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Colby will celebrate Black History Month with a series of films, a panel discussion on civil rights and several lectures, all focused on the theme “Provocations, Protests and Progress: Re-Viewing the Civil Rights Movement Fifty Years Since ‘Brown v. Board of Education.'” All of the following events are open to the public and free of charge.

Thursday, February 5, at 4 p.m. the panel “Protests and Progress: An Essential Primer on the Civil Rights Movement and Its Aftermath” will be held. Colby faculty members Rob Weisbrot (history), Margaret McFadden (American studies), Joseph Atkins (psychology) and Alec Campbell (sociology) will discuss the causes and consequences of the civil rights movement. It will be held in Room 100 of Lovejoy Building.

Monday, February 9, at 7:30 p.m. the film Blazing Saddles will be shown as part of “Provocations,” Colby’s Black History Month Film Festival. It will be shown in Room 215 of Lovejoy Building.

Monday, February 16, at 7:30 p.m. the film Ragtime will be shown as part of “Provocations,” Colby’s Black History Month Film Festival. It will be shown in Room 215 of Lovejoy Building.

Wednesday, February 18, at 4 p.m. Barbara Ransby, professor of history at the University of Illinois, Chicago, will present “Ella Baker and Grass Roots Leadership in the Black Freedom Movement.” Ransby is the author of Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement, a critically acclaimed biography of Baker, one of the organizational architects of the civil rights movement. The event will be held in Room 100 of Lovejoy Building.

Monday, February 23, at 7:30 p.m. the film A Soldier’s Story will be shown as part of “Provocations,” Colby’s Black History Month Film Festival. It will be shown in Room 215 of Lovejoy Building.

Wednesday, February 25, at 4 p.m. Johnny Williams, associate professor of sociology at Trinity College and author of African American Religion and the Civil Rights Movement in Arkansas, will present “Politicized Religious Beliefs in Civil Rights Movement Mobilization.” It will be held in Room 100 of Lovejoy Building.

Wednesday, March 3, at 4 p.m. television and documentary producer Callie Crossley will present the lecture “Real Heroism, Reel History: A Conversation about the Eyes on the Prize Documentary Series.” Crossley was an Academy Award nominee and Emmy Award winner for the documentary feature “Bridge to Freedom,” Eyes on the Prize. She also has been a producer for ABC’s news program 20/20. The lecture will be held in Room 100 of Lovejoy Building.

Black History Month grew out of “Negro History Week,” begun in 1926 by historian Carter G. Woodson and tied to the birthday of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. February is also the birth month of African-American historian and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois.