Contact:

Office of Communications (pr@colby.edu)
207-859-4350

Colby College is pleased to offer the following November events. All are open to the public and free.

Bring ’em Back for More!
Saturday, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
The Colby Symphony Orchestra’s first concert of the season will feature recent Colby graduate Emily Parker ’08 performing the second movement of Max Bruch’s Violin Concerto. Also included will be Dvorak’s Serenade for Winds and Mozart’s Symphony No. 40. Conducted by Jonathan Hallstrom.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Liturgical Music from the Middle Ages and Renaissance
Wednesday, Nov. 5, 1 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
The Colby Collegium Musicum sings works designed for the liturgy by Leonin, Perotin, Machaut, Dunstaple, and Dufay. The program presents music based on chant, including improvisatory organum and polyphonic motets. Led by Todd Borgerding.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Journalist and Novelist Cristina Garcia
Wednesday, Nov. 5, 7 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Cuban-born American journalist and novelist Cristina Garcia worked for Time magazine before focusing on writing fiction. Her first novel, Dreaming in Cuban, received critical acclaim and was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has since published The Aguero Sisters, Monkey Hunting, and A Handbook to Luck and has edited books of Cuban and other Latin American literature.
Contact: Noel James, 859-4256, njames@colby.edu

Hiraki Sawa
Artist Talk: Thursday, Nov. 6, 4:30 p.m.
Room 154, Bixler Art and Music Center
Opening Reception: Thursday, Nov. 6, 6 p.m.
Using video animation, Hiraki Sawa combines actual footage with superimposed images to create imaginary, often miniaturized worlds. Airplanes fly through an otherwise mundane apartment. Figures of people and animals walk across kitchen sinks and bathtubs. Wrote the New Yorker, “A London-based Japanese artist adopts the English penchant, a la Beatrix Potter and Lewis Carroll, for making quiet domestic interiors come surrealistically alive.”
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

Real Life Dilemmas in Medical Ethics
Thursday, Nov. 6, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Frank Chessa has a Ph.D. in health care ethics and is currently Maine Medical Center’s first full-time clinical ethicist. His research interests include metaethics, environmental ethics and health care ethics, including informed consent, care at the end of life, HIV, genetic enhancement and the recruitment of women for clinical trials.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, 859-5319, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu

Defying Gravity: Tangos, Ungrounded Marches, and Movies
Saturday, Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
The Colby Wind Ensemble will celebrate the 90th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth with a performance of Four Dances from West Side Story and will feature the Argentinean-inspired dances of Vientos and Tangos by New England composer Michael Gandolfi and Hobbits from Johan de Meij’s first symphony, The Lord of the Rings. Directed by Eric Thomas.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Women in the Synagogue: A ‘Revolution’ Realized?
Monday, Nov. 10, 7 p.m.
Pugh Center, Cotter Union
This panel presentation and roundtable will feature Rabbi Carolyn Braun, Rabbi Susan Bulba Carvutto, and Cantor Deborah Marlowe.
Contact: Elisa Narin van Court, 859-5274, emnarinv@colby.edu

America’s Energy Future: Oil, Dependency, and the Alternatives
Monday, Nov. 10, 7 p.m.
Room 122, Diamond Building
Michael Klare, author of Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of America’s Growing Dependency on Imported Petroleum, will discuss the current energy situation and its consequences both abroad and domestically. The lecture will also focus on alternatives that America could use to achieve energy independence. Klare teaches peace and world security studies at Hampshire College.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, 859-5319, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu

Visiting Lovejoy Journalist Tom Edsall of the Huffington Post
Tuesday, Nov. 11, 7 p.m.
Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building
Tom Edsall is political editor of the Huffington Post, a prominent Internet newspaper of columns and blogs, and a professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He has written two books, Chain Reaction and Building Red America. The third of the Lovejoy visiting journalists, Edsall will discuss his experience in the field of journalism.
Contact: Susanna Thompson, 859-5319, Susanna.Thompson@colby.edu
 
Biodiversity: Buzzword or Fundamental Concept
Tuesday, Nov. 11, 7 p.m.
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Attempts to define biodiversity broadly can lead conservationists into misguided attempts to maximize biodiversity by increasing species richness. The goal of conservationists should be to maintain natural assemblages of species, or in cases where ecosystems have been degraded, to restore natural assemblages of species. Malcolm Hunter, a professor of conservation biology in the Department of Wildlife Ecology at the University of Maine, will discuss how can this be done efficiently.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 859-5356, Beth.Kopp@colby.edu

Currents5: Curator’s Tour
Thursday, Nov. 13, 12:30 p.m.
Elizabeth Finch, Lunder Curator of American Art, will discuss “Here Be Dragons” by t s Beall. Currents is a series of annual exhibitions by emerging artists who push the boundaries of traditional art forms.
Contact: Beth Finch, 859-5612, efinch@colby.edu

The House of Bernarda Alba
Nov. 13-15, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
Behind the thick walls of Bernarda’s house, a family of women bathes in a stew of frustrated passion. Bernarda’s husband is dead, and tradition decrees that her five daughters must stay sequestered in mourning for eight years. The only escape is a suitable match. One of them has the money to attract Pepe el Romano, and one of them has the youth and beauty to hold him. But beauty and wealth live in different parts of the house, tearing the sisters apart and threatening to destroy the only thing Bernarda values: her honor. Written by Federico García Lorca, translated by Caridad Svich, and directed by Laura Chakravarty Box. (Mature teens and adults.)
Contact: Deborah Ward, 859-4521, djward@colby.edu

Latin Voices: Bossa, Mambo, Cha Cha, Bembe, Samba, Bomba
Saturday, Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m.
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center
After getting back to basics with a visit to classic hits by the Count and the Duke (Basie and Ellington), the Colby Jazz Band will continue with Dizzy (Gillespie) and then explore some of the origins of Latin-influenced jazz with present-day composers Paquito D’Rivera, Arturo Sandoval, and others. We’ll include tunes both famous and soon-to-be famous and wrap up the program with one of the most famous songs of all, the theme from Sesame Street. Eric Thomas, director
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Jews at the Crossroads of Islamic and Christian Spain
Monday, Nov. 17, 7 p.m.
Pugh Center, Cotter Union
Professor Jonathan Decter is an associate professor in the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University.
Contact: Elisa Narin van Court, 859-5274, emnarinv@colby.edu

Ritual Music/Ritual Objects
Saturday, Nov. 22, 7:30 p.m.
Lorimer Chapel
In collaboration with the Colby College Museum of Art’s Realms of Faith exhibition, Collegium Musicum presents ritual music from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including sounds that served as sonic ornament for Christian rituals, from contemplative chant to devotional motets. The program will include an exploration of organum, the medieval tradition of chant-based composition and improvisation. Directed by Todd Borgerding.
Contact: Vivian Lemieux, 859-5670, vlemieux@colby.edu

Ongoing Events

Story Time in the Museum
Saturdays at 10 a.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Join museum docents every Saturday morning for art-related stories, games, and discussion in the museum’s galleries. Story Time in the Museum is free and open to the public, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Guided Museum Tours
Sundays at 2 p.m.
Colby College Museum of Art
Contact: Lauren Lessing, 859-5609, llessing@colby.edu

Current Exhibitions at the Colby College Museum of Art

Hiraki Sawa
Nov. 6, 2008-Jan. 25, 2009
This exhibition presents three videos by the London-based, Japanese-born artist Hiraki Sawa. At once playful and meditative, Sawa’s works show imaginary, often miniaturized worlds animated by such seemingly incongruous elements as airplanes aloft in an otherwise mundane apartment, running and walking figures who evoke the early photographic movement studies of Eadweard Muybridge, and the shadowy silhouettes of animals placidly but persistently on route to somewhere else.

The Somali Bantu Experience: From East Africa to Maine

Oct. 2-Nov. 16, 2008
This exhibition of photographs taken by Jorge Acero and Colby students explores the stories of members of the Somali Bantu ethnic minority who were forced to flee the civil war in Somalia, and who have resettled in Lewiston, Maine.

Currents5: t s Beall
Oct. 9, 2008-Feb. 1, 2009
The fifth installment of currents, the museum’s annual solo exhibition dedicated to the work of an emerging artist with connections to Maine, presents a new video installation by t s Beall, an American artist living in Glasgow. The exhibition consists of a single tower surmounted by a rotating platform outfitted with video projectors. Projecting from this structure onto the walls of the gallery are circular, scope-like video sequences of landscape imagery drawn from desolate outposts and contested borderline areas.

Realms of Faith: Medieval Art from the Walters Art Museum
Sept. 7, 2008-Jan. 4, 2009
Drawn from one of the largest and finest medieval art collections in the United States, this exhibition of rare and beautiful objects dating from the sixth to the 15th century focuses on Christian liturgical practices and personal devotion during one of the most fascinating periods in world history. For a complete listing of associated events, please visit www.colby.edu/museum.

For up-to-date event information, please visit www.colby.edu.