Contact:

Office of Communications (pr@colby.edu)
207-859-4350

Colby College is pleased to announce the following March events.  All are open to the public and free (except where noted).

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, March 1, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Colby Jazz Quartet with Mark Tipton
Saturday, March 1, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium, Bixler Building
Eric Thomas (reeds), Carl Dimow (guitar), Rick Bishop (bass), and Mark Macksoud (drums) are joined by virtuoso trumpet player Mark Tipton in a concert of original compositions and classic jazz repertoire that ranges in style from pre-samba to Dixieland, blues, funk, country-western and postmodern jazz.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, March 2, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Know Before You Vote: Education
Tuesday, March 4, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Professor Mark Tappan discusses the education policy issues in the upcoming election as they relate to the parties and individual candidates.
Contact: Marnie Terhune, 859-5319, mterhune@colby.edu

Noontime Art Talk: Thursday in the Park with William (Merritt Chase)
Thursday, March 6, 2008, noon
Colby College Museum of Art
Curatorial Assistant Hannah Blunt will discuss her research, which brings to an end a longstanding controversy over William Merritt Chase’s painting. She will reveal which park is depicted.
Contact: Colby College Museum of Art, 859-5600, museum@colby.edu

Lipman Lecture

Jonathan Sarna: The Future of the American Jew: American Judaism in the 21st Century
Thursday, March 6, 7 p.m.
Pugh Center, Cotter Union
Jonathan Sarna is the author of American Judaism, which is acclaimed as the best volume ever written on the subject. Dubbed one of America’s 50 most influential American Jews, he was chief historian for the 350th commemoration of the American Jewish community and is recognized as a leading commentator on American Jewish history, religion and life. He teaches American Jewish history at Brandeis University and is director of its Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program.
Contact: Professor Joseph Roisman, 859-4163, jsroisma@colby.edu

Tings Dey Happen
Friday, March 7, 7:30 p.m.
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
One-man-show writer and performer Dan Hoyle presents his work about the crisis of oil in Nigerian politics. Having spent a year studying oil politics in Nigeria, he brings to the stage his unique form of journalistic theater exploring one of the most important geopolitical stories of our time. Nigeria supplies 10 percent of America’s oil. Militants in the oil-producing Niger Delta are blowing up pipelines, warlords are threatening rebellion and oil company employees are being kidnapped with alarming frequency. Hoyle presents all the characters in this ambitious, comic and disturbing new play.
Contact: Deborah Ward, 859-4520, djward@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, March 8, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

An Evening of North Indian Music
Saturday, March 8, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
Aditya Verma, the Colby Music Department’s first artist-in-residence, is fast emerging as a force on the world music stage. A charismatic young sarod player based in Canada and India, Verma has won the admiration of audiences across North America, Europe, and India. His electrifying performances reveal his virtuosity, passionate energy, and an intensely emotional approach to the music. A disciple of the legendary sitar player Pandit Ravi Shankar and renowned sarod master Ustad Aashish Khan, Verma will offer a concert of traditional North Indian music.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, March 9, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

The Impact of the War in Iraq at Home with John McChesney
Monday, March 10, 7 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Senior Correspondent John McChesney has been with National Public Radio since 1979. He has served as national editor (responsible for domestic news) and senior foreign editor. McChesney covered a variety of beats for NPR and traveled extensively throughout Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia.
Contact: Marnie Terhune, 859-5319, mterhune@colby.edu

IBM Lecture

Our Changing Atmosphere: The Ozone Hole and Carbon Dioxide
Tuesday, March 11, 7 p.m.
Room 105, Keyes Building
Nobel Laureate F. Sherwood Rowland will discuss the chemistry of atmospheric changes and the predicted effect on climate. Rowland teaches in the departments of chemistry and earth system science at the University of California, Irvine, and won the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry.
Contact: Professor Dasan Thamattoor, 859-5765, dmthamat@colby.edu

The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World
Wednesday, March 12, 7:30 p.m.
Room 105, Keyes Building
Journalist, human rights activist and author Kati Marton will speak on the subject of her book, The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World. Of those Marton chronicled, one made landmark films like Casablanca, another developed the atomic bomb and the hydrogen bomb, and one pioneered new genres of photography, including wartime photojournalism. Born in Hungary, Marton served as bureau chief and foreign correspondent for ABC News and has received numerous honors for reporting on human rights around the world.
Contact: Professor Robert Weisbrot, rsweisbr@colby.edu

Rhythm Science
Wednesday, March 12, 7:30 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Paul D. Miller, author of the award-winning book Rhythm Science, will discuss issues that modern artists face: intellectual property, owning ideas, and above all, how art navigates the complex culture of digital media. Miller (AKA DJ Spooky) will demonstrate the complex relationship between text and art in a multimedia context.
Contact: Professor Chandra Bhimull, 859-4707, cbhimull@colby.edu

Protecting Livelihoods and Landscapes in Northern Maine
Thursday, March 13, and Friday, March 14  
Colby College
Changes in land ownership, the forest products industry, and conservation and public access in Maine’s unorganized territories have marked recent decades. More than 90 percent of the state’s 17.7 million acres of forestland are in private ownership, mostly in the northern part of the state. State regulatory and zoning authority over the unorganized territories has led to contentious disputes among owners, gateway communities, the state government and conservation groups. This conference encourages discussion about the long-term future of northern Maine by convening diverse representatives of major private and public interests. For full details visit: http://www.colby.edu/environ/LandscapeConf/Landscapes.html
Contact: Alice Elliott, 859-5313, aelliott@colby.edu

Protecting Large Working Landscapes: Models and Cautionary Tales
Thursday, March 13, 7 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Sally Fairfax, a professor of forest policy at the University of California, Berkelely, focuses on conservation of resources that are jointly owned and/or managed by public and private entities. This keynote address at the Protecting Livelihoods and Landscapes in Northern Maine conference will consider public and private models that may apply to livelihood and landscape protection in northern Maine.
Contact: Alice Elliott, 859-5313, aelliott@colby.edu

Noontime Art Talk: The Joan Whitney Payson Collection
Thursday, March 13, 12 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Mirken Curator of Education Lauren Lessing will discuss the seven world-class works of art on biennial loan from the Portland Museum of Art. The collection includes paintings by Marc Chagall, Gustave Courbet, Edgar Degas, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Alfred Sisley. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

57th Annual Colby College Leadership Institute

Climate Change: Taking the Lead Locally to Reduce Warming Globally
Friday, March 14, 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Colby College
This year’s program focuses on ways individuals, local government, and local organizations and businesses can work together with national and international leaders to generate innovative, practical and sustainable solutions for climate change while saving — and even making — money. Nobel Laureate chemist Sherwood Rowland will deliver the keynote address (at 9 a.m.), drawing on his teaching, research, and leadership in the field since the 1970s. An information and networking session and the Governor’s Awards Luncheon will follow. Cost is $50 per person and includes lunch. For full details visit: http://www.colby.edu/spec.prog/other/leadership/index.shtml
Contact: Alice Elliott, 859-5313, aelliott@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, March 15, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Eggs-ploring Art
Saturday, March 15, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art and Freshwater Arts, Waterville
Eggs-ploring Art will begin with a scavenger hunt in the Colby College Museum of Art followed by an egg-decorating workshop at Freshwater Arts. This event is free and open to all ages, but attendance is limited and pre-registration is required. To register, call 680-2055.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Clifford the Big Red Dog
Saturday, March 15, 1-3 p.m.
Colby Bookstore, Roberts Building
Storytelling, cookie decorating and other fun activities will accompany an opportunity to meet Clifford, the Big Red Dog — the star of the enduring children’s book series and PBS television show. The event is free and open to the public, but tickets are required. Call 859-5400 for free tickets, or stop by the Colby bookstore to pick them up.
Contact: Barbara Shutt, 859-5415, bcshutt@colby.edu

The Colby Sinfonietta
Saturday, March 15, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
Now in its fourth year, the Colby Sinfonietta continues its tradition of performing works for smaller orchestra. This year’s performance will feature an eclectic mix of works that span more than 200 years: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s delightful Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in G Major (K. 216) with Colby Orchestra Concertmaster Graybert Beacham as violin soloist; Charles Ives’s A Set of Pieces for chamber orchestra; and Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho’s Lichtbogen for chamber ensemble and live electronics.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, March 16, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Artist Talk: Nina Katchadourian
Monday, March 17, 4:30 p.m.
Room 154, Bixler Building
Artist Nina Katchadourian works in a wide variety of media, including photography, sculpture, video, and sound. The subject of a 10-year retrospective at the Tang Museum in 2006, her work explores translations, organizational systems, and forms of communication, both human and animal. Katchadourian’s 2003 photo essay, The Nightgown Pictures, from the Lunder Collection, is currently on view in the museum.
Contact: Vicki Hendsbee, 859-5631, vlhendsb@colby.edu

Talkin’ About Fair Trade
Monday, March 17, 7 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Jonathan Rosenthal of Oke Fair Trade will discuss the ethics of fair trade practices with a focus on the banana trade, which has a long history of exploitation of workers, manipulation of governments and environmental destruction. Oké bananas come directly from farmers who are paid a fair price, which means higher wages, safer working conditions, and a cleaner environment. Rosenthal has worked for two decades to create a sustainable food system and more just relationships between farmers and consumers and all those in between. Rosenthal is a board member of Ecologic Finance and co-founder and former executive director of Equal Exchange, the pioneering fair trade coffee company.
Contact: Marnie Terhune, 859-5319, mterhune@colby.edu

Hollis Lecture

Fanning the Flames: Some Next Steps for the World’s Climate Movement
Tuesday, March 18, 7 p.m.
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Jonathan Isham, professor of economics and environmental studies at Middlebury College, is co-editing a new book, Ignition: The Birth of the Climate Movement.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-5356, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Visiting Writers Reading: Michael Paterniti
Tuesday, March 18, 7 p.m.
Robinson Room, Miller Library
Michael Paterniti won the 1998 National Magazine Award for his article “Driving Mr. Albert,” which was first published in Harper’s Magazine, and would later serve as the basis for Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein’s Brain. Paterniti is a former executive editor of Outside.  His work has appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, Details, and Esquire. He lives in Portland, Maine, with his wife and son.
Contact: Professor Peter Harris, 859-530, pbharris@colby.edu

The War on Drugs: A War on the Poor
Wednesday, March 19, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Richard Van Wickler, superintendent of the department of corrections in Cheshire City, N.H., member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, and Maria Clemencia Ramirez, a professor of anthropology with a focus on Latin American studies, will discuss consequences of the “war on drugs.”
Contact: Marnie Terhune, 859-5319, mterhune@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, March 22, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, March 23, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Student Docent Gallery Lecture: Madonna and Child from the Cuzco School
Wednesday, March 26, 4:30 pm
Nicolyna Enriquez ’11 will discuss Madonna and Child, a sculpture by an unknown artist thought to be affiliated with the 17th- and 18th-century Cuzco School in Peru.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Story Time in the Museum
Saturday, March 29, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Student volunteers and museum docents will read art-related stories, play games, and lead discussions in the museum’s galleries. The program, offered every Saturday morning, is designed for young children, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Tour of the Colby College Museum of Art
Sunday, March 30, 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The museum now offers free, guided tours every Sunday.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Harmony by Decree: Citizen Activism in China
Monday, March 31, 7 p.m.
Room 215, Lovejoy Building
Nick Young, founding editor of the China Development Brief, will draw on 12 years’ of reporting on the emerging NGO community in China and serving as an advisor and trainer to many Chinese organizations. He will discuss the development of the sector and the state’s responses to it. How sustainable is the Communist Party’s current management approach?
Contact: Professor Hong Zhang, 859-4117, hzhang@colby.edu

For up-to-date events listings, visit www.colby.edu.

Ongoing exhibitions at the Colby College Museum of Art



Adolph Gottlieb: Paintings and Early Prints
February 3-April 13
Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) was an early member of the Abstract Expressionist movement and a productive painter, printmaker, and sculptor. Primarily self-taught as a painter and printmaker, Gottlieb aimed to synthesize an intellectual approach to painting with his own emotional experience. This exhibition brings together 50 early prints and paintings that demonstrate Gottlieb’s significant contribution to the changing face of American art at mid-century. Organized by the Colby College Museum of Art and the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, Inc.

Gary Green: The History of Nature (Part I)
February 7-March 23
Gary Green joins the Colby College Art Department this year as professor of photography. Green’s sensitive images of the common landscape draw connections between human nature and the natural world. His photographs of carved and weathered tree bark, like human skin, tell stories of manmade encounters and natural phenomena. Decaying houses, cleared lots, and bulldozed dirt piles reveal the forces and events that create the history of nature.

Joan Whitney Payson Collection
February 17-June 1
The Colby College Museum of Art presents seven world-class works of art from the Joan Whitney Payson Collection on biennial loan from the Portland Museum of Art. This impressive collection includes paintings by Marc Chagall, Gustave Courbet, Edgar Degas, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and Alfred Sisley.

Tradition, Transition, and Modernity
March 25-April 8
These photographs, taken by five Colby students during a trip to China, illustrate the reconfiguration of urban, public spaces there. This was part of a trip led by Associate Professor of East Asian Studies Hong Zhang.


Whistler at Work: The Process of Printmaking
Through June 15
Peter and Paula Lunder have assembled one of the foremost collections of prints by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), comprising more than 200 etchings and lithographs of the highest quality. The latest in a continuing series of exhibitions drawn from this collection not only serves as an overview of Whistler’s printmaking career but also highlights a number of rare examples that reveal Whistler’s working process. Important selections include examples of Whistler’s trial proofs, three pairs of prints that show how the artist developed his images through successive printings from the same plate, and a rare pastel that illuminates how Whistler treated similar subjects in different media. Curated by David P. Becker

currents4: Amy Stacey Curtis
Through April 13
The fourth exhibition in the museum’s annual emerging artist series, currents, presents work by Maine-based installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis. Curtis, who has been working in abandoned industrial sites throughout the state for the past seven years, creates interactive works that examine our interconnectedness through themes of chaos, order, and repetition.

The Colby College Museum of Art is open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free and the museum is accessible to people with disabilities. For more information call 859-5600 or visit http://www.colby.edu/museum/.