Spanish Department


Courses of Study

SP125fs    Elementary Spanish I The first semester of three consecutive courses designed to develop fluency and accuracy in the Spanish language. Through an interactive approach to language learning, students gain communicative proficiency through fast-paced, task- and content-based exercises designed to integrate listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Videos, audio, and web materials introduce students to cultural differences within the Spanish speaking world. Four credit hours. Almeyda-Cohen, Miller
SP126fs    Elementary Spanish II The second of three consecutive courses designed to develop fluency and accuracy in the Spanish language. Through a continued interactive approach to teaching and learning, students begin to develop skills for more independent communicative proficiency. Task- and content-based assignments challenge students to integrate listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in a functional use of the language. Videos, audio, and web materials are incorporated. Prerequisite: Spanish 125. Four credit hours. Bernal Heredia, Mayans, Miller, Raboso Manas
[SP126H]    Spanish Language for Heritage Learners Designed for students who come from a variety of Spanish speaking family backgrounds and have some knowledge of Spanish. The purpose of this course is to revitalize and gain confidence in the Spanish you have acquired; to master the language for formal and professional purposes; to improve strategic speaking, reading, and writing skills; to examine and recognize regional, social, and contextual variations; and to enhance your understanding and appreciation of Hispanic and Latinx cultures and sociopolitical realities. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Four credit hours. U.
SP127fs    Intermediate Spanish I The third of three consecutive courses designed to develop fluency and accuracy in the Spanish language. Through an intensive grammar review, students develop skills for independent and creative interactive communication. Designed to refine students' major skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to provide insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Video screenings and short readings in Hispanic literature and culture deepen student understanding of linguistic and cultural nuances and serve as the basis for in-class discussions and writing assignments. Prerequisite: Spanish 126. Four credit hours. Faculty
SP127Hf    Spanish Language for Heritage Learners Designed for students who come from a variety of Spanish speaking family backgrounds and have some knowledge of Spanish. The purpose of this course is to revitalize and gain confidence in the Spanish you have acquired; to master the language for formal and professional purposes; to improve strategic speaking, reading, and writing skills; to examine and recognize regional, social, and contextual variations; and to enhance your understanding and appreciation of Hispanic and Latinx cultures and sociopolitical realities. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Four credit hours. U. Bernal Heredia
SP127Jj    Intermediate Spanish in Salamanca

This course is the third semester of the Spanish language sequence and takes place in Salamanca, Spain. Immersing themselves in day-to-day Spanish life by living with local families, students will take part in activities in the city, and explore other historic sites in Spain. Students will refine speaking, listening, reading and writing skills for realistic and culturally appropriate communication in the target language, and will be expected to speak only in Spanish during their stay in order to strengthen their language production and to increase cultural competency through a communicative, task-based approach. Estimated cost: $3000. Prerequisite: Spanish 126. Three credit hours. White

SP128fs    Conversation, Composition, and Culture Designed specifically to develop oral skills and critical thinking in Spanish, with additional practice in writing and continued work in vocabulary building and grammar review. This course fosters communication skills through conversation, composition, and analysis of cultural production from the Hispanic and Latinx worlds. Working with a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts and cultural products, students will acquire the skills to critique and interpret while engaging in active thinking. Prerequisite: Spanish 127. Four credit hours. Millones, White
SP128Hs    Spanish Composition for Heritage Learners Designed specifically to develop biliteracy skills in heritage learners of Spanish. Students will work in vocabulary building and academic writing literacy through the analysis of different cultural production. This course fosters understand of bilingualism and bilingual contact phenomena, examines and recognizes regional, social, and contextual variations, empower students by reflecting on their own language experiences and practices and builds community by making connections with students of similar backgrounds and life experiences. Prerequisite: Spanish 127H. Four credit hours. U. Mayans
[SP132]    Conversation and Composition in Salamanca This course takes place in Salamanca, which was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1988. Students immerse themselves in day-to-day Spanish life by living with local families, taking part in activities inside the city, and exploring other historic sites in Spain. This course develops communicative and argumentative writing skills in Spanish through conversations with peers and locals and by analyzing a variety of texts and events. Students may not receive credit for this course and SP131. Estimated cost for Jan Plan 2020: $3200. Prerequisite: Spanish 128. Three credit hours. I.
[SP135]    Introduction to Literary Analysis Four credit hours. L.
[SP135A]    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Eco-Fiction and Eco-Thought Introduction to critical analysis through a variety of eco-fiction and eco-thought provoking readings from Latin American, Spanish, and/or U.S. Latinx authors. We will explore human accountability to the environment and the presence of nonhuman beings in fiction. Students will learn how to examine cultural products such as literature, film, performance, and visual culture through close reading, thematic analysis, and strategies of interpretation. Students develop skills in writing critical essays and learn the basics of scholarly research. Prerequisite: Spanish 128 or 132. Four credit hours. L.
SP135Bs    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Indigeneous Latin America Latin America is home to more than 45 million Indigenous peoples who, given historical legacies of colonialism, have had little voice in regional and national discourses despite their numbers. Though Indigenous peoples and their cultures have long attracted the attention of non-Indigenous authors and artists, the canon features very few (if any) Indigenous voices. This course studies Latin American and LatinX Indigeneities vis-Ư-vis cultural, literary, and film studies. Students will learn how to examine cultural products through close reading, thematic analysis, and strategies of interpretation, developing skills in writing critical essays and learning the basics of scholarly research. Prerequisite: Spanish 128. Four credit hours. L. Miller
[SP135C]    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Love and Death Eros and Thanatos go hand in hand in literary creation. Eros is responsible for sexual attraction, love, and sex and is also worshiped as the god of fertility and creativity. Thanatos has been postulated as the drive to a non-violent death. Both impulses pervade some of the best literature in Spanish. In this course we will examine a number of texts by Spanish and Latin American authors which best illustrate this dynamic, through close reading, thematic analysis and strategies of interpretation. Students will develop skills in writing critical essays while also learning the basics of scholarly research. Prerequisite: Spanish 128 or 132. Four credit hours. L.
[SP135D]    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Visibility and Mobility Considers how cultural production can provide avenues to give voice to those with less power, including racial minorities, women, and LGBTQ artists. Our examination of these works will consider how forms of Hispanic cultural production constitute a means for gaining visibility and mobility for underrepresented groups. Students will learn how to examine cultural production through close-reading, thematic analysis, and strategies of interpretation across multiple literary genres as well as visual forms of cultural production. Students will also develop skills in writing critical essays while learning the basics of scholarly research. Prerequisite: Spanish 128 or 132. Four credit hours. L.
SP135Ef    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Spanish in the USA Explores the experiences of U.S. Latinx communities through sociopolitical, historical and linguistic phenomena. We will cover major and minor demographic varieties of Spanish in the USA, bilingualism, and contact situation, among other topics. Students will learn how to examine linguistic and cultural phenomena through close reading, thematic analysis, and strategies of interpretation, developing skills in writing critical essays and learning the basics of scholarly research. Prerequisite: Spanish 128. Four credit hours. L. Mayans
[SP135F]    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Jews of Medieval Iberia During the Middle Ages, in the Iberian Peninsula, Jews often excelled in all forms of cultural expressions. This course explores the works of the Sephardic Jews in their historical context, from their establishment in the Peninsula until their expulsion from the Iberian kingdoms, their cryptic survival, and eventual spread throughout the world. Students will learn how to examine cultural production through close reading, thematic analysis, and strategies of interpretation. Students will also develop skills in writing critical essays and learning the basics of scholarly research. Prerequisite: Spanish 128 or 132. Four credit hours. L.
[SP135G]    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Autobiography in Colonial Latin America Autobiographical writing is retrospective prose narrative composed by a real person concerning personal existence, where the focus is the individual life, in particular the story of a personality. Multifaceted and complex expressions of power, gender and racial identity in autobiographies, including works by "discoverers" of the New World and a transgender nun, will be considered. Students will learn how to examine cultural production through close-reading, thematic analysis, and strategies of interpretation. Students will also develop skills in writing critical essays and learning the basics of scholarly research. Prerequisite: Spanish 128 or 132. Four credit hours. L.
SP135Hf    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Rap en espanol Explores Latin American hip-hop in relation to identity, poetics, and urban space. The work of artists from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Argentina, and the United States will be paired with secondary readings from Critical Race Theory. We will also practice ethnographic methods, including interviews. Students will learn how to examine cultural production through close-reading, thematic analysis, and strategies of interpretation. Students will also develop skills in writing critical essays and learning the basics of scholarly research. Critical Race Collaborative course. Prerequisite: Spanish 128. Four credit hours. L. Hankin
SP135Is    Introduction to Critical Analysis: Indigeneities in ContemporaryPopular Culture in the Americas This interdisciplinary course explores the construction of contemporary urban indigenous identities through an analysis of a wide range of cultural mediums (popular music, audiovisual arts, graphic memory, performance, comics, video games, aesthetics, among others) to analyze emerging patterns of cultural variegations, affective energies, and decolonized daily practices. Geographically, students will examine artistic productions from urban indigenous peoples in the Americas, focusing on indigenous and mestizo Latin America (Abya Yala) and Native American and Indigenous cultures in the United States (Turtle Island). Global Lab course Prerequisite: Spanish 128 or 132. Four credit hours. L. Bernal Heredia
SP197f    Baila in the Community Uses the power of the arts and culture to foster a sense of belonging and engage the public in community building. In this course, students will learn about the social dynamics and cultural contexts of Latin dance genres as well as fundamental dance patterns, and rhythms which then students will use to teach and create dance routines in collaboration with community members. Nongraded. One credit hour. Bernal Heredia
SP231fs    Advanced Spanish An in-depth analysis of Spanish grammar, focusing on the more complex and subtle linguistic and cultural dimensions of a variety of syntactical and lexical concepts. Students will achieve an advanced mastery of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Spanish 128. Four credit hours. Bollo-Panadero
[SP234]    Diversity and Racism in Contemporary Spain Focuses on the cultures and communities that make up contemporary Spain, with particular emphasis on the modern waves of immigration that have radically changed the country. Covering the latter years of the dictatorship and into the democracy (from 1970 forward), we examine how regionalism, multiculturalism, and diversity have been represented across a range of media and literature in Spain. Topics may include Latin American, African and Asian migration and diasporas, sex and sexuality, racial politics, and linguistic and cultural difference in Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. I.
SP236f    Medical Spanish: Health and Illness in Spain Through a broad approach that encompasses the study of literature, film, medical journals, and real-life contexts, this course analyzes how medical institutions govern life, death, bodies, and minds. Students will analyze medical articles, public health policies, and responses to major pandemics and illnesses in the Spanish-speaking world, and in so doing will hone language skills that are useful for the medical profession. Topics may include cross-cultural pandemics and epidemics, narrative medicine in medical practices, cultural differences regarding illness and health, and the situational use of professional medical vocabulary in Spanish. Fulfills Spanish H/E requirement. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. Allbritton
[SP237]    Conquest and Resistance in the Americas The European expansion during the Early Modern period sought to transform the Americas by reproducing the material, spiritual, and biological landscapes of the Old World. Amerindian peoples whose lives and cultures were jeopardized confronted the Europeans deploying an array of resistance strategies. Students will engage with texts and materials from different areas and time periods to uncover and analyze the many ways in which energy and exhaustion came into play during conquest and resistance efforts across the Americas. This Environmental Humanities class explores the Energy/Exhaustion humanities theme. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. L, I.
SP239s    Latin America at the Movies An introduction to the cinematography of Latin America covering a broad set of topics, countries and time periods. Students will explore how diverse themes-revolution, modernity, gender, race, labor, and neoliberalism-inform national history, particularly in Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Cuba, nations that developed an energetic cinematography at various points in the 20th century. Students will gain experience in film analysis and how to articulate the relationship between content and artistic form. Fulfills Spanish G/S requirement. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. A. Almeyda-Cohen
[SP244]    Bad Women and B-Films in Contemporary Latin America Explores the rich heritage of Latin American exploitation cinema (B-films) that transcends national borders and cultural differences. By watching a diversity of "low-brow" film genres and reading feminist and critical film theory, students will interrogate notions of acceptability, the popular, high art, and industry machinery. In particular, we will focus on how cinematic depictions of "bad" women open possibilities for gendered identities which disrupt conventional models of women's roles in Latin America. Students will gain experience in film analysis and how to articulate the relationship between content and artistic form. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. A.
SP246f    Latin American Theatre Introduces a range of 20th-century Latin American theatrical texts to consider thematic and aesthetic components related to issues such as nation-building, violence, language, identity, gender, sexuality, immigration, and memory. Discussions will engage these questions: How is theater related to social and political change? What is the role of the spectator in the transformations presented in these works? And how is Latin American theater changing in the 21st century? Central to our discussions will be the influence of theorists such as Brecht, Artaud, and Beckett on Latin American playwrights. Fulfills Spanish C/I requirement. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. A, I. White
[SP254]    Aqui estamos: U.S. Latinx in the 20th and 21st Centuries Will examine the cultural productions and critical discourse surrounding U.S. Latinx subjects in the second half of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st. Students will examine issues of migration and identity in the U.S. context beginning in the 1950s along with political realities of Latin America and the Caribbean to expand ideas of Latinidad. Students will explore identity formation and negotiations of language, race, gender, sexuality, class, coloniality, and diaspora to reveal the present U.S. Latinx reality. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. L, U.
[SP266]    Language of Spanish Cinema An examination of selected works by major Spanish directors of the 20th and 21st centuries. Introduces students to the discipline of film studies and investigates cinematic representations of Spain during the dictatorship and the subsequent transition to democracy. Special attention to questions of identity, violence, and instances of resistance. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. A, I.
SP298s    Language Justice in the Spanish Speaking World Considers how language, ideology, and power provide an understanding of the dynamics of Spanish language and power in Latin America and the US. We study a range of linguistic articles on language oppression, resistance, and raciolinguistics to question existing social hierarchies while extending the classroom to embedded experiences with global and local partners. Through a broad approach that pairs linguistic research with music, film, media, and civic engagement opportunities, we see how language practice reflects common sociopolitical issues in the production of knowledge, culture, and identities. Fulfills Spanish C/I requirement. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. Mayans
[SP2XX]    Race and Identity in Contemporary Latin America Through a range of visual and literary media, this course analyzes the complexities of race and identity in contemporary Latin American culture. Students will critically assess how geography and land contribute to issues of inequality and power, particularly as it applies to Indigenous and African communities in Latin America. Particular attention will be paid to racial disparities, Afro-Latin American cultures and diasporic connections, and discourses of privilege and power. Four credit hours.
[SP343]    Indigenous Textualities, Decoloniality, and Land Sovereignty Students will learn about Indigenous understandings of disseminating knowledge in Abiayala (Latin America) as they give back to LatinX migrant students in Maine. Through this civic engagement, students will explore non-Western Indigenous forms of knowledge and issues surrounding migration to the United States from Mexico and Central America while analyzing contemporary issues surrounding LatinX diasporas, land sovereignty, and Critical Indigenous Studies. Topics may include trans-indigeneity, alternative forms of "writing," oraliterature, digital humanities, hybridity, modernity, decoloniality, and ecocriticism. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literaure, culture, or film course. Four credit hours.
SP344s    Environmental Knowledge, Imperialism, and Resistance European expansion during the Early Modern period sought to transform the Americas by reproducing the material, spiritual, and biological landscapes of the Old World. Amerindian peoples whose lives, cultures, and environments were jeopardized confronted the European actions and ideas by deploying an array of resistance strategies. We study this process to understand the confrontations surrounding environmental knowledge, imperialism, and resistance in our postcolonial reality. Students will engage with texts, images, and other materials from different areas and time periods to learn theories and to develop a critical perspective on the history of the encounter of cultures. Fulfills Spanish H/E requirement. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. I. Millones
[SP345]    Black Lives Matter in the Hispanic World Africans and Afro-descendants formed a part of the Hispanic world dating from before the arrival of the first slaves to North America in 1619, but the existence of Black peoples has not been fully recognized. Literary and historical analysis will explore the various ways Africans and their descendants have always been cultural citizens of Spain and Spanish America through auto/biographies, archival documents, slave narratives and contemporary prose. Continuities between racial discourses in the past and the present, and Black agency throughout time, demonstrate the various ways Black life has always mattered even when it has gone unnoticed. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours.
[SP346]    Race, Rights, and Land in the Americas Examines issues of race, rights, and land for subaltern subjects across the Americas. By focusing on Afro-diasporic peoples, students will better understand how systematic issues of race and the disenfranchisement of black bodies are not isolated to any one area, but a product of the legacy of slavery. We will explore how these issues are ever-present for Black subjects in the Americas through various examples from Brazil, Central America, the U.S. and Maine. By examining archival materials and artistic works, students take part in a range of projects that show the multifaceted nature of land rights for the Afro-Americas. Boundaries and Margins humanities lab. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. I.
SP347f    LatinX Indigeneities and Mesoamerican Borders Through a broad approach that encompasses the study of literature, film, real-life contexts, and other media, this course analyzes how borders, migration, and Indigeneity have been conceptualized. Students will hone their language skills as they situate these topics within the field of LatinX studies to critically analyze the longer historical trajectory of socio-political and cultural movement in Mesoamerica: Central America, Mexico, and the United States. In addition to geo-political borders, topics will conceptualize borders in their abstract sense, exploring interconnected topics such as gender, sexuality, ethnicity, race, and class. Fulfills Spanish C/I or G/S requirements. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. Miller
[SP348]    The Afro-Americas: Race, Power, and Subjectivity Explores literature, film, and cultural productions by Afro-descendant subjects in the Americas. Focusing on Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Afro-Latinx populations, this course underscores the interconnected nature of Afro-descendant populations in the region and examines how Afro-descendant populations constantly negotiate hegemonic cultural norms overtly and subversively. Using an intersectional approach, students will explore who is included and excluded in a national rhetoric, how race is constructed or rejected, who speaks or does not speak in history, and how gender is negotiated or silenced in national narratives. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. L, I.
[SP356]    Representations of Blackness in Early Modern Spain Framing this course squarely in the long but often obscured history of slavery in early modern Spain, we will examine and interrogate cultural expressions of race in sixteenth and seventeenth century Spanish cultural production, including literature, theater, visual art, music, and archival documents. More specifically, we will consider how these images and expressions, and voices present different responses, both affirming and contesting, to early modern anxieties about race, gender, religion, social class, and national identity. Boundaries and Margins humanities theme course. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. L, I.
SP357f    Borderlands Cinema: Latinx Media Representations 20th and 21st Century Explores the cinematic representations of the Latinx experience of the B/borderlands over five distinct periods: silent cinema (1900s…1920s), sound cinema (1930s¡1960s), social problem films (1930sÅ1950s), New Latinx cinema (1970s), mainstream televisual cinema (1980sČ1990s), and cinema in the digital age (2000sĹpresent). Students will explore how diverse themesŬgender, race, and laborƄinform film studies, particularly on the US/Mexico border and the borderlands of New York City. Students will gain experience in film analysis and how to articulate the relationship between content and artistic form. Fulfills Spanish C/I or G/S requirements. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. A, U. Almeyda-Cohen
[SP362]    All about Almodóvar The study of contemporary Spanish history and film through the works of noted filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar. Analyzes the films of Almodóvar as representative of the changes in Spanish culture from the 1980s to the present day. Topics may include sex and sexuality, film genres and film history, and modern Spanish political and cultural life. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. A, I.
[SP366]    Queer Spain The representation of queer lives and identities in recent Spanish history. We will engage with Spanish film, literature, and culture to consider and question the 'origins' of LGBTQ identity in Spain. Have we always imagined queerness as a coupling of people or movements to signify alterity and difference? Who gets to tell the story of queer lives in Spain, and whether such histories form a string of texts that resist silence and fear? Is Spanish queerness related to a transnational sense of queer identity? Thinking of queerness as a spectrum allows us to challenge the borders of sex and gender both within Spain and within our own cultures. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours.
[SP371]    The Colonial Experience: European and Amerindian Responses Close readings of representative primary documents and iconography from throughout the Spanish and Portuguese empires that were produced to report, understand, legislate, and record various dimensions of the encounter between Europe and the New World during the 16th and 17th centuries. Emphasizes efforts by Europeans and Amerindians to control the memory of events and to position themselves in colonial societies. Students will explore texts and cultural productions used to exert dominance or resistance during a specific historical context, become critical readers of primary documents, and engage with key issues of colonial literature. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. L.
[SP376]    Narratives, Artifacts, and Monuments of Pre-Columbian Civilization Studies narratives of pre-Columbian civilizations as transmitted by oral tradition or by drawings, painted codices, pottery, architecture, textiles, etc., and how all these cultural products were read and refashioned under colonial rule. Students develop skills in analytical reading of cultural productions as diverse expressions of power, identity, religion, race, and hybridity. Promotes a sophisticated understanding of the types of primary sources and methodological approaches that scholars use to reconstruct the world of pre-Columbian societies. Prerequisite: A 200-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. L.
SP398s    Sex in the Colonies This course explores the relationship between gender, sexuality, and power in the Hispanic colonies, and considers the way these dynamics played out in the representation of colonized women and men. Through images, literary works, letters, and legal documents, we will examine how authorities used gender and sexuality to create and maintain colonial hierarchy as well as how colonial people used those same characteristics to challenge their roles in society. We will also consider how we continue to use gender and sexuality as a way to structure and subvert societal norms. Fulfills Spanish G/S requirement. Prerequisite: Spanish 135. Four credit hours. Raboso Manas
SP483f, 484s    Senior Honors Thesis The senior honors thesis can replace the senior seminar requirement. The thesis, which will be written in Spanish, is to be a substantial study of a carefully defined literary topic supported by critical sources. Prerequisite: A 3.7 or higher major average and an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher at the end of the junior year and permission of the department. Two to four credit hours. Faculty
SP483Jj    Senior Honors Thesis Noncredit. Allbritton
SP491f, 492s    Independent Study Individual projects in areas where the student has demonstrated the interest and competence necessary for independent work. Cannot substitute for formal course work toward the major. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair. Two to four credit hours. Faculty
SP498s    Convergence/Divergence in Medieval Iberian Cultures Focuses on the intellectual production of Medieval Iberia in periods of societal and cultural unity and conflict. We will analyze the ways in which different narratives functioned in society, understanding them as reflections of social and historical concerns. Topics covered include: interactions of Jews, Christians, and Muslims; gender and sexuality; multilingualism; cultural identity; and national-building strategies. This class will be conducted in Spanish. Texts in other languages will be read in translation. Prerequisite: Senior standing and a 300-level Spanish literature, culture, or film course. Four credit hours. L, I. Bollo-Panadero