Courses of Study

International Studies
 
See course descriptions for this department or program 

Director, Associate Professor Jennifer Yoder
Advisory Committee: Professors Priscilla Doel (Spanish), Patrice Franko (Economics and International Studies), Paul Josephson (History), Mary Beth Mills (Anthropology), Kenneth Rodman (Government), Raffael Scheck (History), and James Webb (History); Associate Professors Kimberly Besio (East Asian Studies), Ben Fallaw (History and Latin American Studies), and Jennifer Yoder (Government and International Studies); Assistant Professors Maria Colbert (Spanish), Valérie Dionne (French), Walter Hatch (Government), Arne Koch (German), Maple Razsa (International Studies), Guillermo Vuletin (Economics) and Andreas Waldkirch (Economics)

 
Requirements for the Major in International Studies
Up to 14 courses, including the five courses that constitute the core curriculum; three courses in area studies; three courses from policy studies; and one senior seminar or appropriate independent study (International Studies 491 or 492). At least one seminar or senior project must be completed during the senior year as the capstone experience. Majors must complete a concentration within the major unless they have a double major or minor in African studies, anthropology, economics, government, history, French studies, Spanish, Latin American studies, environmental studies, Russian, East Asian studies, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, or German Studies. Majors also must complete the equivalent of two courses beyond the introductory (usually through 131) level in a modern foreign language. Students are encouraged to develop language skills relevant to their regional specialization. At least one semester of foreign study is required, although under exceptional circumstances students with extensive overseas experience can petition the director and the advisory committee to be exempted. A student must receive a grade of C- or better for a course to count toward the major. No courses listed for the major may be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Note: Students must have at least a 2.70 grade point average by the end of the sophomore year to be eligible for foreign study. Students who do not meet this minimum requirement will not be able to retain their international studies major. 

Note to junior transfer students: The College requires that all students spend at least four semesters in residence at Colby. Therefore, to satisfy the semester abroad requirement for the major, junior transfer students must either stay for a fifth semester or enroll in a summer study-abroad program for at least nine credits (unless the study-abroad requirement has been met in some other way).
 
Courses Composing the Core Curriculum
Anthropology 112, Economics 133 and 134, Government 131, and History 276.
 
 
Honors Program in International Studies

An honors program is available in which the student can pursue a year-long independent research project that also fulfills the seminar requirement; successful completion of this project may entitle the student to graduate “With Honors in International Studies.” To be eligible, a student must have a grade point average of 3.50 or better in the major and should submit a statement of intent to the program director by May 1 of the junior year. A workshop on writing honors proposals will be held in early September of the senior year, and the final deadline for submission of a completed honors thesis proposal is the third Friday in September. See the International Studies Handbook for further information about procedures, including midyear evaluation and deadline for completion of the thesis.

 
Requirements for Concentrations
Majors are required to complete either a regional or policy concentration unless they have a double major or minor in Anthropology, Chinese, East Asian Studies, Economics, Environmental Studies, French Studies, German Studies, Government, History, Italian, Japanese, Latin American Studies, Russian, or Spanish. Students may propose an independent concentration. Concentrations should be declared by the spring of the sophomore year. 
 
 
Regional Concentrations
A regional concentration requires completion of the following: 
  • four courses dealing with a specific region. Courses appropriate to each region are listed above under the area studies component. At least two of those courses should be taken at Colby. At least one of the four courses must be drawn from the social sciences and at least one other from the humanities.
  • a coordination of area specialization with study abroad. For European concentrators, study abroad would normally take place in a non-English-speaking country.
  • a coordination of the language requirement with foreign study where Colby offers an appropriate program.
  • a seminar project or independent study in the senior year that addresses issues in the chosen area.

Policy or Functional Concentrations
Five tracks have been established for policy concentrations:

Each track requires at least four courses designated as relevant to the respective field plus a seminar or an independent senior project relevant to the chosen specialization. Note that some of the courses appropriate for these concentrations are not designated as international studies courses. While they are relevant to their respective specialization, they do not count toward the requirements for the major or the grade point average in the major. These courses are designated by an asterisk (*).
 
International Relations/Foreign Policy
Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) in addition to four of the courses listed below, two of which should be from the Government Department and one from the Economics Department. Introduction to American Government is strongly encouraged as an additional course.
  • Economics
    • 333 Evolution of the Global Economy
    • 335 Economic Development
    • 378 International Trade
    • 471 Multinational Corporations
    • 479 The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
  • Government 
    • 231 United States Foreign Policy: The Cold War
    •    
    • 238 Politics of War Crime Tribunals
    • 256 Conflict in East Asia
    • 332 International Organization
    • 334 International Environmental Regimes
    • 335 United States-Latin American Relations
    • 354 The European Union
    • 357 Political Economy of Regionalism
    • 359 Political Ideologies and Revolutionary Movements in Europe
    • 432 Seminar: United States Foreign Policy
    • 435 Memory and Politics
  • History 
    • 275 Strongmen and Populism in Modern Spain and Latin America
    • 322 Europe and the Second World War
    • 347 America in Vietnam
    • 374 Religion and World War II
    • 447 Seminar: The Cold War
  • concentrations ↑

     
 
International Economic Policy
Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below; one must be outside economics: 
  • Anthropology
    • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
  • Economics 
    • 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary Latin America
    • 271 International Economic Integration
    • 273 Economics of Globalization
    • 292 Economic Transition in China
    • 294 Economic Policy and Performance in East Asia
    •  
    • 333 Evolution of the Global Economy
    • 335 Economic Development
    • 373 Open-Economy Macroeconomics
    • 378  International Trade
    • 435 Latin American Economic Development
    • 471 Multinational Corporations
    • 474 Economic Demography
    • 479 The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
  • Government
    • 332 International Organization
    • 354 The European Union
    • 357 Political Economy of Regionalism
  • History 
    • 364 Ecological and Economic History of Africa

concentrations↑

 
Development Studies
Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below, one of which is Anthropology 256, one drawn from from Economics 214, 292, or 294, and one outside of anthropology and economics:
  • Anthropology 
    • 213 Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples
    •  
    • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
    • 297A Globalizing Africa
    • 297B Culture, Power, and International Development
    • 355 Development, Globalization, and Poverty
  • East Asian Studies
    • 254 China in Transition
    •  
     
  • Economics 
    • 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary Latin America
    • 292 Economic Transition in China
    • 294 Economic Policy and Performance in East Asia
    • 335 Economic Development
    • 378 International Trade
    • 435 Latin American Economic Development
    • 471 Multinational Corporations
    • 474 Economic Demography
  • French 
    • 372 France and Africa
  • Government
     
    • 252 Politics of the Middle East
    • 253 Latin American Politics
    • 333 Globalization and Social Innovation
    • 353 Promoting Democracy in Transitional Countries
    • 450 Seminar: Democratization in Latin America
    • 451 Seminar: Political Violence, Revolutions, and Ethnic Conflict
    • 454 Politics of Development
  • History 
    • 364 Ecological and Economic History of Africa
    • 394 Ecological History
  • International Studies
    • 397 Internationalism: From Socialism to the World Social Forum
  • Sociology 
    • 274 Social Inequality and Power

concentrations↑

 
Global Environmental Studies
Four courses (plus a relevant senior seminar or independent paper), at least three of which must be drawn from the following:
  • Anthropology
    • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
  • Economics 
    • 231 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    • 4-- Economics Seminar (if topic is appropriate)
  • Environmental Studies
     
    • 235 International Environmental Human Rights
    • 334 International Environmental Regimes
    • 338 Climate Change Politics
    • 339 Development, Trade, and the Environment
    •  
    • 341 Environmental Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
    • 493 Environmental Policy Practicum
  • Government 
    • 235 Sustainable Development
    • 333 Globalization and Social Innovation
    • 334 International Environmental Law
    • 357 Political Economy of Regionalism
  • History 
    • 394 Ecological History
    • 446 Research Seminar: Historical Epidemiology
  • International Studies 
    • 297B International Environmental Human Rights
The fourth course can be taken from the above or from one of the courses listed below: 
  • Economics 
    • 214 Economic Policy and Performance in Contemporary Latin America
  • Government 
    • 332 International Organization
  • History 
    • 364 Ecological and Economic History of Africa

concentrations↑

 
Human Rights/Social Justice
Students must take a relevant senior seminar (or senior paper) and take four of the courses listed below, two of which are drawn from a core of Anthropology 256, 452, Government 333, International Studies 211, Sociology 274.
 
  • Anthropology 
    • 213 Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples
    •  
    • 235 Ethnographies of Latin America: Violence and Democracy in the Andes
    • 236 Illegal Drugs, Law, and the State
    • 256 Land, Food, Culture, and Power
    • 341 Culture, Mobility, Identity: Encounters in the African Diaspora
    • 452 Anthropology of Power
  • Government 
    • 272* Modern Political Theory
    • 333 Globalization and Social Innovation
    • 355 Winners and Losers in Chinese Politics
    • 356 Winners and Losers in Japanese Politics
    • 451 Seminar: Political Violence, Revolutions, and Ethnic Conflict
  • International Studies
    • 211 Human Rights and Social Struggles in Global Perspective
    • 235 International Environmental Human Rights
    • 397 Internationalism: From Socialism to the World Social Forum
    • 437 Media, Culture, and the Political Imagination
  • Philosophy 
    • 236* Social and Political Philosophy
  • Sociology
     
    • 274* Social Inequality and Power
  •  
  • Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
    • 311* Topics in Feminist Theory

concentrations↑