FAQ: Heat in Academic & Administrative Buildings

The College turns the heat on each year when the outside temperatures drop below 55 degrees on a regular basis. Since it is based on weather, there is no pre-determined day, but it usually falls during late September or early October.


If you do not find the answer to your question please let us know!
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At what temperature is the heat set?
The heat in academic and administrative buildings is set to maintain a temperature between 65 and 70 degrees. We are not able to control the heat on a room by room basis. The heat in the buildings generally operates on two or more zones depending on factors such as relationship to the sun and location of the room within the building. Outside air temperature, room size, number of windows, number of exterior walls, number of people, and amount and placement of furniture in a room all impact the temperature.

My radiator isn't even warm, how do I turn it on?
The radiators are not warm all the time. When the sensor reads that the temperature in your zone is correct, the heat to the radiators will stop generating more heat until the sensor reads a temperature that is below the set point.

Contact Information:

PPD Hot/Cold line
x5016

PPD office
x5000

Submit a request via the
Work Order Form

Email us

After hours, call Security
x5530

Please be sure to provide your name, phone number, hall, room number, type of problem, and what parts of the building are affected.

 
What should I do if my room is too hot?
First, you can check on a couple possible causes.
  • Is the outside temperature much warmer today than yesterday? (The heating system in a large building can be slower to adjust to fluctuating outside temperatures. This can be a particular problem in the fall and spring when the daily highs can vary by 20 or 30 degrees.)
  • Is there a window or door open elsewhere in the building that could be activating the heat?
If these do not seem to be the cause, please do the following:
  1. DO NOT simply open the window. It wastes energy, it will not solve the problem and it may, in fact, make it worse.
  2. Submit a work order to PPD. Please ensure that you provide your name, phone number, building, room number, type of problem, and what parts of the building are impacted.

What should I do if my room is too cold?
First, you can check on a couple possible causes.

  • Make sure that the radiator or baseboard heat is not obstructed. If furniture is placed directly in front of the heat, pull it away from the wall to allow the air to circulate. Built in or large furniture pieces can be an obstruction and should not be placed on walls that have a heat source.
  • Check to make sure that there are no heat producing items (i.e. refrigerator, computer, lamp) placed in front of a thermostat or sensor. This would give a false reading of warm temperatures to the thermostat/sensor.
  • It is not uncommon for rooms to be cooler in the early morning hours. For energy conservation reasons, heat and temperatures are set back in most buildings overnight. Also, it is beneficial to have early morning temperatures slightly lower so that heat generated throughout the day by people, equipment and sunshine do not cause classrooms and other meeting spaces to be too warm.
  • Ensure that you are not sitting directly under a supply vent. The fresh air supplied to many rooms is warm, but not intended for heating purposes. It often feels cooler as it passes across your body, much like a breeze feels cool even on a warm summer day.
  • Check to make sure that there are no windows open. When closed, windows must be securely latched. If you have a storm window, ensure it is down and locked as well.
  • Make sure you are dressed for the season. In light clothing many people feel chilly at 65-70 degrees.
If these do not seem to be the cause, please do the following:
  1. DO NOT bring in a space heater. They are a potential safety hazard, they waste energy, they will not solve the problem and may, in fact, make it worse.
  2. Submit a work order to PPD. Please ensure that you provide your name, phone number, building, room number, type of problem, and what parts of the building are impacted.