Contact:

Office of Communications (pr@colby.edu)
207-859-4350

Colby College is pleased to announce the following February events. All are open to the public and free (except where noted).

Focus the Nation
Wednesday, February 6
Colby College Campus
Colby is one of more than 1,600 institutions gearing up for a national day designated to create awareness about global warming and work toward positive change. Colby students participating in Focus the Nation have organized film screenings, talks, a nature walk, an electric car demonstration and more.
Contact: Tucker Gorman ’10, twgorman@colby.edu

Colby College Museum of Art Open House and Reception

Art Openings for Adolph Gottlieb and Gary Green Exhibits
Thursday, February 7, 4 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The Colby College Museum of art invites the community to come for a visit, celebrate the openings of two shows — Adolph Gottlieb: Paintings and Early Prints and Gary Green: The History of Nature (Part 1), and share in some refreshments.
Contact: Colby College Museum of Art, 859-5600, museum@colby.edu

The One That Gets Slapped
February 8-9, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
February 10, 2008, 2 p.m.
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
The circus has come to town. Leonid Andreyev’s The One That Gets Slapped, a classic of Russian Modernism, tells of a beautiful circus performer consumed by the men who “adore” her. It is a tragedy of sexual politics, exploitation, and desire — set amidst the comic theatricality of circus clowns and acrobats, staged in the tradition of the early Russian avant-garde — a theater of poetry, spectacle, and physical dynamism. Directed by Kathryn Syssoyeva. (Tickets: $2 for seniors, $3 general admission. Mature teens and adults.)
Contact: Deborah Ward, 207-859-4521, djward@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, February 9, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

French Language Guided Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Saturday, February 9, 10:30 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Veronique Plesch, associate professor of art history and chair of the art department, will lead a tour — in French. Refreshments will be served at 10 a.m.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, February 10, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Know Before You Vote: The Environment
Tuesday, February 12, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Philip Nyhus and Gail Carlson, professors of environmental studies, will discuss where the candidates stand on major issues concerning the environment.
Contact: Marnie Terhune, 859-5319, mterhune@colby.edu

Noontime Art Talk: Director’s Tour of currents4
Thursday, February 14, noon
Colby College Museum of Art
Carolyn Muzzy Director and Chief Curator Sharon Corwin will discuss Amy Stacey Curtis’s installations. Free bag lunches are available to the first 40 people.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, February 16, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Music of Renewal: Britten and Mozart

Colby College Chorale
Saturday, February 16, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
The two principal works on this program offer musical responses to artistic crisis and reinvigoration. Benjamin Britten composed Rejoice in the Lamb during his journey to England from America in 1943 as he struggled to reconcile his pacifism with WWII’s devastation. Mozart, anxious to restart his career independent of the patronage, composed Solemn Confessor Vespers just before he left his position as Kapellmeister to a demanding, conservative archbishop. Soprano Dori Smith, a Colby senior, will sing the solo “Laudate.” Conducted by Paul Machlin.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, February 17, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Know Before You Vote: The Economy
Tuesday, February 19, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Colby Professor of Economics Michael Donihue will discuss the economic issues facing the presidential candidates and give voters the basics on the economic policy platforms of the political parties and the presidential candidates.
Contact: Marnie Terhune, mterhune@colby.edu, 859-5319

Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium

Rethinking the Way We Address Complex Risks to Human Health and Ecosystems
Tuesday, February 19, 7 p.m.
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Over the past half century, industrial activities and consumption have damaged ecosystems and human health. Yet scientists, advocates, and policymakers have largely reacted to immediate threats without a clear vision of solutions or goals. This has contributed to perceptions that the environmental and health movements are thoughtlessly oppositional and impede development. Joel Tickner ’89, who teaches at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, will discuss the opportunity to build bridges among scientists, researchers, health professionals, policymakers, businesses, advocates and communities to chart a solutions-oriented path towards sustainability.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-5356, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Noontime Art Talk: Gary Green
Thursday, February 21, noon
Colby College Museum of Art
Gary Green, assistant professor of art, will discuss his exhibition, The History of Nature (Part 1). Free bag lunches are available to the first 40 people.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, February 23, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Music at Colby: The Strider Concert

Portland String Quartet and Cheryl Tschanz, piano
Saturday February 23, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
The Portland String Quartet and pianist Cheryl Tschanz bring together three revolutionary composers in this program. In many ways, the ingenious and distinctive formal, harmonic, metric and timbral musical languages of Mahler, Brahms and Ravel set the stage for the new freedoms and complexities of 20th-century music. Indeed, the power of their musical vision continues to shock and amaze eight years into the 21st century.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, February 24, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Poetry Reading: Rachel Simon ’99
Monday, February 25, 7 p.m.
Robinson Room, Miller Library
Rachel Simon ’99 will read from her first book of poems, Theory of Orange, which won the 2005-2006 Transcontinental Prize from Pavement Saw Press. Simon writes openhearted, hip, funny poems about contemporary life. Simon teaches writing and gender studies at SUNY Purchase, Sarah Lawrence College, and Bedford Hills Women’s Prison.
Contact: Professor Peter Harris, 859-5270, pbharris@colby.edu

Delivering Healthcare in the Developing World
Monday, February 25, 7 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Dr. William Bicknell has worked in more than 46 countries, in most parts of the world, and is currently involved with the government of Lesotho in designing and implementing programs to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS. He is chairman emeritus and professor of international health at Boston University School of Public Health; founder of the Center for International Health; and former associate vice president for International Health at Boston University.
Contact: Marnie Terhune, 859-5319, mterhune@colby.edu

Photography Lecture
Tuesday, February 26, 4:30 p.m.
Room 154, Bixler Art and Music Center
Chris Killip’s photographs are represented in many significant collections including the Museum of Modern Art, the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Killip has published four books including 55, (Phaidon Press, 2001), part of an ongoing series of pocket-sized monographs of historical and contemporary photography. He teaches photography at Harvard.
Contact: Vicki Hendsbee, 859-5631, vlhendsb@colby.edu

Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium

Conserving Warblers and Willet
Tuesday, February 26, 7 p.m.
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Peter McKinley ’87, director of forestland conservation for the Forest Society of Maine,
uses examples from his work to demonstrate the roles of science, education, and policy in conservation. If general conservation principles represent top-down conservation, then site-specific studies that educate people in a particular region represent the bottom-up approach. McKinley will discuss conservation science research conducted on songbird and shorebird populations, as well as means of delivering this research to make a difference on the ground and water.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-5356, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Know Before You Vote: Foreign Policy
Tuesday, February 26, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Ken Rodman, Colby’s William R. Cotter Distinguished Teaching Professor of Government, is nationally known for his expertise in U.S. foreign policy and economic sanctions. He will discuss where the candidates stand on issues related to foreign policy.
Contact: Marnie Terhune, 859-5319, mterhune@colby.edu

For up-to-date events listings, visit http://www.colby.edu.
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Ongoing Exhibitions at the Colby College Museum of Art



Adolph Gottlieb: Paintings and Early Prints
February 3-April 13
Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) was an early member of the Abstract Expressionist movement and a productive painter, printmaker, and sculptor. Primarily self-taught as a painter and printmaker, Gottlieb aimed to synthesize an intellectual approach to painting with his own emotional experience. This exhibition brings together 50 early prints and paintings that demonstrate Gottlieb’s significant contribution to the changing face of American art at mid-century. Organized by the Colby College Museum of Art and the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, Inc.

Gary Green: The History of Nature (Part I)
February 7-March 23
Gary Green joins the Colby College Art Department this year as professor of photography. Green’s sensitive images of the common landscape draw connections between human nature and the natural world. His photographs of carved and weathered tree bark, like human skin, tell stories of manmade encounters and natural phenomena. Decaying houses, cleared lots, and bulldozed dirt piles reveal the forces and events that create the history of nature.

Joan Whitney Payson Collection
February 17-June 1
The Colby College Museum of Art presents seven world-class works of art from the Joan Whitney Payson Collection on biennial loan from the Portland Museum of Art. This impressive collection includes paintings by Marc Chagall, Gustave Courbet, Edgar Degas, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Alfred Sisley.


Whistler at Work: The Process of Printmaking
Through June 15
Peter and Paula Lunder have assembled one of the foremost collections of prints by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), comprising more than 200 etchings and lithographs of the highest quality. The latest in a continuing series of exhibitions drawn from this collection not only serves as an overview of Whistler’s printmaking career but also highlights a number of rare examples that reveal Whistler’s working process. Important selections include examples of Whistler’s trial proofs, three pairs of prints that show how the artist developed his images through successive printings from the same plate, and a rare pastel that illuminates how Whistler treated similar subjects in different media. Curated by David P. Becker

currents4: Amy Stacey Curtis
Through April 13
The fourth exhibition in the museum’s annual emerging artist series, currents, presents work by Maine-based installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis. Curtis, who has been working in abandoned industrial sites throughout the state for the past seven years, creates interactive works that examine our interconnectedness through themes of chaos, order, and repetition.


The Colby College Museum of Art is open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free and the museum is accessible to people with disabilities. For more information call 859-5600 or visit http://www.colby.edu/museum/.