Spring 2017

Saturday, Feb. 25, 7:30 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building

(Funded in part by the Hazel Hoyt Witherell Memorial Concert Fund)
Described by the New York Times as a “virtuoso playing at the edge” and “a technologically fearless violinist,” Mari Kimura, director of Atlantic Music Festival’s Future Music Lab, will perform her own compositions that integrate interactive computer as well as pieces composed for her. These works demonstrate the living tradition of classical instrumental performance, deploying new music technologies available. Kimura will also demonstrate and perform interactive audio/video work using her latest motion-sensor project, μgic.


Video – The Tradition of Creation: Mari Kimura

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Jinwook Park, director
Eunae Koh, violin soloist
Saturday, March 11, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Boston-based violin virtuoso Eunae Koh joins the CSO in the haunting and poetic violin concerto by American composer Samuel Barber. The concert also features the world premiere of an interactive work for computer and orchestra by composer and Colby Music Professor Jonathan Hallstrom. Felix Mendelssohn’s fifth symphony, “Reformation,” closes the program with a tribute to Martin Luther’s well-known chorale “Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott” (“A Mighty Fortress is Our God”).


Video – Barber Violin Concerto

Colby Wind Ensemble, Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, April 1, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Coming-of-age stories, family entertainment, satire as commentary—all inspire composers to write and audiences to engage. The Colby Wind Ensemble celebrates music that captures the imagination with works that include Satiric Dances for a Comedy by Aristophanes and Fantasies on a Theme for Band by Haydn, both by Norman Della Joio, and film scores including theme music from Doctor Who by Ron Grainer and The Hobbit by Howard Shore.


Video – Satire, Fantasy, and Fiction

Thursday, April 6, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

(Funded in part by the Freda M. Charles Music Fund)

Yoko Hiraoka is a master of Japanese traditional stringed instruments and vocal styles whose performing career spans more than 30 years. Hiraoka returns to Colby to sing and play highlights of famous music for the biwa (four-stringed lute). The Tale of the Heike is a lyrical account of tragic medieval revolutionary battles between rival samurai (warrior) clans competing to replace the Japanese emperor with their own military rule. With rapturous poetry, soaring vocal lines, and virtuosic technical demands, Tale of the Heike is a true monument of Japanese musical art.

Colby College Chorale and Chamber Choir and Bowdoin Chamber Choir, Jesse Wakeman, director
Saturday, April 8, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Join the Colby College Chorale and Chamber Choir in collaboration with the Bowdoin Chamber Choir as they herald the spring season with joyous song. The program features works inspired by the warmth and vigor of springtime, with selections that celebrate the joys of life and love and the beauty of nature. Works include “A Jubilant Song” by René Clausen, “All Things Bright and Beautiful” by John Rutter, “If Music Be the Food of Love” by Jean Belmont, and more.


Video – Jubilant Spring!

Colby Jazz Band, Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, April 15, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center

Since the 1950s jazz has been infused with influences from soul, gospel, Afro-Cuban, and Brazilian styles. For its spring concert the Colby Jazz Band presents an eclectic program of varied styles, such as hard bop, R&B, gospel, and funk. Works include “Sister Sadie” by Horace Silver, “My Jelly Soul” by Charles Mingus, and many more.

David Hyun-su Kim, fortepiano
Lauren Basney, violin
Thursday, April 20, noon

Kim and Basney present a program of Mendelssohn and Schumann. The duo will perform on early-19th-century instruments including a fortepiano built in Maine by Rodney Regier.

Colby College Collegium Musicum, Jesse Wakeman, director
Saturday, April 22, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The Colby Collegium Musicum performs Antonio Vivialdi’s masterful Gloria. This brilliant and complex work for choir and orchestra, with soprano and mezzo-soprano soloists, is sure to invigorate the soul and ring in the spring.

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Jinwook Park, director
Colby College Chorale and Kennebec Choral Society, Jesse Wakeman, director
Saturday, April 29, and Sunday, April 30, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

In the closing concerts of the season, CSO will combine forces with the Colby College Chorale and Kennebec Choral Society to present Mozart’s Requiem. Also featured will be a performance by the winner of the Music Department’s annual concerto competition.

Fall 2017

Saturday, Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The 2017-18 Music at Colby series opens with the virtuoso Regina Carter, “widely considered the finest jazz violinist of her generation” according to the New York Times. Carter—a 2006 MacArthur Fellow—will be joined by members of her quintet for a tribute to the music of Ella Fitzgerald. This is the first of two concerts this year made possible by a generous anonymous donation

Saturday, Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Vox One, the award-winning acappella jazz quintet, makes its Colby debut with its unique blend of blues, folk, and gospel music. Composed of faculty members at the Berklee College of Music, they have toured throughout the U.S. and in Japan and opened for Ray Charles, Chicago, The Persuasions, The Bobs, The Woody Herman Orchestra, and the Count Basie Orchestra.

Origins, annual humanities theme event
Colby Symphony Orchestra
Jinwook Park, director
Saturday, Oct. 28, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

In its first concert of the season, the orchestra presents works by three German masters: Wagner’s The Overture and the dramatic Pilgrim’s Chorus from Tannhäuser; Brahms’s Variations on a Theme by Joseph Haydn; and Beethoven’s timeless Sixth Symphony, The Pastoral, which abounds with sounds and images of the German countryside.

 

Origins, annual humanities theme event
Colby Wind Ensemble
Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Maurice Ravel’s Boléro has been featured in numerous films, where it suggests evolution from a primal point of origin. Excerpts from a few of these films will be shown with accompaniment by the ensemble. The program also explores the evolution of the jazz trumpet with Allen Vizzutti’s stunning American Jazz Suite with guest soloist Mark Tipton. We’ll also visit the world of comics with Jess Langston Turner’s Black Bolt, Julie Giroux’s Before The Sun, and David Mairs’s A Touch of the Union Jack.

 

Colby Jazz Band
Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, Nov. 11, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

This program follows jazz treks and pathways beginning with George Shutack’s Dixieland-influenced ‘A Good Night in New Orleans,’ through the train travel-inspired ‘shuffle’ of Erik Morales’s “Out of the Doghouse,” to Kris Berg’s alto sax ballad ‘Lifelong Friends,’ all the way to Stevie Wonder’s ‘Tell Me Something Good’ and the Marcus Miller/Miles Davis electronic jazz hit ‘Tutu.’ We’ll also visit the Latin style Guaguancó with Michael Mossman’s “Paz Profundo” and Latin funk with Bobby Rodriguez’s ‘Jazz It Up.’

 

Thursday, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Page Commons Room, Cotter Union

Hadith Bani-Adam, a Somali refugee living in Lewiston, Maine, is one of a few younger Somalis playing the oud in the traditional style and singing older poetic songs of his native land. He is also a prolific composer, whose songs deal with the heartache of war and the resulting fallout. Greg Boardman, viola, and Ness Smith-Savedoff, hand percussion, will bring their eclectic backgrounds of traditional and progressive music to the mix.

 

Origins, annual humanities theme event
Colby College Collegium
Colby College Chorale with the Colby Kennebec Choral Society
Eric Christopher Perry, director
Saturday, Nov. 18, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Invitation explores the origins of American musical styles and their influence on traditional compositional forms throughout history. Highlighting Carol Barnett’s The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass, in collaboration with the Bluegrass Music Association of Maine, other works include the complete Old American Songs by Aaron Copland, canons, catches, and rounds by Kirke Mechem, and selections from The Harmony of Maine (1792) by Supply Belcher, the ‘Handel of Maine.’

 

Colby Symphony Orchestra
Jinwook Park, director
Eric Thomas, clarinet soloist
Saturday, Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition brilliantly portrays the characters and moods inspired by 10 paintings by Victor Hartmann featured in an 1874 exhibition at the Imperial Academy of Arts in Saint Petersburg. The program also features Schubert’s delightful Overture to Rosamunde and Weber’s virtuosic Clarinet Concerto .

 

Friday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 9, 3:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

A Colby tradition since 1971, the service includes readings, carol singing by candlelight, and the sounds of the Nickerson Carillon. Colby music ensembles provide a festive evening of traditional and contemporary seasonal music from around the world.

 

Spring 2016

Ameranouche
Saturday, Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

(Funded in part by the Hazel Hoyt Witherell Memorial Concert Fund)
The award-winning trio Ameranouche plays acoustic Gypsyinspired music mixing flamenco, bebop, and jazz swing. Whether playing a 1930 musette waltz or an Andalusianinspired original tune, Ameranouche’s Gypsy flamenco swing style is always fresh, virtuosic, and totally enjoyable.

Ensalada
Sunday, Feb. 14, 3 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

(Funded in part by the Ermanno Comparetti Concert Fund)
Though often associated only with jazz, a rich tradition of instrumental improvisation flourished in “classical music” throughout Europe from the late 15th century through the mid-18th century. Ensalada presents a rich and varied program of examples of these traditions of melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic improvisation.

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Janna Hymes,
guest conductor
Saturday, March 5, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

Three staples of uniquely Russian classical music are featured: from Mikhail Glinka, early-19th-century father of the Russian orchestral style, his rousing opera overture Ruslan and Lyudmila; from Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, late- 19th-century romantic and master melodist, his Symphony no. 2, The Little Russian; from Aram Khachaturian, Sovietendorsed, then condemned, then endorsed again, his Masquerade suite of five dances.


Video

Colby Wind Ensemble, Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, April 2, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

A composer’s inspiration can come from anything or anywhere: baseball (Carolyn Bremer’s “Early Light”), ribbons and word substitution (Joan Tower’s “Fascinating Ribbons”), the ferocity of nature (Percy Grainger’s “Hill Songs 1 and 2”), Genghis Khan (Julie Giroux’s “Khan”), devotional paintings (Vaclav Nelhybel’s “Trittico”). Five programmatic journeys promise a wide-ranging, magical ride.


Video

Saturday, April 9, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

(Funded in part by the Ermanno Comparetti Concert Fund)
The Maine Saxophone Project started at the University of Southern Maine in 2006 and hasn’t stopped growing. The combo has roots in a Charlie Parker tribute band formed by Med Flory and Buddy Clark in 1972, which featured harmonized arrangements of Parker’s music. M.S.P. has expanded beyond Parker’s compositions to perform arrangements that explore new styles and colors.

Colby Jazz Band, Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, April 16, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center

The Jazz Band’s final concert this season features idiomatic examples of various classic jazz styles. Gordon Goodwin’s “Race to the Bridge” has a harmonic scheme based on what jazz players call “rhythm changes.” Bob Minzer’s “Ouro Preto” is built on different Brazilian grooves, and “Swangalang,” his wonderful hybrid of jazz and blues styles, is referred to as a swinger. Michael Philip Mossman’s “Tanganova” draws on classic tango rhythms. Topping it off, the band adds a touch of R&B from Earth, Wind & Fire


Video – Stylin’!

Collegium Chamber Singers and Players,
Timothy Burris, director
Saturday, April 23, 2016 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

The Colby Collegium Chamber Singers and Players celebrate nature’s renewal with music of spring. Instrumental excerpts from “Le Journal du Printemps” by Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer, as well as songs and madrigals of spring by Francesca Caccini, Thomas Morley, Clément Janequin, and Claudio Monteverdi.

Colby College Chorale and Colby-Kennebec Choral
Society, Shannon Chase, conductor;
Colby Symphony Orchestra, Janna Hymes,
guest conductor
Saturday, April 30, and Sunday, May 1, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

In an annual spring tradition these three large ensembles once again join forces. This year they present Sunrise Mass by Norwegian composer Ola Gjeilo (b. 1978), an elegant and dramatic work for choir and string orchestra that boasts cinematic sweep and rich, emotional content. Continuing another Music at Colby tradition, the program will also include a performance by the winner of the Music Department’s annual student concerto competition.

End of semester recitals for the Flute, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Trumpet, Trombone, Voice, Violin, Viola, Mandolin, Drum, Organ, and Tabla studios.

End of semester concerts for Chamber Music in Piano, Violin, Cello, Flute, and Guitar and the Department Recital.

Concerts for the African Drumming, Jazz Improvization, and Composition JanPlans.


Video – Xi Yang Recital

Video – Flute Recital

Video – Music Recital

Video – Chamber Singers Recital

Video – African Drumming

Fall 2016

Revolutions, annual humanities theme event
Saturday, Sept. 17, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Since its debut in 2006 at Carnegie Hall, the Harlem String Quartet has established itself as one of America’s premier chamber ensembles. Its performances at prestigious classical venues throughout the world have earned critical acclaim. The quartet advances diversity in classical music by engaging new audiences with works by composers from underrepresented groups, and its Colby program does exactly that, with works by Celso Garrido-Lecca (Peru), Rafael Hernández (Puerto Rico), and Abelardo Valdés (Cuba), along with Beethoven’s Razumovsky Quartet.

Saturday, Oct. 8, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

(Funded in part by the Ermanno Comparetti Concert Fund) After 36 years teaching guitar in the Music Department, Carl Dimow will retire after this academic year. He performs his final official faculty concert with his eclectic klezmer band, the Casco Bay Tummlers. Several original Dimow compositions will be featured in addition to classic instrumentals and songs from the rich, soulful, and joyous klezmer repertoire.

Colby Symphony Orchestra
Jinwook Park, director
Saturday, Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Jinwook Park conducts his debut concert with the Colby Symphony Orchestra in a program of symphonic favorites, including the overture from Felix Mendelssohn’s magical Midsummer Night’s Dream, Gabriel Fauré’s luminous Pelléas et Mélisande Suite, and the New World Symphony by Antonin Dvorak.


Video – Introducing Jinwook Park

Colby College Chorale and Chamber Choir
Jesse Wakeman, director
Saturday, Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Making his debut at Colby, Jesse Wakeman will conduct the Colby Chorale and Chamber Choir in a performance of folk music. Enjoy a cultural tour of the continent with arrangements such as “Simple Gifts” by Jay Althouse, “Shenandoah” by James Erb, and “Ah, Si Mon Moine Voulait Danser!” by Jesse Wakeman.


Colby Wind Ensemble
Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, Nov. 5, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Exploring compositions that pay tribute to other art forms,  the Colby Wind Ensemble presents works celebrating Picasso, José Morea, and architect John Roebling. Included are “Pablo!” by Richard Meyer and Brooklyn Bridge for Clarinet and Symphonic Band by Michael Daugherty with soloist Kimberly Perkins Brewer. Also featured are “Not a March” by Liam Butchart ’19 and “Tramonto: Romanza for Cello and Winds” by Luis Serrano Alarcón with cello soloist Eric Kim ’17.


Video – Homage to the Soloist

Colby Jazz Band
Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center

A concert dedicated to all things inspired by the letter B. In most jazz charts, B denotes the bridge section, whose qualities usually include less memorable thematic material and less stable harmony—which can be the improviser’s great playground. Works include tunes whose titles or forms start with B: Blues Up and Down, Santa Baby, Bésame Mucho, Birks Works, Boogie Stop Shuffle, Boston Bernie, and Bad Guys.

Colby College Collegium Musicum
Jesse Wakeman, director
Saturday, Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Celebrated French composer Marc-Antoine Charpentier was a rival of Jean-Baptiste Lully, another prolific 17th-century composer, but Charpentier’s style evolved to represent a synthesis of the French and Italian schools. His late work Messe de Minuit pour Noël was composed during his final post as maître de musique of the Sainte-Chapelle, the glorious Gothic chapel in Paris. Collegium Musicum brings to life this delightful, dance-like Mass of French carols, performed as both vocal and instrumental movements as was customary in Charpentier’s time.

Colby Symphony Orchestra
Jinwook Park, director
Saturday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Led by Maestro Jinwook Park, the Colby Symphony Orchestra explores music from Russia and Norway. Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake Suite from the popular ballet of the same title and Rimsky Korsakov’s Overture on Russian Themes are featured. Edward Grieg’s tuneful Holberg Suite, a tribute to Norwegian writer Ludvig Holberg, rounds out the northern voyage.


Video – Northern Exposure

Friday, Dec. 9, 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 2:30 and 7 p.m
Lorimer Chapel

A Colby tradition since 1971, the service includes readings, carol singing by candlelight, and the sounds of the Nickerson Carillon. Colby music ensembles provide a festive evening of traditional and contemporary seasonal music from around the world.

End of semester recitals for the Flute, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Trumpet, Trombone, Voice, Violin, Viola, Mandolin, Drum, Organ, and Tabla studios.

End of semester concerts for Chamber Music in Piano, Violin, Cello, Flute, and Guitar and the Department Recital.

Concerts for the African Drumming, Jazz Improvization, and Composition JanPlans.


Video – Department Recital Dec 5th

Video – Department Recital Dec 6th

Spring 2015

Saturday, February 7, 2015, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The Bayside Trio will present an exciting and eclectic program of modern chamber works, including the premiere of Telos Regained for flute, cello, piano and computer-generated sounds by Colby’s own Associate Professor of Music Jonathan Hallstrom. Other works will include Paul Schoenfield’s klezmer-inspired Three Bagatelles and Chen Yi’s exquisitely delicate Night Thoughts.

Friday, February 20, 2015, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Musical Offering brings together Boston-area musicians who share a love of performing late-eighteenth century chamber music: from the last throes of the High Baroque through the wildly emotional gallant period leading up to Mozart.

Join Musical Offering and friends for a wonderful evening of entertainment.

Colby College Chamber Choir, Nicolás Alberto Dosman, director
with the Colby College String Quartet at Carnegie Hall

Monday, March 9, 2015, 8:00 p.m.
Carnegie Hall, Weill Recital Hall

The Colby College Chamber Choir and Colby String Quartet make their Weill Recital Hall debut in this concert of music by living composers and composers of the 20th century. The first half of the concert features compositions that address the complexities of the human experience, including life and death. The second half addresses experiences of the soul and the beyond.

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Stan Renard, conductor
with Yuri Lily Funahashi, piano

Saturday, March 14, 2015, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

7:00 PM Pre-Concert Talk with Dr. Steve Saunders

The Colby Symphony Orchestra will feature Professor Yuri Lily Funahashi performing Beethoven’s splendid Fourth Piano Concerto. The program will also include CSO’s very own French Horn section in a performance of Schumann’s Konzertstück for four horns and orchestra and the shimmering symphonic poem The Moldau by Bedrich Smetana.


Video – Piano Concerto No. 4, Op. 58 (Beethoven) 

Video – Vltava (The Moldau) (Smetana)

Colby Wind Ensemble, Eric Thomas, conductor

Saturday, April 4, 2015, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

“Every souldier shall diligently observe and learne the distinct and different sound of Drums, Fifes, and Trumpets, that he may know to answer and obey each of them in time of service.” The wind ensemble will present an historical march through music inspired by the military with an emphasis on music composed for military bands. The concert will include Massaino’s “Canzon Trigesimaquinta a 16,” Handel’s “Music for Royal Fireworks,” Mozart’s “Turkish March,” Prokofiev’s “Athletic Festival March,” and Rimsky Korsakov’s Concerto for Trombone and Military Band, featuring trombonist Katri Gurney ’15.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015,
William D. Adams Gallery, Museum Lobby

Tenor Nicolás Alberto Dosman, pianist Yuri Lily Funahashi, and guitarist Mark Leighton team up to perform music from Spain and Latin America, including Latin American popular music and folk songs. Manuel Portillo, visiting assistant professor of Spanish will introduce the performance.

Saturday, April 11, 2015, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

Laying off the usual trappings that make up a typical jazz group, George Schuller’s Circle Wide breathes new fire with a cool edge and plenty of daring to create modern jazz which at times leans towards the left of the musical spectrum yet, in many instances ‘swings-hard’ and skirts the fringes of post-modern bop.” Circle Wide features the front line talents of saxophonist Peter Apfelbaum and guitarist Brad Shepik, along with vibist Tom Beckham, bassist Dave Ambrosio, and drummer/leader George Schuller.

Colby Jazz Band, Eric Thomas, conductor

Saturday, April 18, 2015, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

Jazz musicians have a penchant for rewriting tunes, harmonies, enhancing textures and incorporating new rhythms. This concert is dedicated to these pursuits. Included will be jazz greats like “Giant Steps,” “2 1 3 Cha Cha,” “Asunción,” “Bluellespie,” “La dama y el vagabunda,” and “Cherokee”.

Colby Collegium Chamber Players and Singers, Todd Borgerding, conductor

Saturday, April 25, 2015, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Colby Chamber Singers explore the musical exchange between Europe and the Americas during the Age of Discovery. Renaissance choral works from the New World, instrumental music from 17th-century Europe based on Caribbean dances, and moving songs of exile from 16th-century Spain showcase the rich results of cultural encounters.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 6:00 p.m.
Museum of Art and Bixler

This celebration of the Arts at Colby will feature presentations of creative scholarship in both the Museum and the Bixler Art and Music Center. This event is the kick-off to a full day of academic presentations throughout the campus. Schedules and refreshments will be available in the Museum Lobby.

Thursday, April 30, 2015, 6:00 p.m.
Museum Lobby

The Museum’s Student Advisory Board invites the community to hear students in Music Theory II and Music Theory IV perform their original compositions inspired by works in the museum.

Colby College Chorale and Colby-Kennebec Choral Society, Nicolás Alberto Dosman, director
Colby Symphony Orchestra, Stan Renard, conductor

Saturday, May 2, 2015 and Sunday, May 3, 2015 7:30 PM, Lorimer Chapel

The Colby College Chorale and Colby-Kennebec Choral Society joined the Colby Symphony Orchestra to close Colby’s musical season with a glorious performance of Carmina Burana by Carl Orff. Carmina Burana is a scenic cantata composed by Orff in 1935 and 1936, based on 24 poems from the medieval collection Carmina Burana. The concert also featured the winner of Colby’s annual Student Concerto Competition, Jane Allen ’15, who played the first movement of Grieg’s Piano Concerto.


Video feat. Jane Allen

Video – Orff

End of semester recitals for the Flute, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Trumpet, Trombone, Voice, Violin, Viola, Mandolin, Drum, Organ, and Tabla studios.

End of semester concerts for Chamber Music in Piano, Violin, Cello, Flute, and Guitar and the Department Recital.

End of year solo recitals by senior students.

Concerts for the African Drumming, Jazz Improvization.


Video – Tiffany Lam – Solo Viola Sonata Op. 25 No. 1 (Hindemith)

Video – Jacqueline Betz – Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47 (Sibelius)

 

 

Fall 2015

James Nyoraku Schlefer, shakuhachi
Monday, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

(Funded in part by the Freda M. Charles Music Fund)
Originally the instrument of Zen monks, the Japanese transverse bamboo flute (shakuhachi) has captivated the minds and hearts of listeners for centuries. Remarkably simple in design, it takes years to master. The sound is sensual and capable of great emotional depth. Shakuhachi grand master James Nyoraku Schlefer is a virtuoso performer of traditional and contemporary shakuhachi music and a composer of new music for Japanese and Western instruments.

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Eric Thomas,
guest conductor
Saturday, Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

The first orchestra concert of the season, conducted by Eric Thomas, director of Colby’s Wind Ensemble and Jazz Band, includes Soren Nyhus’s “Bittersweet Victory” (2014), written for the Noteflight video game composition competition; Geraldine Green’s jovial (and slightly mischievous) Bass Clarinet Concerto (1992), performed by Emily Berry ’16; Marianne Martinez’s Sinfonia in C (1770); and Howard Hanson’s lush and expressive Symphony no. 2, the Romantic (1930).

Colby College Chorale and Chamber Singers,
Shannon Chase, director
Saturday, Oct. 31, 3:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

The Colby College Chorale and Chamber Singers perform a festive program of music evocative of the season and in celebration of Family Homecoming Weekend.

Michael Winther with Kimberly Grigsby
Saturday, Oct. 31, 9 p.m.

Page Commons, Cotter Union

(Funded by the Robert J. Strider Concert Fund, with additional funding from the Office of Alumni Relations and the Theater and Dance Department) A “first-rate singer of unusual refinement” with “a voice that traverses genres” (New York Times), Broadway singer/actor Michael Winther joins forces with Broadway musical director and pianist Kimberly Grigsby for an evening of well-known standards and some lesser-known, newer love songs by top emerging theater composers and lyricists. “Mr. Winther stakes out the most fertile artistic territory in American music: the high ground where show tunes, art songs and the singer-songwriter tradition merge.”(Stephen Holden, New York Times)

Colby Wind Ensemble, Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

Germaine Tailleferre (Overture for Orchestra) and Darius Milhaud (West Point Suite) were members of “Les Six”— French composers reacting to Wagner’s bombast and Debussy’s overt sensuality. Milhauds’ suite and William Grant Still’s “To You, America” were both commissioned for the West Point sesquicentennial. Still and Vincent Persichetti (Symphony for Band) both received Peabody Conservatory honorary doctorates in 1974. None has a connection with West Coast composer Julie Giroux (Culloden), but her composition, based on Scottish folk tunes, was too perfect to pass up.

Colby Jazz Band, Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m.

Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center

John Coltrane’s “Lady Bird” draws on Tadd Dameron’s composition by the same name and foreshadows the famous Coltrane changes. Freddie Hubbard’s cool hard bop chart “Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming” is a jazz rendition of the classic 16th-century hymn. Patty Darling’s “Idioteque” is a big-band arrangement of Radiohead’s hit. But Duke Ellington’s Such Sweet Thunder suite and Denis DiBlasio’s “Strong Like Bull!” are all their own.

Collegium Chamber Singers and Players,
Timothy Burris, director
Thursday, Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

The Colby Collegium Chamber Singers and Players explore music of 17th-century England. The late Renaissance and early Baroque in England produced a rich repertoire of both choral and instrumental works that celebrate the human in nature and the nature of being human. The program includes works by Henry Purcell, Matthew Locke, and John Wilbye.

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Janna Hymes,
guest conductor
Saturday, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

Janna Hymes is the music director of Maine Pro Musica and the Williamsburg (Va.) Sinfonia. A much sought-after conductor in the United States and abroad, maestra Hymes offers an eclectic program that includes the Shostakovitch Ballet Suite no. 1; Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto, featuring Colby Applied Music Associate Eric Thomas as soloist; and Beethoven’s Symphony no. 2 in D Major.

Friday, Dec. 11, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 12, 3:30 and 7 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

A Colby tradition since 1971, the service includes readings, carol singing by candlelight, and the sounds of the Nickerson Carillon. Colby music ensembles provide a festive evening of traditional and contemporary seasonal music from around the world.

End of semester recitals for the Flute, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Trumpet, Trombone, Voice, Violin, Viola, Mandolin, Drum, Organ, and Tabla studios.

End of semester concerts for Chamber Music in Piano, Violin, Cello, Flute, and Guitar and the Department Recital.

Concerts for the African Drumming, Jazz Improvization, and Composition JanPlans.


Video – Music Recital

Spring 2014

Saturday, February 22, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

One of the premier forces in the international world music scene, charismatic sarod player Aditya Verma has won the admiration of audiences across North America, Europe and India. His electrifying performances reveal his virtuosity, passionate energy and an intensely emotional approach to music. Come experience the sacred ragas that “seemed to put the audience in a trance”. –Sruti Magazine

Stan Renard, conductor
Saturday, March. 15, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

The Colby Symphony Orchestra presents Mendelssohn’s fifth symphony Reformation composed in 1830 in honor of the three-hundredth anniversary of the Presentation of the Augsburg Confession. Unfortunately, this marvelous work did not get showcased at the intended occasion and underwent many layers of censorship including from the composer himself. In this concert, the symphony will be performed in all its glory, along with three of Brahms’ enchanting Hungarian Dances and Aaron Copland’s hauntingly beautiful Quiet City.

Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, April 5, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

This concert features wonderful compositions written originally for band: Samuel Barber’s Commando March, Terry White’s Musica de Menearse, Paul Hindemith’s Symphony in B Flat and Roland Barrett’s Ancient Visions, as well as a new work by Luke Martin ’14. The instrumental choirs will perform Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 2 arranged for saxophone choir and Franz Gruber’s Stille Nacht arranged for clarinet ensemble.

Saturday, April 19, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

Featuring the not-to-be-missed performance of famed duo Lauren Sterling and Bro Adams, this program will explore many variations on “two”. Come enjoy magical duos in Darmon Meader’s arrangements of I Can’t Believe That You’re in Love With Me and I Could Write a Book and dueling instrumentalists in Gordon Goodwin’s Samba Del Gringo and Hunting Wabbits 2 and in Hank’s Symphony as recorded by the Jazz Messengers.

Saturday, April 26, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

JEPHTE
With the Historia di Jephte, Giacomo Carissimi offers a musical telling of the Old Testament story about Jephte, who, because of an unfortunate vow on the eve of battle with the Ammonites, is compelled to sacrifice his only daughter. One of the most important examples of the seventeenthcentury oratorio–a sacred genre closely related to opera–this music portrays the contrasting emotions of joy and sorrow with some of the most dramatic music from the period, including the celebrated lament of Jephte’s daughter.

Colby College Chorale and Colby-Kennebec Choral Society
Nicolás Alberto Dosman, director
Colby Symphony Orchestra, Stan Renard, conductor
Saturday, May 3, and Sunday, May 4, 7:30 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

Conducted by Nicolás Dosman, the Colby College Chorale and Colby-Kennebec Choral Society join the Colby Symphony Orchestra to close the season with one of Mozart’s most popular sacred works, the Coronation Mass. The orchestral portion of the program, led by conductor Stan Renard, will include Weber’s charming Invitation to the Dance and a work featuring the winner of the Colby Concerto Competition.


Video – Coronation Mass

Video – Zigeunerweisen

 

Fall 2014

Wednesday, September 17, 2014, Noon
William D. Adams Gallery, Museum Lobby

Music’s Quill (Timothy Neill Johnson, tenor, and Timothy Burris, lute will be joined by Todd Borgerding, viola for a program of English lute songs by John Dowland. Dowland is best known today for his melancholy songs such as “Come, heavy sleep” (the basis for Benjamin Britten’s Nocturnal) and “Flow my tears”, but, as this program demonstrates, he could also express lighter musical sentiments in song.


Video

Saturday, October 4, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Colby applied guitar faculty Carl Dimow is an eclectic and versatile musician. Equally at home on guitar and flute, he performs a wide variety of music including jazz, acoustic blues, klezmer and Brazilian folk music. This concert will draw on all of those genres, with music from Scrapper Blackwell, Naftule Brandwein, Yip Harburg, Antonio Carlos Jobim, and others. It will also feature some of Carl’s original compositions, including The Mensch. Carl will be joined by his long time friend and collaborator, Jim Lyden, on acoustic bass. Jim is noted for his beautiful sound, soulful improvisations, and wonderful ability to adapt to any style of music.

Stan Renard, violin, and Yuri Lily Funahashi, piano
Wednesday, October 8, 2014, Noon
William D. Adams Gallery, Museum Lobby

Violinist Stan Renard, founding member of the Bohemian Quartet and conductor of the Colby Symphony Orchestra will join forces with Professor Yuri Lily Funahashi on piano for a program inspired by Romani (Gypsy) Music. Come and experience a fun recital of virtuosic fiddling!

Saturday, October 18, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Inspired by the famous escola de samba parade associations of the Rio Carnaval, Samba New York! is the top samba performance company in NYC and one of the foremost such groups in the US. For this special program during Parent’s Weekend, Samba New York! brings its live samba show to the Colby campus, featuring percussionists and costumed dancers. The concert will also include a Brazilian dance lesson and demonstration, a short introductory lecture on samba and Carnaval in Rio, and a Q&A with the audience. Earlier in the day, the Colby community is invited to participate in a special samba percussion master class with Director, Philip Galinsky, Ph.D. and the Samba New York! drummers.

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Stan Renard, conductor
Saturday, October 25, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Messalonskee High School Auditorium

The Colby Symphony Orchestra, Stan Renard conductor, will feature a concert inspired by Fairy Tales. The Orchestra will open this performance with the Overture to Mozart’s Magic Flute, followed by the legend of the Night on the Bald Mountain by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky. The concert will conclude with Prokofiev’s beloved musical fairy tale, Peter and Wolf.


Video – How Music Can Tell a Story

Video – The Magic Flute Overture

Video – Peter & Wolf

Video – Night on Bald Mountain

Saturday, November 1, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Frederick Moyer will present one of his innovative “Notes and Footnotes” recitals. These recitals are eclectic and integrate works from both the classical and jazz worlds; often with an element of technology. 2014 is the 300th anniversary of CPE Bach’s birth and Moyer has indicated that the recital will explore the impact of CPE Bach’s idiosyncratic improvisatory embellishments on composers who followed him.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014, Noon
Museum, Lower Jetté Gallery

Music Associates Nicole Rabata, flute and Michael Albert, oboe will perform a concert of Baroque music featuring works by Bach, Telemann and Handel.

Colby Jazz Band, Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, November 8, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

Featuring jazz standards borrowed from musicals, operas, movies, and even cartoons. Summertime, My Favorite Things, My Funny Valentine, As Time Goes By, Body and Soul, All The Things You Are, I Got Rhythm and Some Day My Prince Will Come are a few of the standards we’ll explore.

Colby Wind Ensemble and Chorale at Waterville Opera House
Saturday, November 15, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Waterville Opera House

Colby Wind Ensemble and Chorale, Eric Thomas & Nic Dosman, conductors
The Colby Wind Ensemble and Chorale will join forces to perform a concert of works by American composers for winds and chorus including Jubilate Deo from tres cantus Laudendi by Mack Wilberg, In Remembrance by Jeffery Ames, Sleep by Eric Whitacre, and America the Beautiful by Samuel Ward.

Colby Collegium Chamber Singers and Players, Todd Borgerding, conductor
Thursday, November 20, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Colby Chamber Singers and Players join forces to present vocal and instrumental music by J.S. Bach, including two cantatas: Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland (BMV 61), and Actus Tragicus (BMV 106), whose uplifting music belies its gloomy name. Look for instrumental chamber music as well in an exciting program where the best of the High Baroque meets the best of Colby student performers.

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Stan Renard, conductor
Saturday, November 22, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
7 p.m. Pre-Concert Talk with Dr. Natasha Zelensky

The Colby Symphony Orchestra presents a performance focusing on musical migrations. The concert will open with the overture and entr’acte to Bizet’s Carmen, with its strong Spanish dance influences, followed by Alexander Borodin’s Polovtsian Dances No. 17, which were intended to evince the exoticism of the middle-east. Also included on the concert will be Antonin Dvorak’s well-known Czech Suite Op. 39.


 

Video – Czech Suite Op. 39

Video – Orchestral Suite No. 1 from Carmen

Video – Polovtsian Dance No. 17 from Prince Igor

Video – Marche Hongroise Rakoczy from The Damnation of Faust

Colby Chamber Choir, Nicolas Alberto Dosman, conductor
Thursday, December 4, 2014, 7:30 p.m.
William D. Adams Gallery, Museum Lobby

The Colby Chamber Choir will take the audience through a musical journey featuring compositions by American composers of the 20th and 21st century that address the complexities of the human experience. Included on the concert will be The Conversion of Saul by Z.Randall Stroope, Reincarnations by Samuel Barber, Prayer of the Children by Kurt Bestor, Carmina mei corids by Abbie Betinis and The Journey Home by Robert H. Young.

Friday, December 5, 2014, 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, December 6, 2014, 3:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.

Lorimer Chapel

Prelude at 7, Service at 7:30 p.m.This service includes readings, carol singing by candlelight, and the sounds of the Nickerson Carillon. Colby music ensemble will provide a festive evening of traditional and contemporary seasonal music from around the world.

End of semester recitals for the Flute, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Trumpet, Trombone, Voice, Violin, Viola, Mandolin, Drum, Organ, and Tabla studios.

End of semester concerts for Chamber Music in Piano, Violin, Cello, Flute, and Guitar and the Department Recital.

Concerts for the African Drumming, Jazz Improvization, and Composition JanPlans.


Video – Colby College Flute Quartet – Flute Quartet No. 1 in D Major, K.285 (Mozart)

Video – Colby College Flute Duo – Duos for Flutes (Muczynski)

Video – Carl Dimow – Jim Lyden Duo at Colby College

Spring 2013

James Schlefer, shakuhachi
Monday, March 4, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

(This concert 
is funded in 
part by the Freda M. Charles 
Music Fund)
For centuries the sounds of the Japanese bamboo flute (shakuhachi) have captivated minds and hearts. Though remarkably simple in design, the shakuhachi takes years—sometimes a lifetime—to master. Its sound is at once sensual and spiritual and capable of great emotional depth. James Nyoraku Schlefer is a virtuoso performer of traditional and contemporary shakuhachi music, an esteemed teacher in the Kinko School, and a composer of new music for both Japanese and Western instruments.

Jonathan Hallstrom, guest conductor
Saturday, March 16, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The orchestra’s bicentennial homage continues when former Colby Symphony Orchestra conductor Jonathan Hallstrom interrupts his sab-batical year to return as guest conductor. The concert features Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, written in 1813, the year of Colby’s founding. Also on the program are Gabriel Fauré’s Overture to Penelope, written in 1913, Colby’s centennial year; Stravinsky’s Ragtime for Eleven Instruments (1918); and Handel’s Eternal Source of Light Divine (1713), 
written exactly 100 years before Colby’s birth and featuring virtuoso trumpeter Mark Tipton and countertenor Michael Albert.

Colby Wind Ensemble, Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, April 6, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The ensemble picks up where it left off in the fall by adding works for mixed brass choir to a wide range of compositions for the already estab-lished roster of Colby flute, clarinet, saxophone, and trombone choirs. In addition to a Mozart octet for winds and a bit of comedy from PDQ Bach, the concert includes Senior Funk for flute choir, composed by Eric Thomas.

Colby Jazz Band, Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, April 13, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

With works from the four great arrangers featured in the fall concert, the band expands its exploration with tunes from composer/arrangers Toshiko Akiyoshi (Tuning Up), Ellen Rowe (The Doomsday Machine Meets Mr. Gelato), Jean Laughlin (Take A Risk), and Maine arrangers Darmon Meader of New York Voices and Terry White and Craig Skeffington of the Portland Jazz Orchestra. Jazz vocals pepper this perfor-mance, and the ghost of Fats Waller appears in the person of Emeritus Professor Paul Machlin, who will perform Your Feet’s Too Big. Emma Mayville ’13 presents big band vocals for Centerpiece and Straighten Up and Fly Right. The program concludes with a rendition of the Fats Waller and Una Mae Carlisle landmark version of I Can’t Give You Anything But Love.

Collegium Chamber 
Singers and Players, 
Todd Borgerding, director
Saturday, April 20, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Collegium enters the world of French Baroque musical theater with its presentation of Marc-Antoine Charpentier’s miniature opera Actéon. A cautionary tale for all those who hunt or go to the beach, Charpentier’s opera inventively interprets the myth of Actaeon, the mythological hunter who, caught gazing upon Artemis as she bathed, was changed into a stag and subsequently devoured by his own hounds. Grand choruses, mov-ing solos, and abundant instrumental music come together to make this an unforgettable experience.

Colby College Chorale and Colby-Kennebec Choral Society
Nicolás Alberto Dosman, director
Colby Symphony Orchestra, Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, May 4, and Sunday, May 5, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Nicolás Alberto Dosman leads the Colby College Chorale, Colby-Kennebec Choral Society, and the Colby Symphony Orchestra in a performance of Fauré’s spectacular Requiem. Far from the painful and frightening impact often associated with this genre, Fauré’s Requiem stands apart as an innovative expression of a happy deliverance and an aspiration towards celestial delight. Eric Thomas will lead the Colby Symphony in Schumann’s Manfred overture and a work featuring the winner of the Colby Concerto Competition.

 

Fall 2013

Censored Composers
Saturday, October 5, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The Hikari Piano Trio explores “Censorship Uncovered”, the annual theme of the Colby College Center for the Arts and Humanities. The trio, comprised of three seasoned chamber musicians (including faculty member, Yuri Funahashi), presents a program of works by Dmitri Shostakovich, Bright Sheng and Fanny Mendelssohn, composers who struggled to create music as they fought forces of censorship. With introductory remarks by Colby faculty Natasha Zelensky.

Saturday, October 26, 8:00 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Cited as one of the top oud players in the world by the San Francisco Chronicle, Iraqi-born, virtuoso oud player and composer Rahim Alhaj has been nominated twice for the Grammy Awards. In this program, he is joined by the venerable Portland String Quartet in performances of his original compositions, which combine traditional Arabic influences with contemporary styling.

Wednesday, November 13, 12:00p.m.
Colby Museum of Art (Lower Jetté Gallery)

Virtuoso fortepianist David Hyun-su Kim performs compositions by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven on a five-octave fortepiano, in a rare opportunity to hear these works on the instrument for which they were composed. The program will feature Beethoven’s beloved Moonlight Sonata, as well as modulating preludes extemporized by Mr. Kim. Presented with support from the Colby College Center for the Arts and Humanities.

Thursday, November 7, 7:30 p.m.
Page Commons

The Juanito Pascual New Flamenco Trio blends the talents and influences of three master musicians, creating a unique and spellbinding experience. Led by virtuoso flamenco guitarist and composer Juanito Pascual, they deliver traditional flamenco and music drawing on influences as diverse as Miles Davis and Jimi Hendrix to the Beatles and J.S. Bach. The trio and their guest dancer capture the passion and intensity of flamenco through propulsive rhythms, intricate compositions, and daring improvisations.

Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, November 9, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

Continuing the theme of “Censorship Uncovered”, the Colby Jazz Band offers a special opportunity to hear works that were censored, altered, or otherwise previously undelivered. The program includes Django from the Modern Jazz Quartet, an arrangement of Sun Goddess from Earth Wind and Fire, Duke Ellington’s Peanut Brittle Brigade, Sugar Rum Cherry, and movements of his Nutcracker Suite. Also on the program will be the premiere performance of a Latin-inspired original composition by Luke Martin ‘14.

Stan Renard, conductor
Saturday, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Newly appointed conductor Stan Renard makes his debut with the Colby Symphony Orchestra with a rich program that includes Borodin’s mysterious In the Steppes of Central Asia, Rossini’s lively L’italiana in Algeri Overture, and Ravel’s colorful Pavane pour une infante défunte. The concert concludes with Beethoven’s exciting first Symphony in C Major.

Thursday, November 21, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Circa 1600
Collegium Chamber Singers and Players explore music from Italy created during the first decades of the seventeenth century, a time when new expressive techniques revolutionized the musical world, and a new genre, opera, was heard for the first time. Look for music grand and intimate, for various combinations of voices and instruments, by Claudio Monteverdi, Giovanni Valentini, Alessandro Grandi, and the Gabrielis.

Saturday, November 23, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The Colby Wind Ensemble uncovers more censorship with a program of music by composers whose work have been banned including: Shostakovich’s Festive Overture, Hanns Eisler’s Auferstanden aus Ruinen, Aram Khachaturian’s Armenian Dances, and Richard Wagner’s Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral. Another portion of the program will feature the clarinet and saxophone ensembles, with Asymmetric Miniatures from the Doumka Clarinet Ensemble and a work by prolific, contemporary composer and virtuoso saxophonist Barbara Thompson.

Fall 2012

Trond Saeverud
Wednesday, Sept. 12, noon
Colby Museum of Art (Lower Jetté Gallery)

Violinist Trond Saeverud, who has appeared as soloist with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, makes his Colby debut in the season’s opening concert. Professor Yuri Funahashi joins him on piano for a program that brings together exciting 20th-century works of Ernst Bloch and Toru Takemitsu with audience favorites by Bach, Mozart, and Fritz Kreisler.

SColby Faculty Jazz Ensemble
Saturday, Sept. 22, 7:30 p.m.
Waterville Opera House

The Colby Faculty Jazz Ensemble and guest artists Jesse Feinberg (piano) and Wells Gordon (double bass) collaborate on a tribute to Herbie Hancock. Hancock has had a major influence on the evolution of jazz. In his album The New Standard, Hancock adopted the technique of crafting “new standards” by retooling the music of artists from Nirvana to Sade. The ensemble interprets Hancock’s hits from the Maiden Voyage and Head Hunters albums with a few compositional twists from composer-performers Carl Dimow, Mark Tipton, and Eric Thomas.

Karen Oberlin, jazz-pop singer; Jon Weber, piano
Saturday, Oct. 6, 9 p.m.
Page Commons, Cotter Union

(This concert is funded in part by the Hazel Hoyt Witherell Memorial Concert Fund)
A New York State of Mind returns as award-winning New York-based vocal artist Karen Oberlin performs songs from Cole Porter, Rodgers and Hart, George Gershwin, and other jazz, pop, and Broadway greats. Called “one of the saviors of the Great American Songbook” by the New York Times, and “thrilling” by critic Rex Reed, Oberlin headlines at such iconic New York venues as the Oak Room of the Algonquin Hotel and Jazz at Lincoln Center. Top New York musical director and NPR host Jon Weber accompanies.

Gjergji Gaqi ’07, piano; Dori Smith ’08, soprano
Saturday, Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Two outstanding music majors return for a joint recital during the Colby’s bicentennial year. Gjergji Gaqi ’07, fresh from completing his doctoral degree in piano performance at the University of Michigan, and Dori Smith ’08, a doctoral candidate in voice at the University of Arizona, present a richly varied program of piano and vocal music from the 19th and 20th centuries. Featured works include Fantasies, op. 116, by Brahms; Schubert’s Impromptu, op. 142, no. 2; Desperate Measures by American composer Robert Muczynski; and vocal music from Liszt, Mozart, Lori Laitman, and Ernest Chausson.

Janna Hymes, guest conductor
Saturday, Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The Colby Symphony Orchestra celebrates Colby’s bicenntennial year with a roster of four guest conductors. Janna Hymes, music director of the Williamsburg (Va.) Symphony and Maine Pro Musica begins the celebration with a program that includes Rossini’s sparkling overture to The Barber of Seville, and Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante, featuring principal players Michael Albert, Eric Thomas, Angela Capps, and Loren Fields. The concert concludes with Bizet’s youthfully exuberant Symphony in C.

Colby Wind Ensemble , Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, Nov. 3, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

This concert explores the depth and breadth of small instrumental ensembles and their unique repertoire. The program includes a trombone choir rendition of Freddie Mercury’s Bohemian Rhapsody, Eric Whitacre’s Sleep, Tico Tico arranged for clarinet choir, a saxophone choir arrangement of Villa-Lobos’s Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5, and music from Bach to the Beatles performed by a flute choir.

Colby Jazz Band , Eric Thomas, director
Saturday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium

Four of our favorite arrangers Duke it out, so Rich you can Count on this one to be totally Phat. That’s right, works by arrangers Billy Strayhorn and Sammy Nestico (Count Basie’s arranger) share the stage with arrangements by Gordon Goodwin of Big Phat Band fame and Latin composer/arranger Luis Felipe Basto. Featured works include Strayhorn’s Lush Life and Take the A Train, Nestico’s takes on Count Basie’s A Cool Breeze and Strike up the Band, Gordon Goodwin’s Jazz Police and High Maintenance, Basto’s Ebano, and Blues For Alice Swing.

Collegium Chamber Singers and Players, Todd Borgerding, director,
with special guests Eric Thomas and Timothy Burris
Saturday, Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

Collegium Chamber Singers and Players present the musical world of John Dowland, one of England’s greatest songwriters and lutenists, whose works explore the emotional gamut, from melancholy to madcap, from woe to cheerful wit. In recent years Dowland’s songs have attracted the attention of contemporary pop musicians, including Sting. Hear this take on Dowland’s music, as the musicians interpret the essence of the English Renaissance with voices, lutes, recorders—and a surprise!

Colby Symphony Orchestra, Eric Thomas, conductor
Saturday, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

The second symphony concert of Colby’s bicentennial year, conducted by Eric Thomas, features works written during the inaugural years of vari-ous Colby presidents. In 1892, the year Charles Ives wrote his Variations on America, Beniah Longley Whitman became Colby’s 11th president. Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man, written in 1942, had its debut the year Julius Seelye Bixler was appointed Colby’s 16th presi-dent. Bixler, an amateur cellist, was responsible for establishing the Colby Community Symphony Orchestra. The music for Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film Psycho was composed by Bernard Hermann in 1960, the year Robert E.L. Strider became president. An endowed fund established in Strider’s name supports one of the concerts on the Music at Colby series each year. Also included, Francesco Geminiani’s La Folia and works by Eric Thomas and Mark Tipton.

Friday, Dec. 7, prelude 7 p.m., services 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, preludes 3:30 and 7 p.m., 
services 4 and 7 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel

This Colby tradition continues to thrive. The service includes Advent, Christmas, and Epiphany readings, carol singing by candlelight, and the sounds of the Nickerson Carillon. Holiday selections by the Colby College Chorale under the direction of its new conductor, Nicolás Alberto Dosman, and additional performances by student-led ensembles provide a festive evening of traditional and contemporary sea-sonal music. A musical prelude begins one half hour before the processional and includes the Colby Handbell Choir.