STUDENT RESOURCES


Colby students are known for their intellectual curiosity and creativity. This page highlights numerous on-campus funding resources, as well as grant-driven funding opportunities for students interested in research or internship experiences.

For questions regarding general internship or research funding, please contact [email protected].

For questions regarding Watson Fellowships and Davis Projects for Peace, please contact [email protected].


RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH INTERACTIVE TUTORIALS


If you are working in a National Science Foundation (NSF) supported laboratory during the academic year, you will need to register and complete the ethics training modules in order to comply with the NSF Implementation of Section 7009 of the America COMPETES Act (click for full announcement), which are federal guidelines established that require institutions to present a plan for “appropriate training and oversight in the responsible and ethical conduct of research.”

In addition to the federal rules for NSF labs, some courses at Colby may require you to complete ethics trainings for full credit.

Colby College has devised a campus-wide plan for ethics training to comply with this mandate. The sponsor of the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) modules is CITI.

Click here to register for a CITI account, and click the Register button. For additional guidance through the CITI registration process, you can access the Guide to Getting Started.

In step 1 of the registration process, select Colby College as your organization.

In step 5, indicate that you are not interested in receiving Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits.

In step 6, select Student Researcher – Undergraduate as your Role in Research completing these modules. You can decline to take all of the other, optional courses.

Once you have created your CITI account, please complete the Responsible Conduct of Research module first. Your CITI account will track your progress through this module, so you don’t need to complete it all in one sitting.

Once you have completed the course, return to the Main Menu, and follow the link to View Previously Completed Coursework. For this page, you can download or print your Completion Report.

For questions, contact Seven Grenier, x4341, [email protected] in the Office of Sponsored Programs, or email [email protected].


DAVIS PROJECTS FOR PEACE


HOW WOULD YOU USE $10,000 TO BUILD PEACE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD?

Application Entry Deadline: Tuesday, November 16, 2021


Send us your two-page project proposal and one page budget to [email protected].

The projects judged to be the most promising will be funded at $10,000 each.

Playgrounds for Peace

Zimbabwe headed to the polls today for its very first vote since long-serving ruler Robert Mugabe was ousted from power. Elections in #Zimbabwe can be violent, and today’s #Mulemondays feature Kieran Dunn ’20, who was born and raised in Zimbabwe, is using a @Davis Projects for Peace grant he was awarded to build playgrounds in two impoverished communities in the county to foster peaceful community while promoting social and emotional well-being.

Posted by Colby College on Monday, July 30, 2018


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GUIDELINES

To be considered, a student (or group of students) must prepare a written statement that describes the project (who, what, where, how) including expected outcomes and prospects for future impact. The written statement should be two-pages (11-point type or larger) and a budget should not be more than one page.

If you have any questions please contact Seven Grenier in the Grants office at [email protected] or tel: 207-859-4341.

Please do not directly contact the Project for Peace Program at the Davis United World Scholars Program office.

For more information on the Projects for Peace initiative, please visit the Colby Grants Projects for Peace website or the Davis Projects for Peace website.

PROJECTS FOR PEACE AWARD 2021

Many thanks to all Colby students who designed and developed fabulous Projects for Peace this year!

We are very pleased to announce that the Davis Projects for Peace Initiative selected the following two Colby student projects, “Art for Peace” and “Mentor Mentee Program”, to receive 2021 Projects for Peace funding.


In Haiti, Keerthi Martyn ’22 has a two-fold project that will connect students from the school of social work with local artists through a one-day art symposium for peace and advocacy. It is meant to not only showcase the artists’ works, but also include lectures and talks about the inherent connection between art, peace, social work, and social justice. He will then work with Haitian artists and the schools’ faculty to develop art-related courses to add to the school’s offerings: one on social action through art for peace and another on art therapy for emotional healing and PTSD.

“The goal is not just putting one singular solution, one symposium for one day, but also building that sustainability factor, which I think is the most important part of any project for peace.” — Keerthi Martyn, Colby College ’22


Naoki Kihata ’22 and Jordyn Kim ’22 will travel to South Korea for their project which aims to establish a mentorship program between elementary school students and college students from Yonsei University. Modeled after Colby’s successful CCAK program, it is intended to facilitate an intergenerational exchange that would produce a crucial benefit: improved mental health among South Korean students. They hope their Project for Peace program serves as an example of how looking up to someone can really change one’s outlook on life.

“We hope that these college students who are academically driven and involved in the community are able to serve as role models.” — Naoki Kihata, Colby College ’22


LEARN MORE


ACADEMICS AND NEW VENTURES


 

 

 

Educational exploration is a way of life at Colby.


ACADEMIC RESOURCES


 

 

 

Career planning is an integral part of the Colby experience.


DAVISCONNECTS


 

 

 

Colby supports entrepreneurial curiosity.


ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION


INTERNSHIP SPOTLIGHT

SUMMER RESEARCH AT CERN: HANNAH BOSSI ’18


 

Hannah Bossi ’18 at ALICE at CERN, the worlds largest particle physics laboratory

Hannah Bossi ’18 spent the summer of 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland, at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, the world’s largest particle physics laboratory.

Hannah participated in a summer student program in A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE), where, under the supervision of Markus Fasel, she studied neutral Kaons (K0_s) through their decays into neutral pions and reconstructing this in ALICE through the Kaons’ decay into two photons. To do this, Hannah analyzed data from pp collisions at 8 TeV energy in the center of mass.

In an article published by ALICE, Hannah is quoted saying, “When I decided to apply to this program, I was very excited about the opportunity to go to CERN and meet people of my age coming from so many different places and cultures…I also wanted to explore particle physics more and get some hands-on experience.”

Hannah, a Physics major at Colby and co-President of the Colby Outing Club and a Colby Outdoor Orientation Trips (COOT) Leader, is currently pursuing a graduate program in Physics at Yale University.


MORE INTERNSHIP SPOTLIGHTS


ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL INTERNSHIPS


 

Since 2012, the Elfrieda Frank Foundation has been working with Colby’s Office of Grant and Sponsored Program to sponsor research experiences at archaeological field schools in the Americas.

The Elfrieda Frank Foundation’s grants have created summer experiences for students to participate in research projects and field work of archaeological significance. The students who received funding have expanded their perspectives of archaeology, improved their skills and understandings of field work and research, and more deeply explored their interests in archaeology for future endeavors.


Lola Collins ’20 received an Elfrieda Frank Foundation scholarship to attend a field school in Oaxaca, Mexico, in 2017.

My name is Lola Collins, and through the Elfreida Frank Foundation Scholarship I was able to go to Oaxaca, Mexico, to attend an ethno-historical field school.

 

The main goal was to explore the effects of colonialism in Oaxaca, which is coastal and was a main point of contact for colonizers coming to Mexico. I spent time in Oaxaca City and the surrounding areas, exploring ruins and other archaeological sites, giving me insight into early Mexican civilizations, such as the Zapotec and Mixtec. I then made my way down the coast of Oaxaca to a city called Huatulco, an important entry point for pirates and colonizers alike. From there I went on to do the thick of the program’s fieldwork in a small, Chontal-speaking village called San Pedro Huamelula. We were there to document an important summer festival that was dedicated to the patron saint of the village, San Pedro. There I got to see how indigenous and colonial cultures mix to inform current practices of religion and Chontal life.

 

From this field school, I learned how I wanted to continue to practice anthropology, which was also important in informing my anthropological career at Colby.

Lola will be studying Art History and Anthropology at University College London for the 2018-19 academic year. After Colby, Lola intends to go to graduate school to become an urban designer/planner.

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APPLICATION

Application Process:
Please email all application materials under the subject heading “Archaeological Grant Application” to Catherine Besteman, Francis F. Bartlett and Ruth K. Bartlett Professor of Anthropology, at [email protected].

Application Deadline: February 2019

Application materials include:

  1. A Statement of Interest;

  2. Undated resume or curriculum vitae and informal academic transcript;

  3. Web link to specific field school program with deadline and starting / end dates of the program;

  4. Budget including tuition, travel and housing expenses, and number of weeks of enrollment;

  5. Letter of Recommendation from Colby faculty member (sent separately by the recommender).

Note: By applying for and accepting (if offered) an Elfrieda Frank Field School Summer Grant, you agree to make a short public presentation about your experience when you return to campus and to write a short report that will be made available to the Foundation.

Please contact the Office of Grants and Sponsored Programs if you have questions at [email protected].


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INTERNSHIP AND RESEARCH EXPERIENCES


FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS

As a Colby student you are presented with diverse opportunities for undergraduate and post graduate experiences that can be enriching and challenging. Those who have excelled academically and professionally are strongly encouraged to learn more about fellowship and scholarship opportunities.

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS


RESEARCH

Grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other sources have expanded opportunities for students to learn by doing—in laboratories, in classrooms, in the field, and on stage.

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AT COLBY

COLBY LIBERAL ARTS SYMPOSIUM (CLAS)

APPLICATION TO FUND STUDENTS’ SPECIAL PROJECTS (WORD DOCUMENT)


INTERNSHIP FUNDING

Experiential learning is critical for today’s college students. Internship funding offers Colby students an opportunity to learn skill sets and competencies outside the classroom. Many Colby students take advantage of internship opportunities during Jan Plan, the academic year, and the summer months. Internship funding supports students’ experiential learning, offering financial assistance for unpaid placements throughout the world. Financial assistance awards money for students’ living expenses, including transportation, food, and housing.

Colby College supports students’ professional development by providing funds to enable students to accept internships and conduct research and have some of their expenses, such as travel and housing, reimbursed. As a result, many students have been able to travel and complete internships that they would not otherwise be able to accept. The college appreciates the generosity of donors who have created the endowed funds that make this possible. In a typical year, over $100,000 is generated in income from these funds to support student internships.

Students may apply for funding through various on-campus offices. Each office manages its own program and application process. All recipients of funding should expect to write a report at the conclusion of their internship.

COLBY FUNDING FOR INTERNSHIPS, RESEARCH, AND FIELD SCHOOLS