Angelini and Simmons ’17J Publish Article in Scientific Reports

Assistant Professor of Biology Dave Angelini and Will Simmons ’17J collaborated to produce a paper on the effects of pesticides on bumblebees published in the March 21 Scientific Reports, which is affiliated with the prestigious journal Nature. In an effort to find physiological mechanics that link “the effect of increased pesticide use and the spread of disease,” they...

Now Collaborators, Professor and Protégé Continue to Explore

By Gerry Boyle ’78 Biologist Dave Angelini and his collaborator, Will Simmons ’17J, have published findings of their three-year study of the effect of pesticides on bumblebees and hope the results will have the scientific community looking for new solutions to the problem. Starting with a bee population kept in tents on campus, Angelini and...

Greene Named Maine Nonprofit Leader of the Year

In recognition of his leadership in Colby College’s transformative success, President David A. Greene has been named Maine’s Nonprofit Leader of the Year by MaineBiz magazine. The honor from the state’s premier business publication came as the College prepared to break ground on a mixed-use development in downtown Waterville, as work neared completion on a...

Hey-Colón to Present at Young Scholars Symposium

Rebeca L. Hey-Colón, assistant professor of Spanish, will be one of six presenters at the April 6-7 Young Scholars Symposium, sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Hey-Colón’s presentation, “The Serpentine River: Anzaldúa’s Spiritual Waters,” reflects her research that establishes connections between the Caribbean diaspora, Chicanx communities, and broader Latinx studies...

Historical Climatology Interviews Fleming

As part of its climate history podcast project, Historical Climatology interviewed James R. Fleming, Colby’s Charles A. Dana Professor of Science, Technology, and Society. The March 8 podcast with Dagomar Degroot “discusses how a plane crash launched Fleming’s career, the deep history and future prospects of geoengineering, and the birth of modern atmospheric science in the early...

Josephson’s Traffic Included on Literary Hub’s March Must-Read List

Traffic, by Professor of History Paul Josephson, was selected as one of 14 books on Literary Hub’s March must-read list. One of Bloomsbury Academic’s Object Lessons series, Traffic, released in March 2017, “considers the history and philosophy of roundabouts, speed bumps, the pedestrian mall, and other efforts to manage traffic,” according to Bloomsbury. “Paul Josephson, through humor and intelligence,...

Blevins Wins Two Sylvias Press Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize

Associate Professor of English Adrian Blevins won the Two Sylvias Press Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize—a poetry contest for women over age 50—for her third book of poems, Appalachians Run Amok, which will be published in spring 2018. The Wilder Series Book Prize draws its inspiration from American author Laura Ingalls Wilder, who published her...

Hatch Quoted in The Japan Times Regarding South Korean “Comfort Women”

Walter Hatch, associate professor of government, commented in a March 4 Japan Times article about a recent ruling in the Seoul Central District Court that “partially affirmed the claims of Korean women who had been sex workers in ‘camp towns’ adjacent to U.S. military bases in the 1960s and ’70s.” The ruling “exposes the hypocrisy...

Paliyenko Receives Fellowship, Gets New Book on Front List

Adrianna Paliyenko, Charles A. Dana Professor of French, makes news again with a fellowship award from the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The visiting research fellowship for January 2018 will support her new book project, Passion and Its Discontents: Rethinking Louisa Siefert’s Body of Work, with archival research to be conducted at the Beinecke...

New English Chair Examines Poetry Through Interdisciplinary Lens

Mary Ellis Gibson, the newly arrived Arthur Jeremiah Roberts Professor of Literature and chair of the English Department, brings remarkable breadth and depth to Colby as a scholar of literature in English, including works by British, American, and Indian authors. Arriving last fall from the University of Glasgow, Gibson is excited about the desire in...

Wilson Addresses Stanton Bird Club

Herb Wilson, the Leslie Brainerd Arey Professor of Biosciences, will address the Stanton Bird Club in Lewiston, Maine, March 6, in a talk titled “The Spring Arrival of Migratory Birds.” The Lewiston Sun Journal reports March 1 that Wilson “has been tracking the arrival dates of over 100 Maine breeding birds for more than 20 years,” and...

Glenn Receives James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowship

Melissa Glenn, associate professor of psychology, is a recipient of a 2017-18 James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowship. For more than 50 years, the fund has provided support for the science and application of psychology. This award includes financial support to extend Glenn’s sabbatical from one semester to two. Her sabbatical activities will include collaborating with colleagues...

Moland Awarded ACLS Fellowship to Support Book Project

Associate Professor of Philosophy Lydia Moland has been awarded an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) fellowship in support of her 2017-18 sabbatical for a book project titled Hegel’s Aesthetics: The Art of Idealism. The ACLS was founded in 1919 to support “excellence in research” and foster “America’s democratic ethos and intellectual aspirations.” The grant will...

Besteman Op-Ed Argues Immigrants Make Cities Better, Not Worse

In a Feb. 24 Portland Press Herald op-ed, Catherine Besteman, Francis F. Bartlett and Ruth K. Bartlett Professor of Anthropology, recounts her struggle to understand Maine state Rep. Lawrence Lockman’s anti-immigrant position. Besteman, who has studied immigrant resettlement for decades, argues that welcoming immigrant populations is actually good for cities and encourages readers to look at the...

Fleming on CBC Radio Podcast with Tremonti

The CBC Radio podcast The Current included Charles A. Dana Professor of Science, Technology, and Society James R. Fleming in a Feb. 20 discussion titled “Can a $500 billion geoengineering project save the Arctic from melting?” In response to this particular project, Fleming told host Anna Marie Tremonti “I think we should study this but we shouldn’t...

Colby Mourns the Loss of Trustee William Oates ’65

William “Billy” A. Oates Jr. ’65, current trustee and member of the Colby Museum of Art Board of Governors, died Feb. 14, 2017, at age 74. Oates, from Dedham, Mass., was an investment advisor and founding partner of Northeast Investment Management in Boston, where he managed Northeast Investors Growth Fund for more than 30 years....

Yossi Roisman’s New Book on Greek Commanders Published

Joseph “Yossi” Roisman, professor of classics and expert on Greek and Roman history and historiography, has a new book out. The Classical Art of Command (Oxford University Press, 2017) examines the career of eight prominent Greek generals, including the Spartan king Leonidas and the Athenian leader Themistocles. “Bringing together extensive use of ancient sources and modern scholarship...

Cote ’95 Receives Meritorious Service Medal

Adam Cote ’95 received the Meritorious Service Medal for his service with the Maine National Guard. “The honor recognizes Cote’s leadership in organizing and carrying out numerous projects of the 133rd Engineer Battalion in communities throughout Maine, from as far north as Houlton to as south as Acton, in 2016,” Foster’s Daily Democrat reports Feb....

Men’s Ice Hockey Season, Coach on WGME TV

Colby’s men’s ice hockey team is kicking ice this year, and WGME-TV caught up with coach Blaise Macdonald and the team at the University of New England. The Mules have been nationally ranked for most of the season, WGME’s Dave Eid reports. “I think when you look at our program, it’s a lot like farming,”...

Ardam Essay in Los Angeles Review of Books

An essay by Visiting Assistant Professor of English Jacquelyn Ardam appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books Jan. 10. Her essay on the podcast My Favorite Murder helps her cope with the memory of the shooting at UCLA, where she studied and taught. “My Favorite Murder feels like a support group for anxious people who are calmed, if not satiated,...