Plesch Delivers Keynote at International Conference in Brazil

Professor of Art Véronique Plesch delivered a plenary lecture at the Colóquio Internacional: Escrita, som e imagem / VI Jornada Intermídia (International Conference Word, Sound, Image / 6th Intermedia Conference), May 9-13 at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Her lecture, “The Wall and the Skin: Writing and Rewriting on a Border Zone,”...

Hennessey ’14 and Dissanayake Article Accepted for Publication

An article by Assistant Professor of Economics Sahan T. M. Dissanayake and Meagan Hennessey ’14, focused on understanding the importance of accounting for sea-level rise for coastal conservation, was accepted for publication in Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, a journal hosted by Cambridge Press. In their paper, Dissanayake and Hennessey first show that ignoring climate...

Stokes Essay on Cancer and Gardening in Organic Life

An essay by Elisabeth Stokes, visiting assistant professor of English, ran in Rodale’s Organic Life May 12. Titled “I Didn’t Know How To Help My Friend Dying Of Cancer, So I Taught Her Son To Garden. Here’s Why,” the essay recounts the time Stokes spent helping her neighbor’s son plant a garden box. “He carefully tended his...

Josephson Contributes to Rachel Carson Center Blog

Professor of History Paul Josephson wrote a blog post on Seeing the Woods, a blog for the Rachel Carson Center. Titled “The Need for Public Environmental History,” Josephson urges historians to “take a much more public voice in describing problems and setting the agenda, and engage a greater number and diversity of audiences through public environmental history.”...

Hey-Colón Named Castañeda Postdoctoral Fellow

Rebeca L. Hey-Colón, assistant professor of Spanish, has been selected as the 2017-18 Carlos E. Castañeda Postdoctoral Fellow in Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. While in Austin, Hey-Colón will be affiliated with the Center for Mexican American and Latino Studies, teaching one course for the center in the spring. Throughout...

New Republic Essay by Hanlon on Disinviting Speakers

Assistant Professor of English Aaron Hanlon writes again for the New Republic, this time about “Why Colleges Have the Right to Reject Hateful Speakers like Ann Coulter.” In his April 24 article, Hanlon writes that “rejecting campus speakers is not an assault on free speech. Rather, like so many other decisions made every day by college...

Sheehan on Fotomuseum’s Still Searching Blog

In March and April 2017, Associate Professor of Art Tanya Sheehan contributed to the Still Searching blog published by the Fotomuseum in Winterthur, Switzerland. Her five-part blog series on photography and migration considers the role of the photographic medium in the human crossing of geographical and cultural borders. The series reflects on the photographic culture of the contemporary global migration crisis, placing it into conversation...

Shea Writes a Piece on Elections in The Nation

Professor of Government Dan Shea wrote a piece, “Our Addiction to Elections is Killing American Democracy,” in which he advocates “embracing other avenues of political engagement” because “our democracy is in big trouble.” In the April 12 issue of The Nation, Shea summarizes America’s history of elections and momentous shifts in our democracy that have led to the...

Stone and Students Publish Seed Dispersal Article in Biotropica

Judy Stone, professor of biology and Dr. Charles C. and Pamela W. Leighton Research Fellow, has published an article in Biotropica, the journal of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation. The article, “Diversity of seeds captured by interception exceeds diversity of seeds deposited in traps,” was written with a team of six Colby students who...

Fleming Reviews Make it Rain in Nature

In the April 5 issue of Nature, James R. Fleming, Colby’s Charles A. Dana Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, reviews Make it Rain: State Control of the Atmosphere in Twentieth-Century America by Kristine C. Harper. In the new book, “historian Kristine Harper treats weather control as a political agent in the hands of the American state,” Fleming writes....

Angelini and Simmons ’17J Publish Article in Scientific Reports

Assistant Professor of Biology Dave Angelini and Will Simmons ’17J collaborated to produce a paper on the effects of pesticides on bumblebees published in the March 21 Scientific Reports, which is affiliated with the prestigious journal Nature. In an effort to find physiological mechanics that link “the effect of increased pesticide use and the spread of disease,”...

Hey-Colón to Present at Young Scholars Symposium

Rebeca L. Hey-Colón, assistant professor of Spanish, will be one of six presenters at the April 6-7 Young Scholars Symposium, sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Hey-Colón’s presentation, “The Serpentine River: Anzaldúa’s Spiritual Waters,” reflects her research that establishes connections between the Caribbean diaspora, Chicanx communities, and broader Latinx studies...

Blevins Wins Two Sylvias Press Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize

Associate Professor of English Adrian Blevins won the Two Sylvias Press Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize—a poetry contest for women over age 50—for her third book of poems, Appalachians Run Amok, which will be published in spring 2018. The Wilder Series Book Prize draws its inspiration from American author Laura Ingalls Wilder, who published her...

Paliyenko Receives Fellowship, Gets New Book on Front List

Adrianna Paliyenko, Charles A. Dana Professor of French, makes news again with a fellowship award from the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The visiting research fellowship for January 2018 will support her new book project, Passion and Its Discontents: Rethinking Louisa Siefert’s Body of Work, with archival research to be conducted at the Beinecke...

Glenn Receives James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowship

Melissa Glenn, associate professor of psychology, is a recipient of a 2017-18 James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowship. For more than 50 years, the fund has provided support for the science and application of psychology. This award includes financial support to extend Glenn’s sabbatical from one semester to two. Her sabbatical activities will include collaborating with colleagues...

Moland Awarded ACLS Fellowship to Support Book Project

Associate Professor of Philosophy Lydia Moland has been awarded an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) fellowship in support of her 2017-18 sabbatical for a book project titled Hegel’s Aesthetics: The Art of Idealism. The ACLS was founded in 1919 to support “excellence in research” and foster “America’s democratic ethos and intellectual aspirations.” The grant will...

Besteman Op-Ed Argues Immigrants Make Cities Better, Not Worse

In a Feb. 24 Portland Press Herald op-ed, Catherine Besteman, Francis F. Bartlett and Ruth K. Bartlett Professor of Anthropology, recounts her struggle to understand Maine state Rep. Lawrence Lockman’s anti-immigrant position. Besteman, who has studied immigrant resettlement for decades, argues that welcoming immigrant populations is actually good for cities and encourages readers to look at the...

Hanlon New York Times Op-Ed Gives Advice for Conservative Students

Assistant Professor of English Aaron Hanlon addresses the conservative media outlets who, he says, have “built a cottage industry of outrage on the premise that conservative students are victims of a ‘tyrannical‘ campus left.” His advice to conservative college students? You’re not a victim—”The leaders and pundits who say otherwise are doing you a disservice”—and use...

Yossi Roisman’s New Book on Greek Commanders Published

Joseph “Yossi” Roisman, professor of classics and expert on Greek and Roman history and historiography, has a new book out. The Classical Art of Command (Oxford University Press, 2017) examines the career of eight prominent Greek generals, including the Spartan king Leonidas and the Athenian leader Themistocles. “Bringing together extensive use of ancient sources and modern scholarship...

Ardam Essay in Los Angeles Review of Books

An essay by Visiting Assistant Professor of English Jacquelyn Ardam appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books Jan. 10. Her essay on the podcast My Favorite Murder helps her cope with the memory of the shooting at UCLA, where she studied and taught. “My Favorite Murder feels like a support group for anxious people who are calmed, if not satiated,...