Global Labs

Spring 2020 History
HI120E  Spotlight on History: World Revolutions   
Four credit hours.  Parker, L.

World revolutions in the 20th century transmitted the energy of ideological fervor, violent iconoclasm and radical justice beyond the bounds of Europe. The great socialist revolutions in Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America can be viewed as the diffusion through ideological and artistic forms of a utopian tradition that sought to change the world by reinterpreting it. Revolutionary activism was made accessible to the masses as visual art, political pamphlet, literary narrative, film and slogan. This process-oriented, archive and object-centered course foregrounds research with these primary sources, enabling student engagement with methodological questions of how we understand, historicize, and curate revolution as a global phenomenon.

 

Spring 2018 Art History
AR458  American Art in a Global Context
Four credit hours.  U.  Sheehan

What does it mean to study American art in a global context? This question has reframed the field of American art history in the 21st century, stimulating studies of artists abroad, (inter)national styles and subject matter, and the global construction, circulation, and interpretation of images. In this global lab, students have a unique opportunity to witness and contribute to this scholarly shift at three sites: the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Colby College Museum of Art. At each site, students will meet with curators and conduct original research that will inform oral presentations and writing assignments.

Spring 2018 Government
GO357  Political Economy of Regionalism   

Four credit hours.  Hatch

Comparative analysis of economic and political integration in three regions: Europe (the EU), North America (NAFTA), and Asia. Why do states agree to give up some sovereignty by cooperating on regional projects? Why do these projects vary so much from region to region? As part of this Global Lab, students learn how to use GIS software to build maps documenting the demographic and economic processes of regionalization in three areas of the world.

 

Fall 2017 Global Studies
GS497  Insurgent Mobilities Lab I: Migrants, Activists, the Balkan Route  
Four credit hours.  S, I.  El-Shaarawi

The dynamics of global migration–specifically, the tension between state and regional efforts to control migration and the efforts of migrants and activists to advocate for open borders and freedom of movement. Students join instructor’s research team for an ongoing multi-sited project on the Balkan route that hundreds of thousands have traveled to seek a better life in Northern Europe. Students learn about the causes and consequences of the European migrant crisis and the ways that migrants and activists worked together to build the Balkan route despite restrictive European policies. Involves reading the latest research, analyzing primary data, and creating original research products. Fulfills anthropology’s culture area requirement.

Spring 2018 Global Studies
GS498  Insurgent Mobilities Lab II: Migrants, Activists, the Balkan Route  

Four credit hours.  I.  Razsa

The dynamics of global migration–specifically, the tension between state and regional efforts to control migration and the efforts of migrants and activists to advocate for open borders and freedom of movement. Students join instructor’s research team for an ongoing multi-sited project on the Balkan route that hundreds of thousands have traveled to seek a better life in Northern Europe. Students learn about the causes and consequences of the European migrant crisis and the ways that migrants and activists worked together to build the Balkan route despite restrictive European policies. Fulfills anthropology’s culture area requirement. A continuation of Insurgent Mobilities Lab I, but students need not have taken I to enroll in II.

 

 

Global Innovation Course

Spring 2020 Religious Studies
RE346  Jews of Germany, Past and Present   
Four credit hours.  Freidenreich

Examines Jewish life in Germany from the Middle Ages to the present, with particular attention to modernity, the Holocaust, and its aftermath. Explores the impact of German culture on Jewishness and the roles of Jews in conceptions of Germanness. Students will engage in traditional and experiential learning and will develop independent research, writing, and oral communications skills. Includes an optional spring break trip to Germany subsidized by DavisConnects.

Spring 2020 Religious Studies
RE144  Introduction to the New Testament   

Four credit hours.  Emanuel

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the field of New Testament and Christian Origins. Students will learn about the construction of New Testament texts, early Jesus followers, and the origins of Christianity through a survey of New Testament writings and other Jewish/Christian/Jesus-centered documents. No prior knowledge is required. Note: This course is supported by Davis Connects. Students registered for this course have the opportunity to travel to Israel for an archaeological dig in summer 2019.

 

January 2020 Global Studies
GS245J  Memory and Politics   
Three credit hours.  Yoder

This off-campus course invites students to consider how governments and other actors frame the past, for what purposes, and with what effects. The focus is on post-1945 Europe, with special attention to Austria. Through a variety of writing exercises, students will engage with social science and Austria-specific debates about whether and how a society should address its past, particularly after periods of violence and authoritarian or totalitarian rule. This JanPLan in Salzburg, Austria features excursions, including to Vienna.

January 2020 Government
GO297  Writers against the State: Reading the Political Novel in Prague  
Three credit hours.  Babik

Reveals the role of literature as a form of political protest in a city with a rich tradition of writers against the state: Prague, Czech Republic. Students will read, discuss, and write about major Czech literary artists such as Milan Kundera and Vaclav Havel, the dissident playwright who led the 1989 Velvet Revolution against communism. Classes will be combined with excursions to local sites relevant to the course material, such as the Vaclav Havel Library, Café Slavia, and Pankrac Prison.

 

Fall 2019 Jewish Studies
JS 125  Hebrew I  
Three credit hours.  Isaacs

The first of three consecutive courses designed to develop fluency and accuracy in Modern Hebrew. Through an interactive approach to language learning, students gain communicative proficiency and a greater understanding of Israeli society. Videos, audio, and web materials introduce students to the nuanced and rich connections between Hebrew and Jewish culture in Israel and around the world. December 2019 immersion trip to Israel.

 

JanPlan 2018 Government
GO338  Field Study in African Development   

Three credit hours.  Seay

Students will spend approximately three weeks of this global innovation course in Uganda comparing international, local, and diaspora-driven approaches to economic and social development. Through discussions with local, international, and development practitioners, observation of development projects, a rural home stay, and meetings with local and international policymakers, students will learn to identify, compare, and contrast varying theoretical and practical approaches to development in Africa, assess the effectiveness of international, diaspora-driven, and local approaches to development and its promotion in Uganda.