French Studies


Courses of Study

FR125fs    French I First in a sequence that develops communication skills in a careful progression over three semesters. In addition to working on the four traditional skills of language acquisition—speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing—students will be introduced to the cultural contexts of France and the Francophone world. Use of audio and videotaped material is an integral and required part of class work. Students are placed in the appropriate level by their score on the College Board French SAT Subject test, a placement test during fall orientation, or through consultation with a member of the faculty in French. Four credit hours. Falantin, Niang
FR126fs    French II Strengthens and expands the skills introduced and practiced in French 125 by offering a learning environment conducive to the practice and development of writing, reading, listening, and oral performance. Because language practice is closely tied to cultural understanding, we use authentic texts and contexts that foster linguistic competence while highlighting the diversified cultural contribution of the French and Francophone world. Four credit hours. Dionne, Mauguiere
FR127fs    French III The last course in the required language sequence (French 125-127) that develops communication skills in a careful progression over three semesters. In addition to working on the four traditional skills of speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing, students are encouraged to develop critical thinking through reading and language learning. Four credit hours. Brunetaux, Paliyenko
FR127Jj    French III (Paris) An intensive version of the last course in the required language sequence, held in Paris, France. Students not only learn French (developing their speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing abilities), they use French to learn, doing analytical work related to France's past (using Louis Malle's screenplay and film Au Revoir les enfants as a point of departure) and France's present (through class excursions). Students also learn to adapt to a foreign culture while immersed in a French-speaking environment. Estimated cost: $3,000. Prerequisite: French 126 or equivalent. Three credit hours. Davies
FR128f    Cultural Encounters: Engaging with Literature and Media Builds reading skills in French and broadens cultural knowledge of the Francophone world through a wide variety of texts and media. Emphasis is on the texts and contexts of culture, whether in France and/or in the Francophone world. Engages students in critical thinking and develops writing and oral expression. Prerequisite: French 127. Four credit hours. L. Mauguiere
FR131s    Debating Social Issues Designed specifically for students wishing to develop oral skills and to acquire an extensive modern vocabulary to analyze and debate current societal issues pertaining to the French and Francophone world. This course will also improve students reading and writing skills, while developing cross-cultural competency. Through a variety of media, films, and texts students will develop analytical, critical and creative thinking. Prerequisite: French 127 or a score of 60 on the College Board French SAT Subject Test or its equivalent on the placement test. Four credit hours. Mauguiere
[FR132]    Boundaries and Margins: Speaker Series Listed as Theater and Dance 132. One credit hour.
[FR223]    French Theater Workshop Designed for students wishing to develop their French language skills in a less traditional environment. Through close study of French plays, students acquire in-depth knowledge of contemporary French theater. As their final project, they have the unique opportunity to select, direct, and perform a French play. This workshop engages students in collaborative and experiential learning. Emphasis on analysis, drama performance, French oral practice, and creativity. No prior acting experience required. May be repeated once for additional credit. Prerequisite: A 200-level French course. Four credit hours.
[FR224]    French Studies Lab Project Students hone their skills in oral and written French through "hands-on" learning. Projects focused on a specific issue or topic may include: arts initiative involving the community and Colby museum, creative performance or exhibit, design project, Digital Humanities platforms, educational materials for local schools, environmental initiatives, field work, non-profit work and engagement with local organizations, public podcast, social media, and translation. This experiential course fosters intellectual curiosity, collaboration, learning by doing, problem solving, critical and creative thinking along with skills in research and project management. Four credit hours.
FR231fs    Advanced Grammar and Composition Provides a comprehensive overview of French grammar through presentations of the overall structure and frequent practice in writing. Required of majors and open to others wishing to improve their written expression in French. Prerequisite: French 128, 131, or 240D. Four credit hours. Falantin
[FR232]    French Cultural History: The Rise and Fall of Versailles From the end of the Renaissance to the beginnings of revolution: an introduction to the major figures, movements, and works of 17th- and 18th-century France. Continued development of the ability to read, speak, and write in French, while also enhancing analytical skills. Prerequisite: French 128, 131, or 240D. Four credit hours. H.
FR234fs    Intensive Spoken French Exclusively for French majors or students preparing for study in a French-speaking country. Weekly practice in oral French conducted by the French language assistant under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated once for credit. Nongraded. Prerequisite: Acceptance in a study-abroad program in a French-speaking country. One credit hour. Delice
[FR236]    Introduction to the Francophone World: The Americas A comprehensive introduction to the French colonial and postcolonial cultural impact across the Americas. Students will examine issues of race, cultural and linguistic identity, cultural survival, and the concept of emerging literature in a minority context. The cultural connection between Louisiana, Haiti, French Guiana, as well as contemporary Francophone migrant literature will be examined. Prerequisite: French 128, 131, 231, or 240D. Four credit hours. I.
FR237f    Francophone African Cinema An introduction to major sub-Saharan Francophone filmmakers and their engagement with certain aspects of African history and cultural practices. Students will discuss and write about the films and the issues they deal with. Supplemental readings will be provided to contextualize the films. Prerequisite: French 128 or 131. Four credit hours. Niang
FR238s    Introduction to the Francophone World: Africa What does the term "Francophone" mean? Is it free from polemics? What is its history? Introduction to Africa from the 19th to the 21st century surveys many of the multifaceted cultural identities and histories of the former French-speaking colonies on the continent. Topics include colonization, politics, gender, language, the fight for independence, modernity and tradition, and the major literary movements in Francophone Africa. Course materials will include film, music, art, folktales, poetry, maps, newspaper articles, literary works, excerpts from scholarly texts, and films. Prerequisite: French 128, 131, or 240D. Four credit hours. I. Niang
FR240s    Surrealism Listed as Art 238. Four credit hours. A. Plesch
[FR243]    French Pronunciation through Phonetics How do you know how to pronounce a word in French, without someone pronouncing it for you first? How can you truly decide if some letters should be pronounced or not? One of the main objectives of the French studies major is mastery of near-native pronunciation and the ability to continue to learn to speak French autonomously, as you come in contact with French speakers. Through an exploration of French and Francophone music, this course will give you the theoretical foundations to understand the logic behind the French pronunciation system, practice in the form of pronunciation labs, and a hands-on speaking project. Prerequisite: French 128, 131, or 240D. Four credit hours.
FR252s    Provocative Texts: A Critical Toolbox How does one approach print and/or visual culture critically? Students engage with a range of "texts," such as poetry, works of art, theater, short stories, novels, and/or film, to acquire the tools and methods of critical interpretation and analysis. Significant writing accompanies close reading of what a particular "text" does and thus how it "speaks" or conveys meaning. Students apply genre-specific vocabulary and take interdisciplinary and analytical approaches to response papers, interpretive essays, and/or multifaceted digital/video projects. Prerequisite: French 128, 131, or 240D. Four credit hours. L, I. Paliyenko
[FR256]    Film for Thought: The Art of French Cinema A survey of directors, genres, movements, and aesthetics in French cinema from early 20th Century to the present day. Emphasis on the analysis of film style and form: mise-en-sc±ne, cinematography, editing, sound, performance, etc. Students will approach film not only as a form of art, but also as a site of memory and/or a tool of socio-political discourse. Film theory will frame our class discussions. Students will develop visual literacy, analytical skills, critical and creative thinking through innovative visual projects, essays and class discussions. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 128 or 131. Four credit hours. A.
FR258f    Provocative Texts: Fake News, Secrets, and Controversies In this course, we will approach Francophone culture differently, by considering some of the most famous secrets, mysteries or "fake news" in French History, from the Renaissance era to the present. We will ask, for instance, who really was Nostradamus? Who poisoned the court at Versailles in the 17th Century? Was Marie-Antoinette responsible for the French Revolution? Is Bonaparte the creator of the FBI? Using a variety of media (short stories, fairy tales, plays, movies, documentaries, and newspaper articles), we will explore critically how those questions came to exist and circulate often based on economic, judicial or political decisions. The course will include discussions of cross-cultural differences or similarities between the United States and French speaking countries on some of these questions. Prerequisite: French 128, 131, or 240D. Four credit hours. L, I. Falantin
[FR324]    Ideologies of Africans: Negritude, Pan-Africanism, and Afroisms Engages with ideologies of Africans such as negritude, pan-Africanism, Afropolitanism and Afropeanism. We will examine these characteristics of African modernity through a critical study of literary, historical and theoretical works by Líopold Sõdar Senghor, Cheikh Anta Diop, Abdourahman Waberi, Achille Mbembe, Lĺonora Miano, Fatou Diome, etc. What do these ideologies/theories stipulate in terms of identity and space? In what ways are they constructive of a postcolonial alternative modernity? How do they deconstruct epistemic violence, colonial balkanization, and rethink the African's place in the local and the global? These questions will guide students' research, presentations, and creative/analytical writing. Humanities lab course. Four credit hours. L.
[FR326]    Sustainable Development in/of the French-Speaking World Will examine how cities from throughout the French-speaking world are enacting solutions for sustainable living. Blending the environmental humanities with cultural studies, we will seek to understand the challenges cities face—including legacies of imperialism, fraught relations with indigenous peoples, and social inequalities—and the solutions these cities have introduced. Learning goals include examining how cities from throughout the French-speaking world are responding to climate change; studying how responding to climate change dovetails with the fight for social justice; and solidifying advanced-level proficiency in French. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course. Four credit hours.
[FR332]    Voices of Dissent in Early Modern France or the Quest for Freedom An introduction to free-thinkers and libertines, and an exploration of the concept of freedom. We shall consider great thinkers and provocative writers like Montaigne, Molière, Diderot, and Sade, who challenged religious and social norms in search of a more just society. Through close reading of texts, and discussion of the their historical and cultural context, from the wars of religion to the French revolution, we will study how the writers dissimulate their controversial opinions, while advocating liberté de pensée in the face of fanaticism and dogmatic thinking. This course will conclude with Laclos' great book Dangerous Liaisons. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. L.
[FR351]    Minority Issues and Social Change in the Americas Examines issues of cultural representation, migration, diaspora, and social change primarily in Quebec, Maine, and Louisiana. Postcolonial, transatlantic, and border theories will be used to better understand the French experience in the Americas. Goals include developing critical reading, presentation, and writing skills. Students will analyze print and visual texts, including films and oral stories, and they will contribute to a digital humanities project as part of an on-going, interdisciplinary effort to remap America and American studies. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. L, I.
FR354s    Parisian Encounters: Great Loves, Grand Passions The sexual and racial selection of genius exposes the weight of prejudice against creative women in French cultural history. In studying the impact of "great" couples during the long 19th century (1789-1914), we shall map and interrogate their legacies across a broad sweep of (colonial) history, the arts, letters, and sciences. Learning goals emphasize interdisciplinary practice of critical analysis, close study of images and works of art in the Colby Museum, and the development of advanced oral and written expression in French. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. H, I. Paliyenko
[FR355]    The Other French Empire, Then and Now The French trailed behind the British, not abolishing slave trade until 1815 and slavery in 1848. Yet, beginning in 1850, French colonial expansion was dramatic. By 1914, France possessed the second-largest colonial empire in the world. How do different generations of thinkers and artists represent this past, which is ever present? Students gain knowledge of French colonization and skills in cross-cultural analysis. They engage in critical thinking across disciplines not only via the course material but also as they conduct archival research on a topic of their choice to produce an original website or other creative project. Prerequisite: Senior or junior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. L, I.
FR361s    Creolization, Culture, and Society in the Indian Ocean Islands Explores issues of race, gender, identity, diversity, cultural contact, and conflict in Indian Ocean island cultures and literatures written in French through selected writings from Mauritius, Madagascar, Reunion, the Seychelles, and the Comoros. We will examine the complex social, cultural, and historical context of the region with an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include slavery, "marronage", cultural hybridity, "métissage," "coolitude," and the development of colonial and postcolonial identities and subjectivities. Students will develop their presentation and writing skills through the production of critical essays and research projects. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. I. Mauguiere
[FR370]    Corps, Espace, et Genre: Postcolonial Space in Francophone Africa The transition from the colonial to the postcolonial in Francophone Africa changed the way in which post-independence writers and filmmakers engage with space. These writers and filmmakers treat family and collective anthropological spaces in conjunction with the body and/or self. Through analysis of novels, short stories, essays, and films from the 20th and 21st centuries, along with postcolonial concepts of hybridity, resistance, and the subaltern, we examine the politics and praxis of the body in space as it relates to gender, age, identity, ritualized performance, and belief systems. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. I.
[FR371]    L'écriture de soi Explores concepts of memory and self-fashioning in autobiographical writing, and questions the (im)possibilities of writing the self. Through theoretical readings, students will acquire a better understanding of the processes by which memoirs, autobiographies, and oral/written testimonies are produced. Particular attention will be paid to narratives that deal with traumatic personal and historical events. Discussions and debates, informed by theoretical readings and supplementary material, will develop critical and analytical skills. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. L.
FR374f    Food for Thought: French Cuisine and Culinary Identities What is the state of French cuisine today? Has French cuisine embraced a more inclusive, multifaceted mosaic of talents, culinary practices, flavors, and tastes, or is it still a monolithic, elitist institution hermetic to change? This course seeks to re-evaluate and critique French cuisine and gastronomy through a decolonial lens to decenter the narrative on food and culinary traditions in France Ƒ main focus on the culinary talents, histories, identities, and traditions of communities of color. Humanities Lab designed around food labs, creative projects, and the analysis of cooking shows, films, cookbooks, menus, food blogs and podcasts. Humanities lab course. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course. Four credit hours. I. Brunetaux
[FR375]    Narratives of Identities in Francophone African Literature The quest for and celebration of identity are key thematic and aesthetic components in contemporary Francophone African literature and cinema. We will engage with works of fiction and film that provide a narrative of identity within the framework of African cultures such as sub-Saharan Africa or the Maghreb. Focus will be on communal and individual identities within the framework of ethnicity and/or tribalism. Students will learn how and why these writers and filmmakers narrate identity, and will engage with African identities through structured writing, oral presentations, captivating readings of texts, and film screening. Prerequisite: A 200-level course in French. Four credit hours.
[FR376]    Shadows of the Past: Remembering Vichy France and the Shoah How to represent the Holocaust through aesthetic forms without trivializing its horrors? How to translate into words the excruciating void, silence, and pain felt after the return from the camps? How has France grappled with its responsibility in the roundups and deportations of Jews during WWII and memorialized this shameful past? This course will explore how French writers and filmmakers have found creative ways to work through past traumas and convey the unthinkable through words and images. Emphasis on creative and critical thinking, literary and film analysis. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course. Four credit hours. L.
FR377f    Staging Justice: The Theater of Revolt In this course, we will question what tragedies can teach us today. Students will look at rewritings of the myths of Iphigenia, Antigone and Medea through plays and films, and how their stories have been adapted to reflect social, political, and cultural changes in France and the Francophone world, especially on the topics of justice, feminism, and race. We will especially question the role of human sacrifice, witches, and the agency of women through time. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. L, I. Dionne
[FR378]    French Revolution and Human Rights The French Revolution ushered in the modern world through the concepts of freedom, equality, and fraternity. We will hone critical skills by analyzing the development of those concepts during the Enlightenment, focusing especially on the questions of natural (human) rights and tolerance in Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Beaumarchais, and Condorcet. We will hone communication skills while examining the consequences of those concepts, interrogating the justification for revolutionary terror, discussing whether the French Revolution was a success or a failure, and considering controversial figures like Marie-Antoinette, Robespierre, and Marat. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one other 200-level course, preferably two. Four credit hours. H.
[FR379]    Race and Gender in France From Josephine Baker to the blackface controversies of the recent years, France has always had a fraught relationship with race, largely rooted in, and compounded by, its colonial history. Black/African, afro-descendant, brown men and women continue to face racial exclusion, discrimination, and exoticization in color-blind France. This course challenges the countryůs problematic discourse on race and gender, and its systemic racism, through a critical analysis of film, performance, art, fashion, online media, advertising, podcasts, and social justice movements. Emphasis placed on black feminisms, critical race theory, and intersectionality. Prerequisite: French 231 and at least one 300-level French course. Four credit hours. A, I.
FR483f, 484s    Senior Honors Thesis The senior honors thesis counts as one of the 10 courses required for the major. The thesis, written in French, is to be a substantial study of a carefully defined topic, supported by critical sources. Prerequisite: A 3.5 or higher major average at the end of the junior year and permission of the department. Three credit hours.
FR491f, 492s    Independent Study Individual projects in areas where the student has demonstrated the interest and competence necessary for independent work. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Two to four credit hours. Faculty
[FR493B]    Seminar: Narratives of Identities in Francophone African Literature The quest for and celebration of identity are key thematic and aesthetic components in contemporary Francophone-African literature and cinema. We will engage with works of fiction and film that provide a narrative of identity within the framework of African cultures such as sub-Saharan Africa or the Maghreb. Focus will be on communal and individual identities within the framework of ethnicity and/or tribalism. Students will learn how and why these writers and filmmakers narrate identity and will engage with African identities through structured writing, oral presentations, captivating readings of texts, and film screening. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours.
[FR493C]    Seminar: Minority Issues and Social Change in the Americas Examines issues of cultural representation, migration, diaspora, and social change primarily in Quebec, Maine, and Louisiana. Postcolonial, transatlantic, and border theories will be used to better understand the French experience in the Americas. Goals include developing critical reading, presentation, and writing skills. Students will analyze print and visual texts, including films and oral stories, and they will contribute to a digital humanities project as part of an on-going, interdisciplinary effort to remap America and American studies. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. L, I.
FR493Ds    Seminar: Parisian Encounters: Great Loves, Grand Passions Sexual and racial selection of genius exposes the weight of prejudice against creative women in French cultural history. In studying the impact of "great" couples during the long 19th century (1789-1914), we shall map and interrogate their legacies across a broad sweep of (colonial) history, the arts, letters, and sciences. Learning goals emphasize interdisciplinary practice of critical analysis, close study of images and works of art in the Colby Museum, and the development of advanced oral and written expression in French. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. Paliyenko
FR493Es    Seminar: Creolization, Culture, and Society in the Indian Ocean Islands Explores issues of race, gender, identity, diversity, cultural contact, and conflict in Indian Ocean island cultures and literatures written in French through selected writings from Mauritius, Madagascar, Reunion, the Seychelles, and the Comoros. We will examine the complex social, cultural, and historical context of the region with an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include slavery, "marronage", cultural hybridity, "métissage," "coolitude," and the development of colonial and postcolonial identities and subjectivities. Students will develop their presentation and writing skills through the production of critical essays and research projects. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. I. Mauguiere
[FR493F]    Seminar: Ideologies of Africans: Negritude, Pan-Africanism, and Afroisms Engages with ideologies of Africans such as negritude, pan-Africanism, Afropolitanism and Afropeanism. We will examine these characteristics of African modernity through a critical study of literary, historical and theoretical works by Líopold Sõdar Senghor, Cheikh Anta Diop, Abdourahman Waberi, Achille Mbembe, Lĺonora Miano, Fatou Diome, etc. What do these ideologies/theories stipulate in terms of identity and space? In what ways are they constructive of a postcolonial alternative modernity? How do they deconstruct epistemic violence, colonial balkanization, and rethink the African's place in the local and the global? These questions will guide students' research, presentations, and creative/analytical writing. Humanities lab course. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. L.
[FR493G]    Seminar: Sustainable Development in/of the French-Speaking World Will examine how cities from throughout the French-speaking world are enacting solutions for sustainable living. Blending the environmental humanities with cultural studies, we will seek to understand the challenges cities face—including legacies of imperialism, fraught relations with indigenous peoples, and social inequalities—and the solutions these cities have introduced. Learning goals include examining how cities from throughout the French-speaking world are responding to climate change; studying how responding to climate change dovetails with the fight for social justice; and solidifying advanced-level proficiency in French. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. L, I.
[FR493H]    Seminar: French Revolution and Human Rights The French Revolution ushered in the modern world through the concepts of freedom, equality, and fraternity. We will hone critical skills by analyzing the development of those concepts during the Enlightenment, focusing especially on the questions of natural (human) rights and tolerance in Voltaire, Rousseau, Montesquieu, and Condorcet. We will hone communication skills while examining the consequences of those concepts, interrogating the justification for revolutionary terror, discussing whether the French Revolution was a success or a failure, and considering controversial figures like Marie-Antoinette, Robespierre, and Marat. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. H.
[FR493I]    Seminar: Voices of Dissent in Early Modern France or the Quest for Freedom An introduction to free-thinkers and libertines, and an exploration of the concept of freedom. We shall consider great thinkers and provocative writers like Montaigne, Molière, Diderot, and Sade, who challenged religious and social norms in search of a more just society. Through close reading of texts, and discussion of the their historical and cultural context, from the wars of religion to the French revolution, we will study how the writers dissimulate their controversial opinions, while advocating liberté de pensée in the face of fanaticism and dogmatic thinking. This course will conclude with Laclos' great book Dangerous Liaisons. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours.
[FR493K]    Seminar: The Other French Empire: Then and Now The French trailed behind the British, not abolishing slave trade until 1815 and slavery in 1848. Yet, beginning in 1850, French colonial expansion was dramatic. By 1914, France possessed the second-largest colonial empire in the world. How do different generations of thinkers and artists represent this past, which is ever present? Students gain knowledge of French colonization and skills in cross-cultural analysis. They engage in critical thinking across disciplines not only via the course material but also as they conduct archival research on a topic of their choice to produce an original website or other creative project. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours.
[FR493L]    Seminar: Race and Gender in France From Josephine Baker to the blackface controversies of the recent years, France has always had a fraught relationship with race, largely rooted in, and compounded by, its colonial history. Black/African, afro-descendant, brown men and women continue to face racial exclusion, discrimination, and exoticization in color-blind France. This course challenges the country’s problematic discourse on race and gender, and its systemic racism, through a critical analysis of film, performance, art, fashion, online media, advertising, podcasts, and social justice movements. Emphasis placed on black feminisms, critical race theory, and intersectionality. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. A, I.
FR493Mf    Seminar: Staging Justice: The Theater of Revolt In this course, we will question what tragedies can teach us today. Students will look at rewritings of the myths of Iphigenia, Antigone and Medea through plays and films, and how their stories have been adapted to reflect social, political, and cultural changes in France and the Francophone world, especially on the topics of justice, feminism, and race. We will especially question the role of human sacrifice, witches, and the agency of women through time. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. Dionne
[FR493N]    Seminar: L'ecriture de soi Explores concepts of memory and self-fashioning in autobiographical writing, and questions the (im)possibilities of writing the self. Through theoretical readings, students will acquire a better understanding of the processes by which memoirs, autobiographies, and oral/written testimonies are produced. Particular attention will be paid to narratives that deal with traumatic personal and historical events. Discussions and debates, informed by theoretical readings and supplementary material, will develop critical and analytical skills. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French Studies major. Four credit hours. L.
[FR493P]    Seminar: Time for Outrage! Disenfranchised Subjects, Political Struggles Provides an overview of major political struggles that shaped Frances understanding and commitment to social justice from 1960s to today. Whether about women, LGBTQ, prisoners, immigrants, racial groups, working class, the movements will be analyzed independently and in relation with each other in order to uncover convergences but also conflicting views on the ways to conduct collective actions and contribute to the empowerment of minorities. The study of films, manifestos, novels, podcasts, and political discourses, will be the basis of debates on citizenship, communitarianism, identity politics, and social privilege. Prerequisite: iSenior standing as a French Studies major. Four credit hours. L, I.
[FR493Q]    Seminar: Shadows of the Past: Remembering Vichy France and the Shoah How to represent the Holocaust through aesthetic forms without trivializing its horrors? How to translate into words the excruciating void, silence, and pain felt after the return from the camps? How has France grappled with its responsibility in the roundups and deportations of Jews during WWII and memorialized this shameful past? This course will explore how French writers and filmmakers have found creative ways to work through past traumas and convey the unthinkable through words and images. Emphasis on creative and critical thinking, literary and film analysis. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. L.
[FR493R]    Seminar: Breaking Free: Coming-of-Age Literature in the Francophone World Summer 1954: A scandal of international magnitude arises in France. The 18-year-old novelist Franaoise Sagan is censored by the Vatican and banned in South Africa, Poland and Spain under penalty of fine and imprisonment for writing a novel deemed morally unacceptable. In 1957, the young Assia Djebar suffers the same fate in Algeria, and this phenomenon spreads to Lebanon, Syria, Haƀti, Vietnam and Iran where young women turn to writing to express their need for sexual liberation and emancipation from patriarchy. This course explores this revolutionary literature that challenged conservative societies, while engaging students in discussions on feminism, literary production, civic rights, the concept of freedom, and equality, among others. A close study of pop culture (songs, fashion and lifestyle magazines) will complement the analysis of these coming-of-age stories. This course will include various theoretical and sociological essays, historical films and documentaries to help situate the context in which these texts were produced. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours.
FR493Sf    Seminar: Food for Thought: French Cuisine and Culinary Identities What is the state of French cuisine today? Has French cuisine embraced a more inclusive, multifaceted mosaic of talents, culinary practices, flavors, and tastes, or is it still a monolithic, elitist institution hermetic to change? This course seeks to re-evaluate and critique French cuisine and gastronomy through a decolonial lens to decenter the narrative on food and culinary traditions in France Ƒ main focus on the culinary talents, histories, identities, and traditions of communities of color. Humanities Lab designed around food labs, creative projects, and the analysis of cooking shows, films, cookbooks, menus, food blogs and podcasts. Humanities lab course. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a French studies major. Four credit hours. Brunetaux