Contact:

Office of Communications (pr@colby.edu)
207-859-4350

Colby College is pleased to offer the following October events. All are open to the public and free (except where noted).

Boots on the Ground: Lessons from Renewable Energy Development in Southeast Asia, from Concept to Contract
Tuesday, Sept. 30, 7 p.m.
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Gijsbert Nollen, principal consultant for International Consultancy Europe (ICE BV), focuses on project management and development. He has led projects in Sri Lanka for seven years and is inspired by the wide range of interests and opinions that drive him to advance sustainable development causes.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-5356, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Liturgical Music of the 16th and 17th Centuries
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 1 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Colby faculty members Michael Albert (voice and violin) and Todd Borgerding (organ) present instrumental and vocal works from the Renaissance and Early Baroque periods. Included on the program are organ toccatas, violin sonatas, and sacred cantatas representative of the rich tradition of music that ornamented sacred ritual in the cathedrals and monasteries of Europe. For a complete list of events associated with the Realms of Faith exhibition, visit www.colby.edu/museum.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Immigration and Islam in Contemporary France
Thursday, Oct. 2, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Professor Dominic Thomas, chair of the department of French and Francophone Studies and Italian at the University of California Los Angeles, specializes on immigration in contemporary France, African politics and culture, and globalization. He is the author of Nation-Building, Propaganda and Literature in Francophone Africa and Black France: Colonialism, Immigration, and Transnationalism.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

Mike Daisey: If You See Something Say Something
Friday, Oct. 3, 7:30 p.m.
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
The New York Times describes Mike Daisey ’96 as “one of the finest solo performers of his generation.” He has been a guest on The Late Show with David Letterman and his work has been heard on the BBC, NPR, and The National Lampoon Radio Hour. Through the untold story of the father of the neutron bomb and a personal pilgrimage to the Trinity blast site, Maine’s own bad boy of the theater exposes the secret history of the Department of Homeland Security, asking what price Americans are willing to pay for safety. (Mature teens and adults) www.mikedaisey.com
Contact: Deborah Ward, 859-4521, djward@colby.edu

Cake in Concert
Friday, Oct. 3, 8:30 p.m.
Wadsworth Gymnasium, Alfond Athletic Center
Tickets to see this a alternative-rock band from California are available online via www.colby.edu/spb or www.ticketweb.com. Tickets are $15 for non-Colby college students (with ID) and $20 for the general public.
Contact: Jessica Dash, 859-4280, jadash@colby.edu

Embodying the Romantic Spirit: Music of the Schumanns and Brahms
Saturday, Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
The award-winning musicians of Triple Helix (Bayla Keyes, violin; Rhonda Rider, cello; Lois Shapiro, piano) are known as one of the finest piano trios on today’s musical landscape. In this performance, the trio will use intimate letters, diary entries, and music to bring listeners into the fascinating, richly imaginative milieu of the post-Enlightenment world.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Somali Bantu Opening Reception and Dance Performance
Sunday, Oct. 5, 2 p.m.
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Building
This exhibition of photographs taken by Jorge Acero and Colby students explores the stories of the Somali Bantu people, members of an ethnic minority who were forced to flee the civil war in Somalia and who have resettled in Lewiston, Maine.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Maroon and Gold and Green: Moving One of the Nation’s Largest Universities Toward Sustainability
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7 p.m.
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Jonathan Fink ’73 was named the first director of the Global Institute of Sustainability (GIOS) and chief sustainability officer at Arizona State University in 2007. He arrived at ASU in 1979 from Stanford where he began as a postdoctoral researcher and moved through the academic ranks to become department chair. He was a director of the geochemistry program at the National Science Foundation before taking over ASU’s research office in 1997.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-5356, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Know Before You Vote: Supreme Court Vacancies
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7 p.m.
Room 141, Diamond Building
In this first of four Know Before You Vote lectures leading up to Election Day, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Government and Director of the Goldfarb Center L. Sandy Maisel will talk about what this election could mean for the Supreme Court and other federal judgeships.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

Realms of Faith: Medieval Art
Hugging the Saint: Art and Ritual on the Pilgrimage to Santiag
o
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Kathleen Ashley, professor of English, University of Southern Maine. For details and a complete list of events associated with the Realms of Faith exhibition, visit www.colby.edu/museum.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Currents5 Artist Talk: t s Beall
Thursday, Oct. 9, 4:30 p.m., Room 1, Olin Science Center
Opening reception, 6 p.m., Museum lobby
The fifth installment of currents, the museum’s annual solo exhibition dedicated to the work of an emerging artist with connections to Maine, presents a new video installation by t s Beall, an American artist living in Glasgow. The exhibition consists of a single tower surmounted by a rotating platform outfitted with video projectors.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Rooms with a View
Saturday, Oct. 11, 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art and Freshwater Arts, Waterville
This interactive family workshop will begin with a tour of the museum galleries, focusing on artists’ arrangements and depictions of three-dimensional space, followed by a diorama-making workshop at Freshwater Arts. The event, offered in conjunction with Freshwater Arts and Waterville Main Street, is free and open to all ages, but space is limited and preregistration is required. To register call 680-2055.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Noontime Art Talk
The Somali Bantu Experience: From East Africa to Maine

Thursday, Oct. 16, 12:30 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Professor of Anthropology Catherine Besteman will speak about this exhibition of photographs taken by Jorge Acero and Colby students. It explores the stories of the Somali Bantu people, members of an ethnic minority who were forced to flee the civil war in Somalia and who have resettled in Lewiston, Maine. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Second Congressional District Debate
Thursday, Oct. 16, 7 p.m.
Page Commons, Cotter Union
Incumbent Congressman Mike Michaud (D) will debate major issues with Republican challenger John Frary.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

You Can Argue with the Facts: A Political History of Climate Change
Friday, Oct. 17, 4:30 p.m. (reception at 4 p.m.)
Room 100, Lovejoy Building
Scientists believe in facts. But if people have deep reasons to resist, they can and will argue with the facts, often quite effectively.  With climate science there has been considerable, long-standing resistance to the conclusions of climate scientists that global warming is upon us. Professor of History and Science Studies at the University of California, San Diego, and the Provost of Sixth College Naomi Oreskes focuses her researches the historical development of scientific knowledge, methods, and practices in the earth and environmental sciences. Her work has been cited in The New Yorker, USA Today, and the film An Inconvenient Truth.
Contact: Professor James Fleming, 859-5881, jfleming@colby.edu

Slices of Life
Friday-Saturday, Oct. 17-18, 7:30 p.m.
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
This year the popular Slices of Life festival goes to Africa. Presenting short pieces by the continent’s premier playwrights, Colby’s student directors invite you to travel across the Atlantic without leaving your seat. As always, no passport is required. (Mature teens and adults)
Contact: Deborah Ward, 859-4521, djward@colby.edu

Iraq: From 20/20 Hindsight to Future Vision
Monday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Stuart Krusell ’85 will discuss what the war in Iraq means for democracy there and around the world. He teaches comparative government at Bentley College and recently returned to the U.S. after serving as a director for the International Republican Institute, first in the Palestinian Territories and then in Morocco.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

Know Before You Vote: Predicting Presidential Performance
Tuesday, Oct. 21, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
The Goldfarb Family Distinguished Professor of American Government Professor G. Calvin Mackenzie and Randi Arsenault ’09 will share their thoughts on the 2008 presidential candidates based on their research of past presidents.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

Clara M. Southworth Lecture
Liturgy, Legitimacy, Program: The Art Historian in the Virgin Chapel of Beauvais Cathedral

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 7:30 pm,
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Art historian Michael Cothren, professor of art history at Swarthmore College, will examine the three stained-glass windows installed during the 1240s in the Virgin Chapel of the Gothic Cathedral of Beauvais. These windows offer no obvious sense of formal unity. Cothren will propose the existence of a unifying theme that binds these windows, but questions whether he is performing a legitimizing ritual of modernist art history or whether he is opening a window into a 13th-century world that, increasingly like ours, conveyed ideas and told stories in pictures rather than words. For a complete list of events associated with the Realms of Faith exhibition, visit www.colby.edu/museum.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Gerrish Lecture: Sex and the Soul
Wednesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.
Page Commons, Cotter Union
Donna Freitas, assistant professor of religion at Boston University, will speak on the subject of her most recent book, Sex and the Soul, which is based on a national study about the influence of sexuality and romantic relationships on the spiritual identities of America’s college students. 
Contact: Ron Morrell, 859-4273, remorrel@colby.edu

Human Rights Activism in a Developing Country and Our Engagement in the Quest for Collective Justice
Wednesday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Asif Saleh is the executive director of Drishtipat, a nonprofit, nonpartisan volunteer organization committed to safeguarding human rights in Bangladesh through action-oriented projects that provide direct assistance to those individuals whose voices remain unheard.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

Noontime Art Talk
The Sacred in Contemporary Art

Thursday, Oct. 23, 12:30 p.m.
This talk, in association with the exhibition Realms of Faith: Medieval Art from the Walters Art Museum, features Professor of Art Véronique Plesch. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people. For details and a complete list of events associated with Realms of Faith, please visit http://www.colby.edu/museum.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Voice of the Whale
Saturday, Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
George Crumb’s Vox Balaenae (Voice of the Whale) for amplified flute, cello, and prepared piano was inspired by the singing of the humpback whale and will be performed by the Bayside Trio: Nicole Rabata on flute, Ani Kalayjian on cello, and Anastasia Antonacos on piano. The eerie timbre of the opening flute cadenza, evocative cello harmonics, percussive piano techniques, and shimmering antique cymbals create vivid oceanic imagery that is both majestic and serene. Mezzo-soprano Solange Merdinian will join the trio with Ravel’s Chansons madecasses and Armenian composer Tigran Mansurian’s Three Madrigals.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Visiting Writers Series: Joan Wickersham
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 7 p.m.
Robinson Room, Miller Library
Joan Wickersham is the author of the novel The Paper Anniversary and the recently released memoir The Suicide Index: Putting My Father’s Death in Order. Her fiction has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories, she has published essays in Yankee and the Boston Globe, among others, and she has contributed and read on-air essays for National Public Radio’s On Point and Morning Edition.
Contact: Professor Debra Spark, 859-5284, daspark@colby.edu

Know Before You Vote: Foreign Policy
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Assistant Professor of Government Walter Hatch will speak about foreign policy in relation to the 2008 presidential election. Hatch is the author of Asia in Japan’s Embrace and teaches courses on international relations and politics in Asia.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

Noontime Art Talk
Interior Remodeling: The Catholic Imagination in Historical Perspective

Thursday, Oct. 30, 12:30
This talk, in association with the exhibition Realms of Faith: Medieval Art from the Walters Art Museum, features Professor of Religious Studies Debra Campbell. Free bag lunches to the first 40 people. For details and a complete list of events associated with Realms of Faith, please visit http://www.colby.edu/museum.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Know Before You Vote: International Economics
Thursday, Oct. 30, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Grossman Professor of Economics Patrice Franko will speak about international economics in relation to the 2008 presidential election.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu, 859-5319

Boylan Bassett Annual Halloween Reading
Friday, Oct. 31, 7 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
This annual reading features English professors Jennifer Finney Boylan and Charles Bassett.
Contact: Department of English, 859-5251

Ongoing Events

Story Time in the Museum
Saturdays at 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Join museum docents every Saturday morning for art-related stories, games, and discussion in the museum’s galleries. Story Time in the Museum is free and open to the public, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Guided Museum Tours
Sundays at 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Current Exhibitions at the Colby College Museum of Art

The Somali Bantu Experience: From East Africa to Maine
Oct. 2-Nov. 16, 2008
This exhibition of photographs taken by Jorge Acero and Colby students explores the stories of the Somali Bantu people, members of an ethnic minority who were forced to flee the civil war in Somalia, and who have resettled in Lewiston, Maine.

Currents5: t s Beall
Oct. 9, 2008-Feb. 1, 2009
The fifth installment of currents, the museum’s annual solo exhibition dedicated to the work of an emerging artist with connections to Maine, presents a new video installation by t s Beall, an American artist living in Glasgow. The exhibition consists of a single tower surmounted by a rotating platform outfitted with video projectors. Projecting from this structure onto the walls of the gallery are circular, scope-like video sequences of landscape imagery drawn from desolate outposts and contested borderline areas.

Whistler’s Waterscapes: River, Sea, and Canal Views from the Lunder Collection
June 19-Oct. 26, 2008
In its myriad forms, water has symbolized many things throughout history, from the endlessly flowing cycles of life to the hidden depths of the unconscious. This exhibition of prints (and one painting) by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), drawn from the Lunder Collection, highlights this restlessly innovative artist’s response to the theme of water. The works range across his career, from London’s Thames River and the English seacoast to the canals of Venice and Amsterdam. Curated by David P. Becker

Masterpieces of American Folk Art

June 29-Oct. 22, 2008
The statewide Maine Folk Art Trail exhibition provides an opportunity for the Colby College Museum of Art to present 50 objects from its extensive collection of 19th-century works from the American vernacular tradition. Colby’s exhibition comprises works in a variety of media and features important primitive portraits and landscapes from the American Heritage Collection, gift of Edith and Ellerton M. Jetté. For more information about the Maine Folk Art Trail visit www.mainefolkarttrail.com.

Realms of Faith: Medieval Art from the Walters Art Museum

Sept. 7, 2008-January 4, 2009
Drawn from one of the largest and finest medieval art collections in the United States, this exhibition of rare and beautiful objects dating from the sixth to the 15th century focuses on Christian liturgical practices and personal devotion during one of the most fascinating periods in world history. For a complete listing of associated events, please visit www.colby.edu/museum.

For up-to-date event information, please visit www.colby.edu.