Contact:

Office of Communications (pr@colby.edu)
207-859-4350

Colby College is pleased to announce its November events. All are free (except where noted) and open to the public.

Thursday, November 2, 7 p.m.
Maine Gubernatorial Debate
Page Commons, Cotter Union
Incumbent Democrat Governor John Baldacci will face challengers State Senator Chandler Woodcock (R), Green Party Candidate Pat LaMarche and Independent Barbara Merrill. David Offer, executive editor of the Morning Sentinel and Kennebec Journal, will moderate.
Contact: Alice Elliott, 859-5313, aelliott@colby.edu

Thursday, November 2, 7 p.m.
The Russian Economy: From Plan to Market with Vladimir Sherov-Ignatiev
Room 100, Lovejoy Building
Vladimir Sherov-Ignatiev, a professor in the Department of World Economy and Economics at St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia, will present an insider’s assessment of Russia’s transition from government central planning to private market stimulus and response.
Contact: Dianne Labreck, 859-5230, dlabreck@colby.edu

Saturday, November 4, 7:30 p.m.
Music at Colby Series

Colby Jazz Band: Neo-Bop and Beyond
Lorimer Chapel
Featuring the music of George Russell, Miles Davis, Bill Evans, and Wayne Shorter, among others, the ensemble will explore compositions including “Cubano Be, Cubano Bop,” “So What,” “Freddie Freeloader,” “Blue In Green,” “All Blues,” “Impressions,” and more. Pieces written immediately before and after the modal explosion will also be performed. The music in this concert promises to be smooth, melodic, and varied. Eric Thomas, director.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tuesday, November 7, 7 p.m.
Sustainable Solutions: Entrepreneurship and Environmental Challenges

An Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Paul Hudnut, director of venture development at Colorado State University, will discuss how entrepreneurship can be a positive force for making significant, scaleable and sustainable environmental impacts. He will also discuss examples of social entrepreneurs and his experience as a founder of Envirofit International, which was recently recognized by the Stanford Social Innovation Review as one of the top ten most innovative companies at creating social change.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-4846, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Wednesday, November 8, 7 p.m.
Is It Okay If I Don’t Get Caught? with J.C. Watts
Gerrish Lecture
Page Commons, Cotter Union
J.C. Watts is a former Congressman and chair of the House Republican Conference, an ordained minister from Oklahoma and the author of President Bush’s 2001 faith-based initiative. He will speak about character. “Character is doing the right thing when nobody’s looking,” he says. “There are too many people who think that the only thing that’s right is to get by, and the only thing that’s wrong is to get caught.”
Contact: Rev. Ronald E. Morrell, 859-4273, remorrel@colby.edu

Thursday, November 9 and Friday, November 10
Energy Past, Energy Present, Energy Futures:

Fossil Fuels and Nuclear Power in Local and National Mix

A Goldfarb Center Conference
Smith/Robins Room, Roberts Building
Colby faculty and invited guests will explore how energy policies are developed, how groups work together to ensure adequate supply, affordability, and efficiency, and the outlook for oil and nuclear power, among other topics.
Keynote Address: Thursday, November 9, 7 p.m.
Energy Policy: How to Recognize What Policy You’ve Got with New York Times Reporter Matthew Wald
Contacts:  Professor Paul Josephson, 859-5326, prjoseph@colby.edu, or Professor Lenny Reich, lsreich@colby.edu

Thursday, November 9, 7 p.m.
The Economic Impact of Immigration with George J. Borjas
Room 100, Lovejoy Building
George J. Borjas, a professor of economics and social policy at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, focuses his research on the impact of government regulations on labor markets, with an emphasis on the economic impact of immigration. He is the author of Wage Policy in the Federal Bureaucracy; Friends or Strangers: The Impact of Immigrants on the U.S. Economy; Heaven’s Door: Immigration Policy and the American Economy; and the textbook Labor Economics.
Contact: Dianne Labreck, 859-5230, dlabreck@colby.edu

Friday, November 10, 4 p.m.
Fall Faculty Exhibition Opening Reception
Lobby, Colby College Museum of Art
Bringing together the work of Colby College art faculty members, the exhibition presents recent work by Bonnie Bishop, Frank Hobbs, Margaret Libby, Harriett Matthews, Abbott Meader, Nancy Meader, Garry Mitchell, Dee Peppe, and Scott Reed.
Contact: Colby College Museum of Art, 207-859-5600, museum@colby.edu

Saturday, November 11, 7:30 p.m.
Music at Colby Series

Colby Wind Ensemble: Something Old
Lorimer Chapel
The Wind Ensemble explores one of the musts for a traditional wedding — “something old” — beginning with Suite of Old American Dances by Robert Russell Bennett. The suite includes “Cakewalk,” a dance form invented by slaves as a parody of plantation owners; “Schottische,” a German variant of a Bohemian dance that begat the polka; “Western One-Step,” based on “Texas Tommy,” the first swing dance; “Wallflower Waltz;” and “Rag.” The program continues with Memories of an Old Zarzuela, a work by Carlos Surinach based on the opera El Barberillo de Lavapiés, a zarzuela by 19th-century Spanish composer Asenjo Barbieri. Finally, Vincent Persichetti’s Symphony for Band, will showcase the percussion section. Eric Thomas, director.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu
    
Tuesday, November 14, 4 p.m.
Visiting Writers Series

Playwright Edward Albee
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center
Perhaps best known for his Tony-award winning play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Albee has won three Pulitzer Prizes — for Delicate Balance (1966), Seascape (1975), and Three Tall Women (1994). He has received two Tony Awards and a special Tony for lifetime achievement. He was a Kennedy Center honoree and was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1996.
Contact: Ruth Jacobs, 859-4353, pr@colby.edu

Wednesday, November 15, 7:30 p.m.
Pilgrimage and Crusade in Western Tuscany

Clara M. Southworth Lecture
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center
Contact: Vicki Hendsbee, 859-5631, vlhendsb@colby.edu

Thursday, November 16, 4:30 p.m., opening reception, 6 p.m.
Artist Talk

Currents3: Lihua Lei
Room 154, Bixler Art and Music Building
Lihua Lei’s work explores the sense of bounty and loss inherent to our bodily condition. Working in the gap between the figurative and the abstract, Lei uses diverse materials to allude to the body: a pool of carnelian colored thread suggests blood; a tube of cloth winds through the landscape like an esophagus or a birthing canal; a tree’s knotty irregularities imply scars, burns, or tumors upon a torso. For currents3, Lei explores memory as a bodily phenomenon, exemplified by the phantom limb. How does our body remember, or feel, what it has lost? Lei’s installation invites the viewer to reflect upon the vulnerabilities and transformations of the body.
Contact: Colby College Museum of Art, 207-859-5600, museum@colby.edu

Thursday, November 16, 7 p.m.
Environmental Human Rights: Mining and Miners and the Experience of the Philippines and Indonesia
Room 215, Lovejoy Building
Suzanne Moon, a professor in science, technology, and society at Harvey Mudd College, will investigate the politics of technological scale and the ways in which these politics have become interwoven with at times conflicting definitions of human rights.
Contact: Kate O’Halloran, 859-5319, kohallor@colby.edu

Thursday-Saturday, November 16-18, 7:30 p.m.
Colby Dance Theater

Balance and Timing: An Evening of Dance and Theater
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
In a break from the routine, Colby Dance Theater makes good on its moniker by interweaving four David Ives plays from All in the Timing through the evening’s concert. With a focus on the creative properties and challenges of minimalism, the company explores the adage that “less is more” through movement and word.
Tickets: $2 with Colby I.D. and for seniors; $3 general admission. Box office is open Monday through Saturday during the week of the performance from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Contact: Deborah Ward, 872-3388, djward@colby.edu

Saturday, November 18, 7:30 p.m.
Music at Colby Series

Colby Chamber Players
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Building
The second season of Colby Chamber Players promises another exciting, eclectic mix of chamber works. Pianist Cheryl Tschanz, flutist Lee Humphreys, violinist Graybert Beacham and clarinetist Eric Thomas offer a concert featuring “Sonata for Viola and Piano” by Rebecca Clarke, composed in 1919 for that year’s Coolidge competition; Ellen Zwillich’s “Divertimento” (1983) for flute, clarinet, violin, and ‘cello; and Jonathan Hallstrom will conduct William Walton’s “Façade” (1922) for chamber ensemble and two narrators.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tuesday, November 28, 7 p.m.
The Health of Maine Rivers with Bill MacDonald, executive director of Maine Rivers
An Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-4846, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Wednesday, November 29, 7 p.m.
Shifting Political Discourse in Times of War

A Goldfarb Center Debate
Room 1, Olin Science Center
History Professor Jason Opal, Jeffrey Selinger of Cornell University, Ralph Kettell ’07 and Chris
Appel ’07 will debate the appropriate level of dissent about the war in Iraq. By what parameters should we judge and draw the line between legitimate dissent and potentially harmful protest?
Contact: Kate O’Halloran, 859-5319, kohallor@colby.edu
___________

Ongoing Exhibitions at the Colby College Museum of Art

November 12 – December 31
Fall Faculty Exhibition
Bringing together the work of Colby College art faculty members, the exhibition presents an opportunity to view recent work by Bonnie Bishop, Frank Hobbs, Margaret Libby, Harriett Matthews, Abbott Meader, Nancy Meader, Garry Mitchell, Dee Peppe, Scott Reed, and Barbara Sullivan.

November 16 – February 4, 2007
Currents3: Lihua Lei
Lihua Lei’s work explores the sense of bounty and loss inherent in our bodily condition. Working in the gap between the figurative and the abstract, Lei uses diverse materials to allude to the body: a pool of carnelian colored threads suggests blood; a tube of cloth winds through the landscape like an esophagus or a birthing canal; a tree’s knotty irregularities imply scars, burns, or tumors upon a torso. For Currents3, Lei explores memory as a bodily phenomenon, exemplified by the phantom limb. How does our body remember, or feel, what it has lost? Lei’s installation invites the viewer to reflect upon the vulnerabilities and transformations of the body.

June 25, 2006 – February 25, 2007
Whistler as Printmaker
While James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903) achieved fame as a painter, he was also a serious and innovative printmaker, producing some 450 etchings and about 180 lithographs. His imagery and the technical means that he developed for etching and for printing plates influenced not only his fellow printmakers in Europe and America but also many others who followed. This selection of prints is drawn from a collection on loan to the Colby museum consisting of almost 200 impressions representing the highest quality and range of Whistler’s printmaking. Curated by David P. Becker

The Colby College Museum of Art is open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. It is closed on Mondays. Admission is free and the museum is accessible to people with disabilities. For more information call 207-859-5600 or visit http://www.colby.edu/museum/.