seeds available as part of its mission to promote agricultural biodiversity and seed sovereignty. With our relationship to food supplies affected by the spread of COVID-19, and local, state, and national organizers reimagining food distribution systems, how does something like the SEED-O-MATIC take on new resonance? Olivia Fountain, the Museum’s Anne Lunder Leland Curatorial Fellow, speaks about the SEED-O-MATIC and answer questions. Watch here.

Jessamine Batario: The New Social Environment Lunchtime Conversations

In response to the imminent crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic, The Brooklyn Rail shifted its operations online. These daily Social Environment lunchtime conversations provide a place to have vibrant conversations in a time of great social distancing. Here Phong H. Bui hosts art historian and March Guest Critic Jessamine Batario, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for Artistic and Scholarly Engagement and Programs at our Lunder Institute for American Art, for a conversation on the social, philosophical, and performative resonances of walking. Watch here. 

Lunder Institute Research Symposium: Art by African Americans

On Friday, March 13, 2020, the Lunder Institute for American Art hosted a research symposium on art by African Americans. This live-streamed, daylong event featured work-in-progress presentations by the six 2019-2020 Lunder Institute Research Fellows, discussions moderated by Distinguished Scholar Tanya Sheehan, and a roundtable with leading scholars focused on questions about the state of the field. Watch here.

Hew Locke: Here’s the Thing

On February 20, 2020, London-based artist Hew Locke offered a talk at the Colby College Museum of Art for the opening of Here’s the Thing, the most comprehensive exhibition of his work to date. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1959, but raised in Guyana—a British colony until 1970—Locke often sailed between the UK and South America during his childhood. Across a wide range of media, he considers the maritime vectors of mercantilism, colonialism, post-colonialism, migration, and diaspora. Watch here.