2010 Newsmakers

Josephine Liang '14

Maddie Purcell ’12 was named the U.S. Small Business Administration’s 2020 Young Entrepreneur of the Year for Maine. Purcell is the owner of Fyood Kitchen, which provides ingredients and equipment for participants who create recipes in team competitions. She was recognized for her creative efforts to continue to operate during the pandemic. * Brett Ewer ’14, head of CrossFit’s government relations department, was quoted in a Wall Street Journal story about gym owners taking on the role of Washington lobbyists. Ewer started “a group (the Community Gyms Coalition) with other fitness brands to push for federal support for small gyms and fitness studios.” * Josephine Liang ’14 was selected for Forbes’ 30 under 30 Europe 2021 list as a featured honoree in the Social Impact category. Liang, who works in London, cofounded Dare to Care Packages, which packs and distributes weekly care packages for people not on the national support list during the pandemic. * Dustin Satloff ’15 received a $5,000 prize and mentorship from the Doug Pensinger Photography Fund, which “supports emerging sports photographers by creating a community that develops and advances their skill and vision.” Satloff began his photography career with Colby’s Athletics Department. Since then, his assignments have included serving as on-course venue photo supervisor at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. 


2019

Class Correspondent:

Amy LoTemplio
[email protected]
Hello, Colby friends! While the year following 2019 has brought much uncertainty, grief, and hardship, you’ll be happy to know that your fellow classmates have remained resilient, making the most of their unique situations. I hope that reading their life updates brings you some happiness! Here goes: Iain Kurry has been doing a lot of good camping and fishing in Maine with former track teammates Scott Harrison, Nathan Madeira ’17, Chase Brown ’16, and Tyler Lewtan ’17. * Elizabeth Holland, Margaret Yoder, Sophie Stokes Cerkvenik, and Isabel Berzansky all happily live, work, and play together in Brookline, Mass. They’re hoping to add a dachshund to their small family soon. * Emily Dunn is in her second year at NYU School of Law and living in NYC. She regularly sees Emily Dolan, Flora Tipton, and Sophie Kaplan. They’ve been searching out new outdoor dining and other socially distanced activities. * Tanner Holifield currently lives and works in Bethesda, Md., as a software developer for a government contractor. He celebrated his one-year work anniversary in January. He’s also an assistant varsity high school lacrosse coach (starting last year and hopefully continuing this spring). * Duncan Cole was briefly mentioned in the Science Magazine article “To Save This Palm-Filled Paradise, Biologists Must Kill the Trees.” The article detailed some of the work he was doing right before Covid. Since then, he’s spent a few months working as an observer on a commercial fishing vessel in Alaska. * Cam Brooks-Miller, Emily Goulette, and Carolyn Jones live together in Portland, Maine, with seven cats, four dogs, and a horse. * Merrill Read also lives in Portland and works as an environmental scientist with the consulting company Boyle Associates, which specializes in the first stages of solar developments in Maine and New England. She lives with a roommate, Mckenzie, who she met sophomore summer while doing geology field research in Iceland through Colby. In her free time, she’s taken up backcountry skiing, completing about six tours with her boyfriend so far. They planned to complete Avalanche 1 training last winter as well. * Raj Kane started graduate school in computer science at Arizona State University. He’d be delighted to meet up with classmates who find themselves in the Phoenix area. * Christine Clark Lange got married June 6, 2020, under very different circumstances than she originally planned. Her maid of honor, Charlotte Jones, was a rock throughout all the decision-making/changes. Charlotte pulled together a precious video toast so that Christine’s closest Colby friends could be “present” on the big day: Georganna Benedetto, Alicia Elliott, Austin Nantkes, Jerry Diaz, Chris Collmus, Colleen Wright, David Miller, Dylan Therriault, Ali Hassan Raza, and Keenan Boscoe. Christine and her husband shared their first look on Colby’s campus, and Rachel Leonard captured the moment beautifully! Christine now teaches fourth grade at a private school in Ohio. * Keenan Boscoe lives in Camden, Maine, and planned to open his new store, Topo Gallery, in March. Topo is an art gallery that will showcase his own photography as well as submissions by other artists, many recognizable from Colby. He encourages everyone to mask up and stop by Camden to say hello, or visit topogallery.com until they can safely travel. Here’s to supporting small Maine businesses! * Keller Leet-Otley moved to Saint Paul, Minn., and has been exploring the Twin Cities by running, cross country skiing, and rollerblading. He picked up film photography during the pandemic and has been cooking and baking. Once the pandemic is over, he’s excited to go to concerts again. Reach out to him if you’re passing through the Minnesota tundra! * Liam Wilson is in his second year teaching middle school social studies in Porcupine, S.D. He’s been teaching remotely, but he was hopeful that his school would return to in-person learning this spring.

2018

Class Correspondent:

Clare Murray
[email protected]
To ring in the New Year, Julia Endicott and Ryan Lolar moved back East after living in Colorado since graduation. Already, they’ve been adventuring across Maine from their new home base of Bangor. * Haley Jones got engaged and now lives in Dover, N.H., with her fiancé. In addition to teaching at her local elementary school, she’s been practicing yoga and tending to her two new adopted kittens. * Catherine Haut continues living and teaching yoga in Costa Rica. * Kathleen Mason spends free moments between finishing her master’s in environmental policy at Duke University hiking, cooking, and camping. Check out some of her awesome environmental-focused artwork in Duke’s Eno Magazine; I promise you will enjoy! * Anna Ramsey started a doctorate of nursing program at the University of Vermont, from where she’s also been skiing, hiking, and even starting to learn the banjo. * Nicolas Ramirez started his own private tutoring business in Los Angeles. Do you remember Shari from Dana? Well, he made a most impressive portrait of her that you should definitely ask him about if you get a chance. * Julia Borges has been busy testing out macaroon recipes for her sister’s wedding while also getting her feet into her second semester at Teachers College, Columbia University. * Martha Brainard was excited to share she received her first Covid vaccine Jan. 4 with minimal side effects. * Liam Butchart has not only been continuing with his M.D. and medical humanities M.A. at Stony Brook, but he’s also put out an album called Juvenilia (it’s on Spotify!). * Like their classmates, roommates Jay Moore and Craig Leonhardt have taken up a new hobby, chess, in between trying out more NY Times cooking recipes than I can count! * Victoria Cheff has been weathering the pandemic in Providence and has taken up baking and playing guitar as a way to stay sane when not reading for classes. She recently made a Bundt spice cake that she’s particularly proud of! * As for myself, Clare Murray, I’ve been balancing graduate school, a research assistant position, a teaching position, and a leadership role with cARTie, a new nonprofit in Connecticut designed to bridge inequities in education and arts access. I encourage any/all Connecticut alums to connect with cARTie; we could really use your help and insights!

2017

Class Correspondent:

Cecil K. Brooks
[email protected]
Greetings, 2017 Mules! As your class correspondent, I seek to uplift your stories and provide exciting updates. 2021 finds us taking on another year of uncertainty between the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and escalating acts of violence against members of our Asian community. I stand with the families of those who were taken from us because of sickness, hate, or misfortune. At the very least, we see glimmers of hope in a national reopening. I find joy in the simple pleasures, like bike rides and community gardens. I took particular pleasure in hosting Albertha Ladina and Malik Horton on my rooftop for socially distanced cocktails! * What are other classmates up to? Baturay Aydemir found out he was matched into the emergency medicine unit at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo! He and his wife, Victoria Chistolini Aydemir ’18, will move there by June, and he’ll start work June 21. He’s excited to hang out with Colby folks in the nearby Chicago and Detroit areas. * Meanwhile, Anna Jackson graduated with her M.A. in Hispanic studies from Boston College in May 2020. She’s finishing up her first year of teaching sixth-eighth grade Spanish in Brighton, Mass. * Melissa Jean approaches the end of her first year as an associate at Partners in Health, where she continues to lead impactful projects in Boston. * Mollie Rich earned her third promotion at Turnaround for Children and now serves as their data and research coordinator. * Oriana Battifarano graduated with an M.S. in geology from Boston College last year and started a job in environmental consulting in Boston. * Tarini Hardikar approaches year three as a graduate research assistant at UC Berkley, where she builds upon her investigations into Hartree Fock problems. * Katie Metayer and Maggie Hojlo continue to live together in Brookline, Mass., while working their clinical research jobs, mostly remotely. They’re hoping for brighter days ahead! * Gale Chen is preparing to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania, where he’s studying the behavioral sciences. * John Pintuaro is a post-baccalaureate student in pre-medical studies at Purchase College. * Nick Rosenberg approaches a year in his new-ish role at Breakwater Strategy as their associate director. * Acadia Brooks (no relation, unfortunately) reaches year two of living in northern Virginia, where she’s become very comfortable as a suburbanite who goes to bed at 9 p.m. In May she graduated from an online master’s program in “security” at Georgetown, which covers a subfield of international relations. For anyone with connections in the DC area, Acadia is looking for jobs! In her words, “I speak advanced Arabic, know a lot about authoritarianism, and am spunky.” * Paige Shortsleeves is rocking her first year as executive director and lead organizer at People Engaged on Active Community Efforts (PEACE-PB) in West Palm Beach, Fla. * My original reunion neighbor, Matt Weeks, is making waves in Waltham, Mass., as the new associate vice president at Chatham Partners. * Five years after touring Ecuador with Jasmyn Davis, we reside in the same location again while she serves Barnard College as their manager of the Senior Fund and volunteers. * Thank you to all who chimed in. In uncertain times, we need to keep in touch more than ever. You can stay involved by updating your contact info on alumni. colby.edu, joining our Reunion Committee ahead of our five-year reunion next year, or suggesting ideas for virtual events. I’m always happy to discuss ideas or make introductions throughout the Colby network. Reach out anytime for a catch-up call or a socially distanced hangout in New York!

2016

Class Correspondent:

Holly Bogo
[email protected]
The Class of 2016 kicked off 2021 with lots of news! * Bonnie Samantha Maldonado started her Ph.D. in Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania and moved to Philadelphia last fall. * Cameron Barner moved to Portland, Maine, in 2019 with Sophie Samuels and their golden retriever, Olive. Cameron’s working with his business partner, Ben Hamilton, to grow their small oyster farm, Love Point Oysters. While the farm largely focuses on selling oysters to local restaurants and retailers, they also ship directly to customers all over the country. * Meghan Fawcett graduated in April with an M.S.N. from Johns Hopkins and immediately began working as an ICU nurse. She started her DNP program at Hopkins in September and will be getting married in October! * Casey Romeo moved from Boston to Denver last summer. * Katherine Kibler got engaged to fellow Mule Lucas Woodward ’15 in September! * Adam Lavertu is a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford— his research project was featured in Wired magazine. His system will help with Covid responses in counties with more than 2.5 million people. * Casey Ballin moved to Portland, Maine, to join Atlantic Sea Farms, a startup that’s growing kelp and making products sold across the country. He’s happy to be back and is enjoying Maine’s waves, mountains, and good beer! * Jack Bratches joined Artifact, a personal podcasting company that helps people capture stories about their lives through interviews with professional journalists, as a founding team member. The company was named one of the best family gifts of 2020 by the NY Times. * Emily Carney moved to Europe to pursue a master’s in management at ESCP Business School. She lives in Italy and will work in Madrid this summer. * This year Kathy Trafton will finish her doctorate in earth sciences at the University of Oregon. She had a paper accepted for publication in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters. She’s also applying to teach English in Korea next year. * After learning about Sara LoTemplio’s work in neuroscience at the University of Utah, Jack Lynch invited her to video chat with his high school biology classes. She helped his students think about her research, what pathways to research exist for undergrads, and misconceptions about what scientists look like. * Wei Ma and Noah Kopp ’15 celebrated their one-year anniversary. They live in Charlottesville, Va., while Wei works on his M.D.-Ph.D. degrees. Their dogs, Noodle and Butter, have met many dog friends in their new neighborhood. * Gabi Cortez sends everyone her love! She’s living in Brooklyn, N.Y., with her senior-year roommate, Lidia Henderson, and is chief of operations at GOOD MOVE Fitness, a dance studio for all levels, genders, races, shapes, and sizes in Williamsburg. She’s also teaching movement classes, so reach out if you want to boogie! She’d genuinely love that. * Emily Sapoch is a fourth-year teacher in Dallas. She was part of the founding cohort of Urban Teachers Dallas-Fort Worth. This year she was selected as Teacher of the Year at her school. She’s also a mentor-teacher within the Urban Teachers Program. * Iavor Dekov met up with Colby alumni Toni, Esli, and Darrien! * Emily Tolman reconsidered her life during the pandemic and decided to move to Paris to pursue her dream of learning French. She was enjoying the confinement/curfew in her nine-meter-square apartment with her mice neighbors and a bottle of wine. * Erik Wilson is pursuing a master’s at Tufts in urban and environmental policy and planning with a focus on food systems. He’s also working as a data analyst for New Entry Sustainable Farming Project. He’s also taught himself the piano and almost has “Sunshine of your Love” down. * Alison Grover is finishing up her master’s of landscape architecture degree at the University of Oregon. Her master’s project, “An Urban Design Framework for Hyper functional Energy Landscapes,” weaves renewable energy into cities in an artful way. She’s picked up mountain biking as a new hobby. * Kendra Ellie relocated from Portland, Maine, to Albuquerque in January. She continues working remotely for NexRep, a virtual call center, and wants to know if other alumni live in ABQ. * Cameron Coval enjoys time camping and fishing throughout Oregon when he’s not working at his nonprofit, Pueblo Unido PDX. In 2020 Pueblo Unido PDX connected 2,500 individuals to the Oregon Worker Relief Fund, navigated 169 asylum seekers to free legal aid, and helped 19 immigrants get released from detention. * I’m living in Cambridge, Mass., and pursuing a master’s in higher education at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. I love being classmates with Abigail Anderson ’09!

2015

Class Correspondent:

Molly Nash
[email protected]
Ari Porter started 2020 off with a new job as an ecologist at a consulting firm near Boulder. Ryan Cole is less than a year away from wrapping up his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. The two of them enjoyed their access to the outdoors in Boulder even more in 2020, and they were grateful to be able to continue their work from home. The best part of their year was getting engaged on a backpacking trip! They were sad to not be able to attend reunion, but they’re excited to get back to Mayflower Hill when it’s safe to see classmates. * Meredith Braun is pursuing her M.B.A. at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. She’s engaged to be married to Richard McNeil (Bates College ’10 ... “sorry!”) in her hometown of Nashville in November. Elizabeth Allen, Olivia Avidan, Bridget Olsen, Elena Schreiner, and Lindsay Freter will be bridesmaids, and Carol Walker will be maid of honor. * Katie McElrath is deputy press secretary for U.S. Senator Tina Smith, who represents her home state of Minnesota. Katie visited Maine last summer and can hardly wait until next time. * Gregory Naigles lives in Concord, N.H., and works as an AutoCAD designer (from home—he’s actually worked from home since well before the pandemic). He had a very successful hiking year last year: he finally finished the New England 67 atop Hamlin Peak in BSP, and now he’s working on the Terrifying 25 list and on redlining. Another exciting thing that’s happened recently: Gregory served as a poll worker for New Hampshire’s state primary in September and the general election in November. The Concord Monitor ran a story titled “Younger poll workers bolster New Hampshire election day operations” that included Gregory. He hopes that everyone’s been able to stay healthy and sane during these uncertain times!

2014

Class Correspondent:

Anders Peterson
[email protected]
Camille Inman and her husband, Max, welcomed their son, Elian, to the world in July 2020. Best excuse to stay home! They’re loving parenthood. Camille and Max are based in Raleigh, N.C., where Camille attends graduate school at UNC-Chapel Hill. * Madeleine Bruce married Tom McGinn ’12 Sept. 5, 2020, in Newport, R.I. They had a small wedding due to Covid, but they plan on a larger celebration in the future. Colby was well represented: Patrick Bursee ’12, Ben Chwick, Jack Burton ’17, Michael Doherty ’12, Cory McGrath ’13, Kevin Doherty ’17, EJ Rauseo ’17, Scott Harff ’13, and Devin Albert ’17 were in attendance.

Madeleine Bruce '14 and Tom McGinn '12

Peter Hambidge enjoys practicing spiritual mindfulness and manifesting positive vibes. * I graduated from business school at USC last May and started a new job in Silicon Valley as a product manager at a software company called Sage Intacct in San Jose. I also moved to Mountain View last summer and really like living here. I love my job and frequently apply the skills I learned as a computer science major at Colby. Thank you, CS Department! On the weekends I’ve been exploring the Bay Area by bicycle and frequently go cycling in Marin County with Ryan Trafton ’12.

2013

Class Correspondent:

Sarah Lyon
[email protected]
Thank you to those who wrote in! I hope everyone is staying safe as we continue living through this strange new normal. * James Hootsmans and his wife, Kayla, purchased their first home, in Salem, Ore., and moved in at the end of March. James notes, “All are welcome when it is safe to have visitors!” * Kristina Haney started grad school at Antioch University. * Allison Hess and Dave Wollin ’12 moved to Rochester, N.Y., and were married in February. * Molly Hodson is living in Portland, Ore., working as a freelance product and visual designer, having recently completed a UX Design Immersive program through General Assembly. Molly also adopted a chihuahua named Cowboy! * Kate O’Callaghan was looking forward to finishing her graduate program this spring so she can begin practicing as a licensed therapist. Kate plans to work in the Boston area as a school adjustment counselor. She’s counting down the days until our 10-year reunion! * Holly Mawn is teaching third grade at an all-girls school in Pittsburgh. She says, “Despite the pandemic, we have been in person for all but four weeks this year. It’s challenging, but I’m grateful for the spontaneous moments that can’t happen in remote school. To stay sane, I’ve been attending virtual spin classes and was very excited to have Jazmine Russell join me for a class all the way from Phoenix. Zoom workout classes have some advantages, it seems!” * Peter and Lily Greenberg Becht welcomed Elizabeth Hopkins Becht Sept. 29, 2020, in San Francisco. The family recently relocated to Charlotte, N.C. * Kelsey Naruse graduated with a doctorate in nursing practice from Columbia University last summer and has been working as a pediatric nurse practitioner in NYC. Despite the quarantine restrictions and social distancing, she still manages to keep in touch virtually with other 2013 Mules, including Jennifer Hale, Siya Hegde, Arvia Sutandi, and Elizabeth Hughes. * Lauren Cohen Fisher says that she “accidentally” moved to the Bay Area during the pandemic. Following a two-week hiking and backpacking vacation last March in California, Gov. Newson announced a stay-at-home order, and Lauren is still there. She encourages Mules in the Bay Area to reach out! She’s enjoyed hanging out with Wes Richardson when scheduling allows. Lauren is also hoping to enjoy the national parks out West when they reopen. * Harper Burke is currently in Ann Arbor, Mich., in the second semester of her first year at the University of Michigan Law School, where she is earning her J.D. * I hope to hear from even more of you for the next issue. Stay well!

2012

Class Correspondent:

Sarah Janes
[email protected]
Will Greenberg lives in New York City with his fiancée, Deidre Miller, Middlebury Class of 2014. They’re getting married in September in Rye, N.Y. * Nicolas Iodice married his husband, Alex, in January 2020. The couple met in 2013 just after Nick left Mayflower Hill and spent a few years living in Austin, where Nick was working at Amazon and then Microsoft as a software developer. They recently moved to the Denver area. Nick continues to work for Microsoft while putting in many more hours toward mountain biking, hiking, and skiing. They love the outdoors and are beginning the search for a home. * In August 2020 Michael Brophy and his wife, Liz, welcomed their first child, Merritt Rose Brophy. * Evan O’Neill has had a very productive year. He purchased a home in April 2020, is raising six chickens, got engaged in August, and married in October in a small backyard ceremony. * Than Moore started at the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, and he’s continued to work in the emergency department as well as volunteering to administer Covid-19 vaccinations. In his free time, Than enjoys skiing and touring with friends and volunteering with the local backcountry rescue service that responds to injured outdoor adventurers in the Green Mountains. * Alex Hymanson traded in his L.L.Bean boots for cowboy boots when he moved to Dallas with his girlfriend. They’ve enjoyed the warmer weather, amazing barbecue, and golf courses. * After a short career in journalism, Jenny Chen ’13J, is now directing marketing and communications for Yale’s Department of Neurosurgery in eclectic New Haven, Conn. She also pursued a poetry M.F.A. at Warren Wilson College and continues to write in her free time. She’s hoping to take a nice long road trip after the pandemic. * Kellie Fisher and Lucas Miller ’11 got married Nov. 7, 2020, in Kennebunkport, Maine. Although it was a much smaller and more socially distanced wedding than originally planned, they still celebrated with 11 Colby friends in attendance. * After nearly six years at Dropbox, Bogo Giertler is taking a break from his tech career in Silicon Valley to enjoy the surf in Hawaii. He’s on the island of O’ahu for the first half of 2021 and is always happy to take fellow Mules for a good run or a bike ride around the island. * Lucy Wilhelms got engaged Aug. 5, 2020, to Steve Telkamp. They plan to wed in Lucy’s home city of Milwaukee, where the couple currently lives, at Villa Terrace on Aug. 14. * Mason Roberts is in his third year of lawyer life at a firm in Chicago. He has missed in-person get-togethers with the Colby Club of Chicago folks over the last year. But he remains connected to, and has reconnected with, lots of Colby friends virtually, especially swim team alums. * Jeff Carpenter adopted Noona, a very fluffy Siberian husky, at the beginning of lockdown and has been living the WFH life in San Francisco. He particularly enjoyed weekend Zoom workouts with Jonathan Kalin ’14, Cole Yaverbaum ’14, and Bogo Giertler. * Rebecca González-Kreisberg lives in Northampton, Mass., and teaches third grade online. When not busy adapting elementary school online, Rebecca completes ultra-marathons—virtual ones on self-supported loops that have kept her going during this past year. * What a joy it is after such a long year to hear all of your wonderful news. Please continue to write in with your updates, and stay safe.

2011

Class Correspondent:

Rian Ervin
[email protected]
Colt and Debbie Merzbach McElwaine welcomed baby boy Colby last April. Colby loves being outside, big sister Thea, and every food he tries. He can go to college anywhere he wants, but Debbie and Colt think he’d make an especially great Mule. * Catherine Mullin will graduate from the University of Michigan Erb Institute with an M.B.A./M.S. from the Ross School of Business and School for Environment and Sustainability in May. * In August Molly Muller and Anders Nordblom ’10 were married in the White Cloud Mountains with Ben Mawhinney officiating and Molly’s parents, Bill ’75 and Barby Beran Muller ’75, in attendance. They’re grateful to live close to a number of Colby friends and have seen Sara Ramsay, Eric Freeman, John Perkins, and Ellicott Dandy ’13 outside and socially distanced in Seattle. 

Molly Muller '11

Billy Pettengill and his wife, Meredith, welcomed their first child, Maeve Joyce Pettengill, in August. They’re anxiously awaiting Maeve’s first word—maybe it’ll be “mule!” * Despite the chaos and difficulties of the past year, Amy Hernandez Slowik managed to find a few bright spots. She cofounded a consulting firm helping companies develop and communicate their environmental, social, and governance strategies. And she married Brendan Slowik in September on her parent’s front stoop. They’re hoping for a bigger celebration this fall with Tasha de Sherbinin and Jeanne Loftus as bridesmaids. * Chris Gorud continues to live in Washington, D.C., and was promoted to chief of staff for Congressman Alan Lowenthal (CA). * Covid-19 presents immense challenges all across our country. Heather Arvidson, Sarah Carter, and Khoa Nguyen have been sharing best practices and spearheading different initiatives to support the local communities through this pandemic. * Elissa Kurtz moved to Denver to be closer to her brother, sister-in-law, and 4-year-old nephew. * Tasha de Sherbinin accepted a new job as a senior research associate for Guide for America, improving educational opportunities for high school students and their families. She married Brendan Greenwald last summer, and Amy Hernandez Slowik and Leslie Hutchings were in attendance. Tasha and Brendan had an incredible honeymoon in Alaska kayaking among glaciers with Hannah Lafleur’s kayaking company. * Mike and Liz Fontaine Squindo welcomed their first child, Wyatt, Dec. 4. They’re looking forward to his first trip to Colby when travel opens up again. * In December Andy Maguire received his Ph.D. from the University of Idaho and started a postdoctoral fellowship at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., studying seasonality in evergreen forests using satellite- and ground-based instruments. * Stephen and Alicia Kreiger Sentoff welcomed baby girl Madeleine to the family in July 2020. Returning home from the hospital, the power promptly went out. Brother Warren met his little sister by candlelight—a memory they will treasure. * David and Heather Pratt Lowe continue to live in Maine and teach for Brunswick public schools. Becoming a father to baby Nora inspired Dave to form a “Colby Dads Group,” and this group has become a great source of comfort, advice, and funny poop stories. * Nick Cunkelman lived in Utah for 2019-20, teaching math, philosophy, and French after eight years in the distance-running industry and private tutoring outside of Boston. In the spring, COC skiing weekends gloriously returned, this time to Alta, Utah, with many a Colby alum lapping the traverses and skiing new lines. * Sammy Gradwohl graduated in December with her master’s of library and information science degree. She’s excited to see where the next phase of her career takes her.

2010

Class Correspondent:

Colby Magazine
[email protected]
The Class of 2010 is need of a new correspondent. If you’re interested in serving as the next correspondent, please send a note to [email protected] edu for details. Thank you in advance.

2000 Newsmakers

Courtney Genovese Hendrickson '00

Courtney Genovese Hendrickson ’00 was featured in a Q&A by the Forté Foundation, a nonprofit that works to launch women into significant careers. Hendrickson is director of innovation at Ocean Spray, where she leads a team responsible for developing new areas of growth for the global company. * Medical oncologist Dr. Rodwell Mabaera ’02 was featured in Dartmouth Medicine magazine. Mabaera cited Colby’s supportive community, including the host family of Stephen Collins ’74, as a reason for his success and decision to enter the M.D.-Ph.D. program at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. * Matthew Kasberg ’04 received the AFCEA International Meritorious Service Award for his work as chief operating officer for Odyssey Systems Consulting Group, Ltd., a leading provider of technical, analytical, and management services for the Department of Defense and other federal agencies. * Caitlin Peale Sloan ’06 was selected as Conservation Law Foundation’s vice president for Massachusetts, where she’ll oversee all advocacy, including legislative work. She’s spent nearly 10 years with CLF, most recently as a senior attorney focused on climate change and clean air, water, and energy. * Caroline Lyons Leonard ’07, a business lawyer, earned the 2020 Kirby Award from the New Hampshire Bar Association. Leonard works in the areas of mergers and acquisitions, shareholder sales, reporting obligations, compliance with securities laws, and commercial litigation. 


2009

Class Correspondent:

Elyse Apantaku
[email protected]
Last June Robert “Bobby” Rudolph received the Anti-Defamation League’s Daniel R. Ginsberg National Leadership Award to recognize his work in the fight against anti-Semitism, racism, and all forms of hate. He currently serves on the ADL’s New England Regional Board and works at Rudolph Friedmann LLP as a complex commercial litigation attorney. * Jon and Liz Doran Albertelly welcomed baby Maxwell “Max” Jacob Albertelly June 17, 2020. All three are well, and they look forward to showing Max all the exciting things about life post-Covid. * In August Sarah Whitfield started a new job as director of annual giving at the University of Southern Maine Foundation. In September she was elected to the Wiscasset, Maine, board of selectmen. She planned on completing her dissertation and receiving her Ph.D. in May. * Tyler Plourde started a new job as a realtor in Mid-coast Maine. He helped his wife create a classroom at home, where she’s been homeschooling their 5-year-old twins. The kids are doing great! * Alexander Richards started a new job as chief of staff at OakNorth, a UK-based fintech firm. He and his wife, Kate, have been playing Mario Kart online with neighbors Adam Lowenstein and his girlfriend, Erin, since they’re all staying safe at home, even though they’re just down the street from one another. * Alex Richards also formed a government-approved, child-support “bubble” with Alex Hoder and his wife, Jenna. He had the great honor of playing Santa for their daughter, Sasha. * The pandemic has not stopped Josh Sadownik, Sam Hoff, and Alex Richards from sharing 1,000 memes a day and debating whether The Mandalorian is a worthy addition to the Star Wars universe. * Rachel Bonenfant will graduate with a master’s in social work with a certificate in healthcare this May after successfully adjusting to remote learning. * Brooke Barron had been working for the speaker of the Maine House, and then she served on the Biden-Harris Transition Team on the Agency Review Team for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She cannot wait until it is safe to welcome Colby visitors to her home on the coast in Harpswell, Maine! * Evan Footer and his wife, Aditi, welcomed a new baby in October: Ari Syle Footer. They are thrilled! * Kat Brzozowski and Wes Miller ’08 welcomed a son, Sky August Miller, in April. They’re enjoying watching him as he grows and changes. * Dan Heinrich got married in 2020. Though the in-person crowd was smaller than expected, many Colby alumni “Zoomed” in for the celebration. He and his now-wife, Chelsea Ness, cofounded Bamboo, a business management platform. * After six months of global adventures, Scott Zeller and Sameera Anwar ’10 moved to Denver in summer 2020. Despite the pandemic, they instantaneously fell in love with Colorado and wasted no time in summiting several mountains over 14,000 feet tall, all while hanging with fellow Mules Frazer Humes, Beth Cole, and Lauren Harris ’10. * After getting engaged last fall in Seattle, Danny Wasserman and his fiancée spent the winter in his hometown of Denver, which meant numerous socially distant outings with Scott. * Ben Hauptman and I moved our family to Mid-coast Maine to be closer to family, including Tessa Hauptman ’18 and Zach Hauptman ’05. Our dog, Tucker, loves his new yard, and the windows are all too small for him to jump out of. We hope to visit a vaccinated Grandpa Frank Apantaku ’71 this summer!

2008

Class Correspondent:

Palmer McAuliff DePre
[email protected]
Thanks for your updates! * Caroline Voyles started a new position as a field researcher at Drexel University’s Urban Sexuality Lab. Throughout the pandemic, she has balanced her Ph.D. studies with cross-stitching, watching RuPaul’s Drag Race, and re-reading some of her favorite Russian literature. * Sam Jones shared that Matt Hirsch has taken up competitive alpine yodeling. After a few years in Jackson Hole and Park City— spending his days skiing, mountain biking, and hiking—he found that he had a knack for hollering into the fresh mountain air. Plus, he saw Mason Ramsey (the Walmart yodeling kid) get famous and thought he could do better. If you’re ever in Park City and in need of any recommendations, give Matt a yodel. * During Covid, Meaghan Fitzgerald moved back to Seattle, remotely continuing her work for Facebook as head of product marketing for Oculus content and developers. She’s thrilled to share that she and her partner, Neil Goldberg, recently got engaged and are in the process of planning a small pandemic-appropriate wedding. She’s always eager to hear from classmates in the Pacific Northwest interested in tech and VR or simply to catch up. She hopes everyone is staying healthy and well. * Despite its many challenges, 2020 was a wonderful year for Greg and Jacqueline Grady Smith. In addition to exponential growth for Jackie’s business, Not Just Co., last March she and Greg celebrated the successful end of daughter Abigail’s cancer treatment at the Jimmy Fund Clinic at Dana Farber/Boston Children’s. They went home from her last treatment straight into lockdown and received the news that she was cured via Zoom (in true 2020 fashion). Abby is now a thriving, happy 2-year-old, and Jackie and Greg have loved having extra time at home with her, watching her grow and develop into a normal toddler. (One of her oncologists told them he was married to an ’05 Mule, so please thank him for Greg, Jackie, and Abby if you read this!) They have also been lucky enough to see Tanya Rosbash and Alex Halls ’09, Regina Wohl Clement, and Kathleen Nicholson for some socially distanced, outdoor gatherings. * Stay well, everyone!

2007

Class Correspondent:

Annie Mears Abbott
[email protected]
Jennifer Hinson and Tunde Bamigboye welcomed Coretta “Cora” Abigail Moradeyo Bamigboye on Oct. 13, 2020. Cora has been a bright spot in a rough year, and she brings them so much joy! In November she met her aunt and uncle, Jamie (Hinson ’02) and James Scribner ’99, and her cousins Walden and Reid. They look forward to showing her off to the rest of her Colby “aunties” and “uncles” as soon as possible. * Erin Schlossman and Adam Curatolo ’08 welcomed Ida Elizabeth Curatolo in January! * Alex Harris has been working as an emergency department physician during the pandemic and is ready for life to get back to “normal” as soon as possible. She and her wife, Nancy, welcomed a baby boy in August 2020 and are thrilled that something good came out of this past year. * John DeBruicker and his wife became homeowners in December, buying a house in South Philadelphia with electric fireplaces and a sweet roof deck. John has been jogging regularly, and he came in 11th place overall in the Schuylkill Loop Race, the oldest race in the city. He also became obsessed with the book Mason & Dixon by Thomas Pynchon, which he particularly recommends to anyone who took “The Postmodern Novel” with Daniel Contreras. * James Tang was recently promoted to investment banking senior vice president and co-head of equity syndicate at Alliance Global Partners, where he focuses primarily on advising and financing companies in the healthcare sector. He remains active managing his family restaurant, Hwa Yuan in Manhattan’s Chinatown, a New York Times and Michelin-rated establishment. He hopes to continue hosting Colby alums there. He’s been happy to have Chris Appel as a regular guest the past couple of years. * Christian ’08 and Leslie Peterson Crannell still enjoy life in Portland, Ore. They welcomed their second son, Liam, in October. He joins Theodore, 2. This summer they’ll move to Seattle. Life during the pandemic has involved lots of cooking, baking, diaper changes, and walks outside. * Petar and Caroline Lyons Leonard are thrilled to report that their son, Milan William, was born Sept. 25. They’re counting down the days until Milan can meet his Colby family. * Ross Kaplan sends a “big thanks to my Colby friends: Jon Bandi, Lee Emmons, Kristine (Fucillo ’06) and Trevor Hanly, Dan Melega, and Adam Roslyn. They’ve provided so much love and support during some dark times for me through mid-day mental health calls, long text chains, FaceTime playdates, hours-long Zoom sessions, even watching Nic Cage Jiu Jitsu movies together. I’m so grateful for their friendship and can’t wait to gather again for our 15th reunion next summer, if not sooner!” * Kevin Fritze has been managing his company’s response to the coronavirus pandemic since June, when he was put in charge of helping the company’s manufacturing sites respond to cases among their 9,000+ employees. While the role is challenging, it’s rewarding to help others during this tough time. Through it all, Kevin and his family have stayed safe and healthy, and Kevin has enjoyed reconnecting with Colby friends virtually. * Kyle Haskett married Jacqueline Tovar Jan. 16 in his backyard. Congratulations, Kyle! * James Cryan and Liz Coogan had an eventful year. Caleb Cryan joined his older sister Sophia, 2, in October, and in November they packed up and moved from Denver to Cornwall, Vt. After a great 10 years in Colorado, they’re excited to be back in New England. Liz started as a pediatrician at Porter Medical Center in Middlebury in January, and James will be wrapping up as CEO of Rocky Mountain Prep in June. Let them know if you’re in the area!

2006

Class Correspondent:

Lindsey Boyle McKee
[email protected]
Drew and Katie Lucas Geant welcomed Griffin Joseph Geant May 27, 2020. He’s used to long walks, masks, and social-distanced gatherings. Katie still works in finance (now from her Lincoln Park home in Chicago), running the investment grade sales desk at Oppenheimer while also covering accounts. * After being Covid-unemployed for basically all of 2020, Laura Snider started a new job as the psychosocial support technical advisor for a Lego Foundation project run by War Child Holland that promotes resilience in refugee children in Uganda, Ethiopia, and Tanzania. Laura has been chatting a lot with Taffie Gwitimah, which has kept her sane over the last many months. * Ander Tallett spent the last five and a half years at Moderna, where he ended as the VP of transformation. He left there in the fall so that another family member could join (he loves the company and mission) and launched a consulting company with Dr. John Anderson to provide digital services to other biotech/pharma companies, including two companies that are working with the U.S. government/OWS on different elements of Covid vaccine-testing readiness. * John ’05 and Emily Tull Pollakowski welcomed their second daughter, Willa Frances Pollakowski, in November. * John Wheelock has been working as an emergency management consultant since April, first supporting New York City and then the state of California on the Covid response. * Elizabeth Turner moved to Denver and bought a dental practice. She does some rewarding work with sleep dentistry and tongue ties. Liz really loves being able to help with everything from breastfeeding difficulties to athletic performance to sleep apnea. If you’re in the area and need a dentist, look her up! * Becky Greslick Vance-Charles and her husband, Brian, welcomed daughter Penelope Alice to the family last spring. With two pre-teens home much of the week doing virtual school and the new baby, they’re eagerly anticipating breaking ground on a major house addition this summer. * Emily Boyle Westbrooks has spent most of the past 12 months in strict Irish lockdown, but she’s healthy and hoping to make a trip to the States with her family this summer. * Chris Russoniello has been remotely teaching and advising his hydrology research group at WVU. He’s keeping his fingers crossed for a normal summer field season on a river in northern Alaska. * Katie Fuller is still riding out the pandemic in Boise, Idaho. Skiing and teaching have kept her sane. She’s looking forward to her first visit back to western Maine to see friends and family when this is behind us. * Meris Esterly Stout has owned Geronimo Trail Guest Ranch in the Gila National Forest of Southwest New Mexico for the past 14 years. Guests get to explore 3.3 million acres of pristine wilderness by horseback and foot and learn about the history of the area. Meris and her husband, Seth Stout, are “living the dream” and love sharing this special area with everyone who visits. They would love to see some Colby alums at the ranch! Visit geronimoranch.com to learn more about what Meris has been doing since graduation. * Alex Jospe is settling into her second year coaching Nordic skiing at Stratton Mountain School, and despite all the pandemic-induced changes is really enjoying it. She went to Finland last February with the U.S. Ski Team to work at the Junior World Championships and has spent a lot of time reflecting on how having such an awesome female coach role model in Tracey Cote has directed recent decisions. If ever there was a year to practice optimism and gratitude, this has been it! * John McKee and I are still in Longmeadow, Mass., enjoying as much outdoor time as we can with our daughters and hoping to get a family vacation in this summer.

2005

Class Correspondent:

Kate Slemp Douglas
[email protected]
In spite of its challenges, it sounds like many of you made the most of the last year. There are lots of babies, some have tied the knot, and many new jobs! * Andy Orr and his wife moved to Jackson Hole, where he’s a litigator at Holland & Hart. They welcomed their first child, Josephine, in January. * Ilana Saxe and her husband welcomed son Jack last June. They moved from a dorm into a 180-year-old house across from the Lawrenceville School campus. * Chelsea Pawlek Hadlock expected her second son in March. * Carreau Mueller Ryder recently returned to work after welcoming her second son in September. * Emily (Tull ’06) and John Pollakowski welcomed their second daughter, Willa, last November. * Hillary Klug Stuart left active duty Army JAG in April after 10 years. She’s now an assistant U.S. attorney with the DOJ in the Seattle area. She’s expecting her first child in July. * Brianna (Tufts ’07) and Michael Walsh welcomed their third child, Leia, in May. They’re very much looking forward to schools reopening. * On the contrary, Patrick Harner and his wife are enjoying homeschooling their daughters, Brielle, Tahlia, and Trinity. They moved to West Chester, Ohio, where he’s a personal trainer and junior high track and field coach. * Hillary Wiley McAllister, a clinical social worker in western Maine, remains busy at home raising her daughter, 9, a dog, and chickens. She reconnected with many Colby Sirens over the holidays via a mail exchange. * John Fallon finished his cardiac surgery fellowship at Emory in Atlanta and started at Maine Medical Center in Portland. He lives in Cumberland with his wife and two daughters, Colleen, 4, and Norah, 1 1/2. * Asma Husain Florencon, her husband, and their son recently moved to Paris. She launched her interior architecture studio and is working hard to navigate self-employment and the French administrative system. * Matt Bucklin sold the Quit Company to B&B Systems, Inc., divorced, moved to Juno Beach, Fla., started an M.B.A. at the Yale School of Management, cofounded Sense Relief (an Apple Watch app for nausea), and published “A Five-Factor Framework for Assessing Tobacco Use Disorder” in the Journal of Tobacco Use Insights. * Cheka Gage also started a new business: Mercury Advertising and Marketing, a boutique agency based in Bethesda, Md. * Nick Malick is head of upper school at Town School for Boys in San Francisco, which reopened this fall with all grades learning in person five days a week. * In nearby Oakland, Adelin Cai, her partner, and their two cats are doing well. Adelin cofounded and launched the Trust & Safety Professional Association last July. * Nels Leader, CEO of Bread Alone, announced that one of his two baking sites will generate all of its power needs from an onsite solar array, certifying it as climate neutral. * Christina Pluta married her high school boyfriend, Joe McIntosh, in February in Mercer Island, Wash. * Abbey McGuire married Matt Wright in November; virtual guests included Kara Evanko, Cat Pappas Marks, Emily Goodyear Forgett, Jess Kelly, Karinna Russo, Tara Studley, Katie Markowski Dru, and Jackie Dao Dinneen. * Speaking of Jackie Dao Dinneen, she worked on the Biden Transition Team as a national security volunteer focused on the Department of Homeland Security. She’s now transitioning to deputy chief of staff at the Peace Corps within the Biden-Harris Administration. * In March Katie Markowski Dru started as associate general counsel at Centura Health in Colorado. * Andrew Volk, his wife, and their two kids drove from Maine to Oregon, living out of an airstream and making several scenic stops along the way. * Mary Olsson Miller’s Insta account, @marymillerdesignstudio, will inspire your inner interior designer. * Take care, congrats, and may you and your loved ones stay safe and healthy!

2004

Class Correspondent:

Emma McCandless
[email protected]
Despite the difficulties of the past year, our classmates have found many bright spots! * Elizabeth Magner and her husband, Chris Sousa, welcomed their second son, Alexander Allen Sousa, in April. * Kristan Jiggetts and her husband, Ben Kenney, welcomed Cormac Bjorn Jiggetts Kenney on Sept. 3. He joins big brother Lincoln. Kristan is in her 10th year teaching high school English. She and Kirsten Helmcke were in the same “new moms” group on Zoom this fall and met up for a socially distanced outdoor playdate before the weather in Chicago turned. * Alicia Burrows and her wife, Allie, welcomed daughter Theia in July. Alicia was promoted to lieutenant colonel in the Army, and she and her family are getting ready to move to Germany, where she’ll serve as a battalion commander. * Laura Snow Robinson gave birth to her second son, Nathaniel, in April 2020. Working in a nursing home and with older adults in a day program, she says it’s been a draining year. * Tom and Allison Dwyer Webb welcomed their second daughter, Catherine “Kate” Mary Josephine Webb, Nov. 16. * Molly Given and her husband, Joe Nietfeld, welcomed their third child, Walt, in October. He joins big brother Tommy and sister Noelle. Molly and her family are still in St. Paul. * Kathryn Hulick Gargolinski had her first children’s book, Strange but True: 10 of the World’s Greatest Mysteries Explained, published in late 2019. Her follow-up, Welcome to the Future, will be out later this year. * Erica Ayotte got married to Nick Favorito on Oct. 3 in a very small outdoor ceremony in Groton, Mass. Kate Trasher-White attended, and Erica and Nick are hoping to have a much larger celebration in October for their first anniversary. * Andrew McKenna-Foster completed his library science degree at the start of the pandemic and moved to Eugene, Ore., where he’s happily working for a data-sharing company. * Cassandra Cote Grantham has been redeployed from her normal job as director of child health to serve as one of the leaders of MaineHealth’s Covid-19 vaccination efforts. She’s currently one of the operations managers at the Scarborough Downs mass vaccination clinic. She reports that the hours are incredibly long, but the work is rewarding. * Kim Strader O’Leary is 18 months out from completing her doctorate of nursing practice to be a primary care provider. In the meantime, she’s busy as a triage nurse responding to calls about everything from hangnails to chest pain to Covid. * Justin Juskewitch finished his clinical training this summer and joined the staff at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., as a transfusion medicine physician and clinical informatician. His family recently added a new labradoodle puppy, Scholar, to their household to play with Adelyn, 8, Oliver, 7, and Amelia, 4. * Nick Loukes lives in Saco, Maine. He and his wife, Sam White, were married on Feb. 29, 2020, in an intimate ceremony right on the cusp of Covid. Nick works as legal counsel for Cousins Maine Lobster, a franchise food truck and restaurant business cofounded by the grandson of a Colby alum (Class of ’39!). * Kaitlin McCafferty reports that she followed the pandemic trend and now has her own sourdough starter. She dropped off some cinnamon raisin sourdough to her neighbors Mike ’02 and Marissa MacNaughton Meloski. Kaitlin also started a new job at SoFi in February, and while she’ll stay in Boston, she’ll travel to San Francisco regularly and hopes to catch up with some West Coast classmates. * Send your news, big or small, any time to [email protected]!

2003

Class Correspondent:

Rich Riedel
[email protected]
Laura Shufelt Kenney’s family welcomed their third child, Annie, in September. Her older brothers adore her, and she’s brought a lot of joy in an otherwise challenging year. Laura has enjoyed 40th birthday Zoom calls, celebrating with Jill Geissler Meka and Sara Schwartz Mohan, and more on the horizon. * Liz Jackson got her New Zealand citizenship in March 2020, just a few weeks before New Zealand entered a one-month lockdown. Life has otherwise been normal (no masks!): her husband, David, and two oldest boys, Gabriel, 5, and Leif, 3, go to work/pre-school, and Vale, 1, is at home with her. They loved flying down to Dunedin to see the albatrosses during nesting season. They look forward to when NZ reopens its borders—they’re excited to have visitors in Wellington! * Bianca Belcher Duff and her wife, Jessica, welcomed their first child and future Mule, Elle Kennedy Duff, Jan. 3. Elle is healthy and happy! * After graduation, Etan Wenger earned a degree in industrial design from Rhode Island School of Design and has since worked as a toy designer at Hasbro on brands such as Ghostbusters, Baby Alive, FurReal Friends, Strawberry Shortcake, Littlest Petshop, and Easy Bake Oven. He lives in LA and works on Disney Princess brands and new initiatives. * Karli Jaffe Efron has joined the faculty at Saint Joseph’s College in Standish, Maine, as a field coordinator and assistant professor in social work. She is HORRIFIED that none of her students understand her references to The Office or The West Wing. * Rob Burton and his wife, Elizabeth McCracken, welcomed their first child, Connor Mitchell Burton, in October. Connor loves seeing his mother and father all day and provides a wonderful reason for them to stay home, too exhausted to notice they’re not going anywhere. They live in NYC and look forward to introducing Connor to family, friends, and the joys of the wide world when practical. * Justin Stempeck switched jobs last spring from an associate general counsel with the Massachusetts Gaming Commission to the new director of licensing with DraftKings, where he’s in charge of getting the necessary licenses to enter new states and countries. His family is doing well and recently moved within the same town, Needham, Mass. * Hal Hallstein was recently elected president of the board of directors of the Winter Wildlands Alliance, a national backcountry ski advocacy group. He encourages everyone to increase their support to environmental nonprofits as they are instrumental to the newly reinvigorated 30x30 initiative that seeks to protect 30 percent of the earth and sea from human machinations and development by 2030. * Elyssa Ford and her wife are still in northwestern Missouri. She is now an associate professor of history and runs the honors program at her university. Elyssa published her book on rodeo last fall. She recently got together with Traci Speed, Joanne Head Powell, Whitney King Billerman, and Casey Brown Harris for a Zoom mini-reunion. * Katrina Noyes moved back to Maine in May (after being away for 17 years!) and is happy to be working remotely in philanthropy. She and her partner, Colin, are hoping to make Maine their permanent home and would love to connect with classmates in the Sebago area. * In a fun football matchup in Florida in fall 2019, Kevin Smalley coached his high school alma mater’s team against a team led by former Colby assistant football coach Chris Kempton, whose team won in overtime. Kevin caught up with Coach Kempton and Luke Bechtold ’04 (in attendance) after the game and hopes to one day coach with Coach Kempton. * Sarah (Schleck ’06) and I welcomed our second son, Gus, in November; Otto, 3, loves being a big brother. In July I joined a composting company, Freestate Farms, and have loved learning a new industry while helping the greater-DC area recycle more food and yard waste. Got news? Please share! [email protected] It’s always a treat to hear from everyone.

2002

Class Correspondent:

Bridget Zakielarz Duffy
[email protected]
As the atypical continues to be typical, it is my pleasure to share bright and shining news with you from our classmates. * Noah Charney continues to write books while living in the Slovenian Alps. During lockdown he used the extra time to write his first parenting book, Superpower Your Kids: A Professor’s Guide to Teaching Your Children Everything in Just 15 Minutes a Day. He was delighted to give a virtual guest talk at Colby’s Art History Department this winter. * Patrick Fahey recently moved to the D.C. area with his wife, Kaitlyn, and their kids, Brixton, 6, Ziva, 4, and Hawkins, 2. They welcomed their fourth child, Golden, in August 2020. As a lieutenant colonel in the Marines, he works at the Pentagon and will soon take on the role of commanding officer of the airfield in Quantico, Va. He was able to connect with Brian Wezowicz and catch up for the first time since graduation. He’s also certainly enjoyed the opportunity to spend time with family that teleworking afforded him over the past year. * Ed Jastrem completed a master’s of science degree in personal financial planning. * Victor Cancel is still working as a bilingual customer service supervisor level 3 through Debt Management & Collection Systems through the U.S. Department of Education. His wife, Aileen, got a promotion as a vocational rehabilitation counselor for the Florida Department of Education. His son, Adriel Julien, has made the honor roll all year at Joseph Stillwell Military Academy. His daughter, Yesenia Cancel, continues to enjoy pre-K, “ice cream day” on Wednesdays, and helping dad water plants in the yard. * Bliss Woolmington Bernal and her family now live in Boulder, Colo. She started a new job in March as the chief compliance officer of a financial firm. They’re enjoying having a few Colby friends move to the area, including Mark Cattrell ’01. Although Covid has impacted social engagements, she’s able to see Pete Kraft as their sons are at the same elementary school. * Ward Savage and his family live in New Canaan, Conn., and are doing well. Sloane Savage was born Sept. 24, 2020. She joins her brother Creighton, 8, sister Quincy, 6, and brother Boden, 5. * A nursery full of babies were born to our classmates in October. David Zlatin and his wife, Christina, welcomed twin boys Carter and Cade Oct. 5, joining the family just over a year after their older brother was born! In Austin, Texas, Kristy Malm and her husband, David Fernandez, welcomed Sassa Constance Oct. 25. After moving into a new home in Littleton, Mass., Tammie Sebelius and her fiancé, Brian Pelletier, welcomed their son, Bryson, Oct. 29.

2001

Class Correspondent:

Dana Fowler Charette
[email protected]
Welcome to our 20th anniversary! I’m still living in coastal Cos Cob, Conn., with my husband and three competitive swim/ diving/water polo-playing daughters. I try to Jedi mind-trick them into considering Colby and wonder if they’ll attend with any other ’01 kids. Onto the news! * Tim Wiswell lives in and enjoys Bali. He and his wife had twins a few years ago so now have four boys. Tim’s working on a cool new boutique hotel concept and doing other property-development projects. Bali has been a great place to be through Covid, but they’re missing traveling, friends, and family. Tim decided to train for another half Ironman and enjoy the surf. * After four years in Texas, Danielle Fornes Quinlan moved home to Traverse City, Mich. They’re excited to be near family again, and their 4- and 2-year-old couldn’t wait to make their first snowman! * For Lauren Stevens Hannigan, life has been pretty boring and stressful the past year (I’m sure most people can relate). Two highlights were monthly house-party calls with senior-year roommates Laura Montgomery Malone, Mindy Mraz Barber, and Stephanie McMurrich Roberts, who bundled up to spirits by the firepit last fall. Lauren’s also juggling her teaching schedule with her second- and fourth-graders’ crazy hybrid school. * Pam Foxley Arifian moved her family from Connecticut to Napa, Calif., where she works in the Napa County Conservation Division. * Colin Widener lives in Columbia, S.C. His two girls are in middle school and loving it. Becca and Colin braved Covid and went sailing in the Bahamas in December, a great distraction from everything. * Briney Alltucker teaches second grade in Boulder, Colo., at the Whittier International School, where she’s been the past 15 years and where her third-grade son attends. She’s written/illustrated a children’s book, The Swirl (available on Amazon and other booksellers, and which I bought immediately!), that guides kids toward greater emotional awareness and self-compassion. * Jon Gonthier and his wife, Meaghan, welcomed their first son, Owen Robert, Sept. 4. They live in Newton, Mass. Jon left the trading desk at State Street and now works as an independent financial advisor. * Mark Cattrell, his wife, and boys (3 and 5) have learned to ski and love living in Boulder, Colo. He talks to a bunch of folks in a WhatsApp chat—Ben Farrell, Mike Kleinman, Greg Stutman, Steve Feldman, Bill Goldman, Mike Wilmot, Eric Lantzman, Owen Patrick, Chris Morgan, Tony Frangie, and Doug Otte—which offers daily entertainment. * Liz McGann Heald’s highlight last year was the birth of their daughter, Molly, on July 27. Miles and Hadley are proud older siblings. They’ve been trying to enjoy the gift of more time together as a family of five. * Sean Rinzler finally put down some roots after years in the Air Force and medical training. He’s in the Dallas area, working as a pediatric interventional radiologist and loving it! * Scott Friemann and his wife welcomed their second daughter, Ruby, Feb. 3. The internet told him she shares a birthday with Elmo from Sesame Street. Sean and his wife have been fortunate to work from home with minimal impact. * Kelly Falsani’s family grew with a beautiful black lab, Beau Tommy Bobby Falsani (middle name includes a nod to his dad, Bob Falsani ’70). They moved within Minneapolis and now have four chickens that produce delicious eggs daily. Son Sam enjoys terrain-park skiing and squirt hockey, and daughter Lucy enjoys training Beau, playing hockey and soccer, and baking. Kelly can’t wait to see friends Jon Engel, Dan Geary, and Mat Solso as Zoom calls aren’t nearly as fun as in-person shenanigans. * Mieko McKay and Kelly Miller ’03 met up on Valentine’s Day for baby bump photos in Washington, D.C. Kelly had her baby Feb. 16, and Mieko is due July 13. Both baby girls! * Due to the pandemic Jemison Foster is back in the U.S. after living and working abroad for 15 years. He’s settled in Fort Collins, Colo., where he’ll stay for the foreseeable future. He’s connected with Gabriel Duncan ’02, hopes to connect with Johnny Lay soon, and is happy to make other Colby connections in Colorado. His family remains healthy and happy, including his daughter, 3. * Abigail Parker Petz lives in Wellesley, Mass., with her husband and four kids. Before Covid, Abbie, Becky Munsterer Sabky, Jodi Dakin Loughling, Kim Lane, Mandy Cochrane Raser, and Rachel Rokicki went to Miami to celebrate 40th birthdays, as anyone who received a prank call or FaceTime is well aware.

2000

Class Correspondent:

Brooke Frappier Jude
[email protected]
I’m so happy to begin writing this column, which has been in the amazing hands of Ben Mackay for so many years (thanks, Ben!). Ben and Morgan Mackay have two kids, Robert, 3, and Charlotte, 1.5. Anticipating the pandemic lockdown, they bought a sailboat and spent the winter anchored in Bermuda. They’ll be back in Jackson, Wyo., this summer, and the boat will be chartered out of Newport, R.I. * I’m writing this from Bard College in New York, where I’ve been a biology faculty member for the past 12 years, living on campus with my husband, Craig ’99, and our daughter, Catherine. * Michael Siegel is moving this summer, along with Peter Hans, to Providence, where they plan to be roommates and start a mobile dog grooming business they’re calling “Mutt Cutts.” So far, they’ve got one investor circled: Eric Saucier. * Lynn McDonald Bentaleb lives in beautiful Monterey County, Calif., with husband Najib, a 6-year-old son, and a 3-year-old daughter. They moved there to get Lynn’s M.P.A. from the Middlebury Institute and never left. She works as executive director of a foundation that supports programs for children and youth in Monterey County. * Cornelia Nelia Rath continues living in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont, where she’s assistant head of the Riverside School and teaches “World Issues and Current Events” to very curious eighth graders. She and husband Dave’s daughter, Cornelia (the 5th, called “Cora”) just turned 5. They live in a 200-year-old brick house in Kirby with their father-and-son Labradors, Nesta (Marley) and Otis (Redding). * Jon Allen wrote with the sad news that after 16 blissful years (and two children) together, his wife, Jenny, passed after Christmas from metastatic breast cancer. Following 20 years of sailing globally, he’s now transitioning to a semi-retired directorial position ashore so he can remain home in Mallorca year-round as a single parent of young daughters (three and six). * Whitney Lawton Linnenbringer has lived on a small farm in Winchester, N.H., for the past 15 years with her husband and four children (4, 8, 11, and 12), raising cattle and pigs. Whitney’s been working as a nurse for the past 15 years, the last three as a school nurse, at a very interesting time to be in school nursing. * Keryn Kwedor got married in December 2019 and lives with husband Matt in Beverly, Mass., with their dog, Lucy. For the past 17 years, Keryn has taught language arts and literature at Landmark while serving as the associate director of the Landmark School Outreach Program. She also works as an academic coach at Endicott College with Marybeth Maney Wilhelm ’01. * Benjamin Ritz updates us that he’s moved over to an insurance-focused law firm called ThompsonCoe, is getting a divorce, and is participating in several online presentations related to his legal work directed for the public realm. * In January 2020, as part of an internal work transfer, Nathan Ellingson moved from Dubai to the Bay Area with his wife and two daughters, taking a role in overseeing all of the travel retail business for Kendo Brands, a beauty brand incubator in his group. They’re making the most of the area: taking advantage of the outdoors, wonderful farmers’ markets, and beautiful climate. * Laurel Genetti Kemp was disappointed to miss our 20th reunion (and so much more) due to a global pandemic, having been 10 years since being back on campus. She continues to live in upstate New York with her husband and two children (9 and 11). She works as a family nurse practitioner, specializing in inpatient cardiology, but shifted temporarily to caring for critically ill Covid-19 patients during 2020. * I love getting to hear from so many of you, some submitting first-time notes! Please keep them coming!

1990 Newsmakers

Kendra King Momon '94

Attorney Beth Hermanson Kinsley ’93 was profiled in a story in Vanguard Law Magazine for her work at Northland, a Boston-based national real estate private equity firm. The story reports that Kinsley, considering dropping an economics course because of illness, rose to a challenge from her academic advisor at Colby who asked, “Do you give up when things get hard?” The answer was no. * Kendra King Momon ’94 was named interim provost at Oglethorpe University. Momon is chair of the Division of Politics, History, and International Studies, program coordinator for African-American Studies, director of the Rich Urban Leadership Program, and most recently was named chair of the university’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Taskforce. * Oceanographer Vicki Ferrini ’95 was among 50 explorers recognized by the iconic Explorers Club for their role in changing the world. Ferrini is a senior research scientist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Her research explores the intersection of ocean exploration, seabed mapping, and characterization, and she has taken part in more than 30 expeditions using ships and submersibles in remote areas of oceans. * Matthew Ferrari ’96 was named director of Penn State’s Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics (CIDD). The Huck Career Development Professor and associate professor of biology at Penn State, Ferrari focuses his research on “the mathematical and statistical tools of computational biology to understand patterns of disease incidence and the effects of heterogeneity across time and space, with an emphasis on ecological factors.” * Zoë Kaplan Presley ’97 interviewed for the Oregonian’s podcast Peak Northwest about finding healing in nature. Presley, a Portland-based psychotherapist and forest therapy guide, spoke about ways to find healing in nature during stressful times.


1999

Class Correspondent:

Brad Sicchitano
[email protected]
2020 is history! Nothing will compare, and we now have stories to share with our grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Honestly, while I’m not a grandparent, I feel that 2020 aged me beyond my birthdate. I’m thrilled to share news from several classmates. * Billy and Christina Schleicher O’Donnell live with their two young kids in Whitefish, Mont., where they enjoy running into Colby alums. For the summer and fall, they head to the Midwest, where Billy flies a Beaver floatplane for Isle Royale Seaplanes in Hancock, Mich. Any hikers heading to Isle Royale National Park, please stop in and say hello. * Louisa Williams West writes, “For over a decade, a bunch of us alums raced 100-mile relay races ranging from Mt. Hood, Ore., to the hills of Vermont to Reach the Beach, N.H., and Ragnar, Cape Cod. Our team name is ‘PBR ME ASAP’ (step-up from Natty Light from Jokas). After many kids and 2020, we were unable to race as a team last year; however, many humorous Zoom calls filled the void. Shout-out to our team: Captain Peter Bowden ’98, Christina Schleicher O’Donnell, Larry Spollen and wife Charity, Kelly Bregou and husband Naijib, David and Louisa “Weez” Williams West, Brian D. White ’00 and wife Mel, Patrick “Sven” Keenan ’00, Ben Schreiner ’01 and wife Amanda, with guest appearances from Jon ’98 and Kim Waldron Barry. Be good to one another and keeping toasting PBR.” * Shane and Emily Hinckley Ellis have four kids and live on Mount Desert Island, Maine. Emily spent last year growing her homestead with gardens and animals while taking on the role of executive director for her local travel soccer club, Acadia Fire FC. She led the club through many new programs, initiatives, and hurdles brought on by Covid, and she proudly references her Colby leadership experiences for helping her adapt and find solutions for the club’s success. * Laurel Coppock and her husband have two kids and live in Los Angeles. Laurel’s in her ninth year portraying Jan, a spokesperson for Toyota, a job she loves. She’s also a Main Company member of the Groundlings Theater, where, pre-pandemic, she performed several nights a week. Laurel is in touch with Alli DeGroot and Kristin Devine but wishes she saw them more. Having missed reunions, Laurel is longing to get back to campus! * In November Ezra Dyer went to Maryland to do a Car and Driver story on Travis Pastrana. There, at Pastranaland, he ended up attempting (and barely making) a 55-foot gap jump in a side-by-side. Unrelated, he also grew a mullet. * In April Julia McDonald traveled to East Africa with Médecins Sans Frontières to provide sexual and reproductive healthcare for displaced communities. Julia teaches at a medical residency, is a staff physician at MaineGeneral, and is the medical director of abortion services at Mabel Wadsworth Center in Bangor. Honored as Maine’s 2019 Family Physician of the Year, she/they will return to their Maine-based full-spectrum practice in February 2022. * Emily Hoberg Roy lives in Amherst, N.H., and works as an educational consultant with SolutionHealth. She and her husband have two girls, 10 and 4. They spend their days with family, learning new board games, and trying to maintain their sanity. * Danielle Driscoll and Darcy Cornell met up with New England Nordic coaching legend Bob Fitzpatrick for a mini-reunion in December! #ColbySkiTeamSisters * We all love seeing these updates—thank you for sharing. Keep the news coming, and be sure to update your email with me or join the Colby College Class of 1999 25th Reunion Facebook page.

1998

Class Correspondent:

Brian Gill
[email protected]
Geoff Bennett was about begin his 13th season working as a fishing guide for Charleston Charter Fishing in Charleston, S.C. They were shut down for the majority of the spring 2020, although lately business has been booming. * David Dodwell has taken up freediving and is aiming to break Bermuda’s freediving record of 200 feet! * Alexander Howard still lives in Capitol Hill with his daughter. He works on transparency and good governance reforms in Washington as the Biden Administration begins, with a particular focus on digital democracy and embedding civil liberties and human rights into technology policy and platforms. He sees Colby alumni frequently and hopes to see more people in 2021 once we’ve been vaccinated. * Karl Dahlfred completed a Ph.D. in world Christianity at the University of Edinburgh. His dissertation was titled “Conservative in Theology, Liberal in Spirit: Modernism and the American Presbyterian Mission in Thailand, 1891-1941.” * Congratulations to Corley Hughes, who welcomed a daughter, Harriett, March 31, 2020! * Hope everyone’s family is healthy and safe during this unprecedented time.

1997

Class Correspondent:

Tom DeCoff
[email protected]
I’m happy to hear that some of you are keeping busy and managing to have some fun despite this crazy year. Hoping we’re even closer to normal next time. * It’s been fun doing Zoom trivia with teammates Adam Elboim, Mark House, Welling and Heather Derby LaGrone, Sarah Molly Lampe, Anthony Moulton, Steve Papagiotas, and Chris Sullivan. Our team, ’97 Mules, even won first place for ’80s movies! I also met Pat Doyle, Tom Moffitt, and Chris Sullivan for a socially distanced BBQ in the fall. * Jess and Sarah Holmes Tucker and their daughter, Lindel, 11, have made the best of the global time-out by spending time with the goats, chickens, bunny, and wild turkeys on their small hobby farm in Duxbury, Mass. And thanks to Zoom, they’re still connected to loved ones near and far. * Condolences to Leah Tortola Walton, whose father passed away from cancer as Covid began. She reflected on how strange isolation was at the time her family wanted to be together most. With advice from Jess Miller Pachler, whose family took a similar trip the year before, Leah and her family took an “isolation vacation” and drove an RV from Massachusetts to Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, and back. As Leah says, they wanted to see America, but not Americans. On the way home, they stopped in Indiana to get a mini-Schnoodle puppy, which has been healing their hearts since. * Zoë Kaplan Presley has been enjoying happy hour Zoom calls with Amanda Sprang Shesterkin, Katie Nevin Naylor, Meghan Jeans Svenstrup, Amy Stengel, Margot Higgins, Sarah DiMare Atwood, Sue Hesselbach Pierce, Jen Mason Drolet, JJ Eklund McGawn, and Jenna Klein Jonsson. * Congratulations to Mika Hadani Melamed, recently promoted to senior vice president at the Creative Group. She and her family got in a change of scenery by visiting Cape Cod last summer. In her spare time, Mika’s been crocheting and selling her work at wearableartbymika.com. * Unable to travel with borders closed, Peter Sheren has been “cooking up a storm” for his family in Singapore (follow him on Instagram @Circuit_Breaker_Chef). He’s also been involved in fundraising, partnering with a local sommelier to host virtual wine tastings for NGOs like Caring for Cambodia. He’s on the board of trustees for the People’s Music School, which brings free music to children in Chicago and East Palo Alto, Calif. * Lincoln Farr is co-producing a four-part, 30-for-30 documentary for ESPN about New York City in the 1980s, specifically highlighting the 1986 Mets. He says, “Sorry, Sox fans,” but it’s okay, Linc, I think Sox fans are past 1986 by now. * Danielle Herget is in her 17th year at Fisher College in Boston, where she’s the chair of the liberal arts and honors programs. She’s been grateful to catch up on Zoom parties with Mary Hofmann Henriques, Kelly Hagan McCormack, Leah Tortola Walton, Mark House, and Marc Fairbrother. * Rebecca Durham’s debut poetry book, Half-life of Empathy, is now available (see rebeccadurham.net). She frequently chats with Jess Miller Pachler, Polly Smith, Morgan von Prelle Pecelli, Meg Carlan, and Suzanne Higley. * Jennifer Lawrence Richman lives in Georgia and says she’s putting her liberal arts education to work by … photographing dumpsters (see @JenniferMcKinnonRichman or JenniferMcKinnon. com, or PBTEEN.com for other works). When she’s not photographing dumpsters, she’s usually playing basketball with her kids (ages 14, 13, and 11), watching them play soccer, trying to embarrass them, or just holding on for the ride that is parenting. She also reports that her family is trying to visit all 50 states (Hawaii, West Virginia, and New England states remain). Plans for a road trip through New England last summer were postponed due to Covid, and now she thinks Maine may be the 50th state. … Maybe on our 25th reunion? * Thanks, everyone. Stay safe and healthy.

1996

Class Correspondent:

Brad Smith
[email protected]
The only thing better than ’96 class notes would be a post-election press conference hosted at Four Seasons Total Landscaping. Wait, that DID happen. Oh well, onto the notes. * Jamie Geier wrote the best note. For one, she’s an epidemiologist, which means that until last year nobody had any idea what she did. But since Covid started, she hasn’t heard a single person ask her, “Are you a skin doctor?” But what’s really great is that Jamie’s husband is a therapist, which means that her boys (ages 15 and 12) are quarantined with a shrink and an epidemiologist. “Lots of data and ‘feelings’ about data,” Jamie writes. Oh, that’s rich! Jamie has been connecting virtually with her old roommates, Rachel Simson D’Antonio and Martha Previte Botten, which is awesome. * Kristen Drake Patterson’s notes were a close second. She shared that “it snowed in Arlington, Va.”—which is neat—but also that she joined Project Drawdown as inaugural director of Drawdown Lift, an initiative focused on climate solutions that alleviate poverty and improve human well-being. I asked, “Is that like what would happen if Jokas started delivering in a Tesla?” Seriously though, Kristen also shared that her husband and boys are doing as well as can be during the pandemic, sneaking in the occasional family backpacking trip in the nearby Appalachians. * Andrew Rice’s update was just OK. He spent the pandemic writing a whole bunch and published two collections of poems: Luminosity and Jung, At the Unraveling. Andrew, do something more impressive next time! * Take this post from Sarah Langan, for example. She has a book out called Good Neighbors, from S&S. Her family spent the pandemic in Los Angeles, and now she’s working out of a garage because she can listen to music without having to put on earphones, which are not phones at all. And just before the pandemic, she met up with Lori Kalisz Stattenfield, which is awesome, but considering that Sarah just published a book, that data point is something of a toss-away non sequitur. * (Andrew, I’m totally joking, so proud of your writing!) * As for me, I’ve spent the last few months binge-watching The Good Place with my family, getting crushed by my 10-year-old at Taboo, skating in our backyard ice rink, building a virtual consulting business, managing an ever-flowing stream of grocery and Prime deliveries, all while managing an epic text exchange with Jeff Sklarz, Dan Rheaume, Ryan Sullivan, Gregg LeBlanc, and Jean-Michel Picher covering scintillating intellectual topics like craft beer and whiskey, barbecue, New Haven pizza joints, Jeff’s favorite TikTok of the day, doily and macrame patterns, and even gender-fluid goat rodeos. We need this pandemic to end. Send more notes, please.

1995

Class Correspondent:

Yuhgo Yamaguchi
[email protected]
Ben Bartlett was easily reelected to the city council of Berkeley, Calif. He won a three-way race by a 69-percent margin of victory. Ben was appointed by Governor Gavin Newsom to the California blockchain working group, where Ben helped create legislative policy for blockchain technology and cryptocurrency innovation. * Alice Tilson Koehler recently guided Jennifer Ancker Whelen and Bruce Mason through a Grateful Dead-inspired yoga flow via Zoom. During savasana, she quietly broke into a verse of “This Land is Your Land” before ending the session with three “Hail, Colby, Hails!” * Mike Manning reports that the fantasy football league that he and some Colby friends founded in 1993 is still going strong in its 27th season. There has been some variation from the original 12 owners, but the core is intact: Chris Fossella, Rick Catino, Matt Morrissey, Jim Zadrozny, James Colligan, Tyler Rainey, Jon Zadrozny ’00, and, of course, Mike, who proudly reports that he has won four championships, including the last two seasons.

1994

Class Correspondent:

Sara Ferry
[email protected]
So nice to hear from so many of you during these strange times. * Bruce and Sue Benson Panilaitis continue to foster and have taken in two more teen boys. They’re raising 11 boys, with nine of them living in their home (ages 11- 25) and one graduating high school this spring (unfortunately, he didn’t apply to Colby). They’re putting on an addition to accommodate the boys, all of whom are on the adoption track. Sue continues to teach in Lowell, albeit from the dining room table, and Bruce is at Tufts as director of academic space management. * Greg and Erin Crossland Christopher are reliving their post-Colby ski-bum life and have relocated for the winter to Tahoe. Erin is a consulting partner at EY, and Greg is SVP development at Carmel Partners. Their kids, Shannon, 15, and Alex, 13, continue with online schooling. They regularly meet up with Josh Eckel for socially distanced skiing and tailgating. Josh and his family split their time between San Jose and their new mountain home in Tahoe. Greg has regular Zoom happy hours with Chris Austin, John Grady, Ross Nussbaum, and Jon Frothingham ’95. They recently celebrated John Grady’s victorious performance on the Game Show Network. Erin keeps in touch over Zoom with Erinne Clark, Jen Zwick Somer, and Alyssa Schwenk Adams. * Jonathan Kaplan is muddling through the work-and-school-from-home period. Like many families, they added a Covid-puppy (a Shichon) last May. For now, she’s a ubiquitous presence in the neighborhood and on Zoom calls. * Ryan and Christine Messier Feeley are happy to be living through the pandemic in the great state of Maine, where Ryan works as assistant head of school at Berwick Academy. Christine spends her time with running, photography, and doing an amazing job supporting their heroic daughter, Shea, who continues her recovery from an aggressive brain tumor, first diagnosed in 2017. Their oldest son, Nolan, is a junior at Tufts, and son Cormac is a senior at Berwick Academy and excited to start college this fall. Colby friends in Southern Maine and Seacoast New Hampshire should look up Ryan’s gigs as he continues to play solo shows and with his band, Ambulate as Tolerated, in the Portsmouth, Kittery, and York areas. He’d love to see Mules in the audience! * Josette Huntress Holland is happy to report that FaceTime and group chats have been a lifeline, often with a much-needed burst of laughter, through these weird times. She’s grateful for Jay Hartshorn, Milly Noyes Stephenson, Kamin McClelland Macomber, Lori Cohen Sherf, and yours truly. * Erik Hassing owns Angry Erik Brewing in Newton, N.J., with his wife, Heide (Girardin ’97). She runs the business and is head brewer, while Erik works full time as an attorney and part time at the brewery. He opened his solo legal practice a few miles away from the brewery last January. Owning a small business is not without its challenges, and they’ve had to be even more creative and resourceful during these unprecedented times. * Leif ’93 and Kelly O’Rourke Merryfield, married now for 24 years, are mostly outdoors these days: hiking, camping, hunting, fishing, and more. They have a daughter studying in Spain and a son, a high school sophomore, navigating mostly in-person school. Kelly’s business, Merryfield Design, has been a great way to give back to her community. With the goal of growing the next generation to love the outdoors, she’s been teaching an outdoor education class for the last five years. She and Leif also host an after-school “Survivor” class that’s always a bestseller. * Last fall Rachel Bonnell moved from South Bend, Ind., to Kennebunk, Maine, with her twin 6-year-old girls and husband. She writes: “It feels so good to be back in Maine! We’re loving the beaches, hiking, and having lots of extra family time.” * I will close with Jonathan Kaplan’s words that I think sum things up well. “We look forward to sandy beaches and towering mountains and other adventures in traveling when this ends. Let’s hope that is soon because it’s such a trying time for so many.” Be well, Class of ’94.

1993

Class Correspondent:

Jill Moran Baxter
[email protected]
Sean Greene hails from Rome, Italy, where he lives with wife Sarah and son Alexander, 13. Sean consults with several U.S. organizations about improving the elections process. He says, “We have really enjoyed our time here and hope to stay another couple of years. Learning the language (trying to at least), eating good food and drinking good wine, and living near the city center has not gotten old.” He keeps in touch with Ben Merowitz, Mike Pietraszek, and Krista Stein via Zoom. * Hilary Gehman is coaching the women’s quad at the Tokyo Olympics this summer (fingers crossed the Games occur). Last year while coaching in California, before Covid really hit, she fit in a mini-Colby reunion with Wendy Holcombe, Katie Olsen Smith, Nive Filipo Bailey, and Susan Furst Knight. They missed Kathaleen Smyth Lane. Hilary has settled in Princeton, N.J., with her husband and sons Luke, 9, and Carson, 7. * Life is good at Blair Academy, where Rod Gerdsen is associate dean of students. Rod, wife Cassi, and son Jack have moved back into the dorm, where they oversee 40 ninth grade boys. Rod says, “Jack (a ninth grader) especially loves it, and Cassi enjoys the large extended family. If you’re looking for a wonderful family-oriented boarding school, come check us out!” * Keith Dupuis authors The Tarot Sequence, a sci-fi series written under the pen name KD Edwards. The first two books, The Last Sun and The Hanged Man, are in bookstores now. Keith says, “It’s been the experience of a lifetime. I have some really committed and supportive readers. I’ve had people write songs about my series, send artwork, name horses after my main characters... I have a Hollywood agent... I’ve gotten poems from Mongolia; pictures of people cos-playing the characters... It’s just amazing. I wrote the series with the eye of creating a mainstream sci-fi story that just happens to feature characters who are gay, and I never thought it would be received so widely by people who have wanted to see stories like this, which tell their story and reflect people they know or love. It’s humbling.” Keith hopes to write nine books in the series. * Mike Murphy is spending summers in McCarthy, Alaska, again and welcomes Colby alumni to come use his outhouse. He’s enjoying the slowed pace of a pandemic; reading books, writing a book, making art, and spending quality time with his son. * Patrick Robbins reports, “I’m now living in Gardiner, Maine, with wife Rachel, stepson Ronan, and 3-year-old daughter Amira (a name I first encountered at Colby—thanks, Amira Bahu!). I work at the IT desk for Reny’s, helping the stores troubleshoot computer issues and watching security footage for loss prevention. Note to thieves: The masks you have to wear now don’t render you invisible! I’m also the features editor for Cover Me, a popular blog about cover songs; I’ve written 250 posts and counting and edit the work of a dozen staffers. I’d like to congratulate the Class of ’93 as we all take up residence in our 50s, and here’s to enjoying all 10 years of them!” * Kim Carlson McGee lives in Mystic, Conn., and loves her work for the CT attorney general on consumer protection cases. She recently traveled with the CT Bar Association on a legal exchange to Havana, Cuba, and also to Bogota, Colombia, with daughter Annelise, 15, to work on their Spanish. For her 50th, Kim is looking forward to a hiking trip to Umea, Sweden. “We’ll be communing with the sled dogs and celebrating midsommar. Happy birthday to all!” * Sarah Burditt McDougall wrote in from central Oregon, where she volunteers at a Covid vaccination clinic. Sarah says, “Let us hope that we’re heading toward more stable days. Only two years ’til our 30-year reunion back on Mayflower Hill, right?” * Right! It’s definitely on the horizon. Stay well, and keep sending in those updates!

1992

Class Correspondent:

Molly Beale Constable
[email protected]
Hilda Westervelt and her partner, Phil, are excited to move from Portland, Ore., to her hometown of Waterville, Maine. “I just ordered my Bean boots. I hope classmates will look me up when they’re in town visiting Colby!” * Kathy Lyford Bloomberg’s company, Lonza Biologics, partnered with Moderna in the spring of 2020 to manufacture the mRNA Covid-19 vaccine to be used in clinical trials, and subsequently, for the public. “I’ve worked at Lonza for 20 years, and while I’ve always been proud of my company for its involvement in the custom manufacture of biopharmaceuticals, this latest project has been a meaningful and memorable endeavor for sure.” * Jim Condron moved into a 1916 American Foursquare house in Baltimore, with a three-car garage for an art studio. Last December he conducted an interview with Amy Sherald, a fellow graduate student at the Maryland Institute College of Art and painter of the 2018 official portrait of Michelle Obama. * John Brockelman received the Financial Communications Society’s Financial Marketer of the Year award for 2020. “I’ve been fortunate to lead a number of great campaigns since I joined State Street Global Advisors five years ago, including Wall Street’s Fearless Girl, which won numerous marketing awards and continues to have a positive impact on gender diversity in corporate boardrooms today. My wife, Theresa “Tree” (Sullivan ’91), and I have two kids: Jack, a sophomore at Providence College, and Ella, a junior at Andover High School.” * Andrew Barnett writes: “My wife, Liza, and I are busy working and having fun with our kids in Chattanooga. We’ve been doing lots of outdoor activities, most involving our dog, Jojo. I’ve been teaching at the same Catholic school since 2003 and practicing my Russian with friends from Russia, Lithuania, and Poland. I play guitar regularly and write songs. Lately, I’ve been listening to Alec Haavik’s tunes on Bandcamp and emailing with Pika Ghosh.” * Margaret Russell Ewalt, associate professor of Spanish at Wake Forest University, has been teaching students via Zoom since last March. Whenever possible, she teaches face to face. “I’m masked, miked, and distanced; it’s a whole new world in the classroom.” * Mark Boles lives in Scituate, Mass., with his wife, Cary (Charlebois ’97). Mark’s business, Intrinsic Provisions, made it through the first government shutdown and gained a partner: Poncho Membreño ’89. “We were humbled to be a finalist for the industry trade organization’s Innovation Awards in our second year of being in business!” * John Cook writes from San Francisco: “Last March, my husband and I celebrated our 20th anniversary. We devoted much of the fall and winter to letter writing and phone/text banking to swing states prior to both the general election and the Georgia Senate runoffs.” * Jessica Maclachlan Gauthier launched Salt Water Real Estate in Hilo, Hawaii. “Our motto, ‘salt water heals everything,’ represents our commitment to a healthy lifestyle for ourselves, our clients, and our island home. I’m building sustainable practices into every facet of the business. Oddly, the pandemic helped catapult new technologies for selling real estate virtually, which cuts down on all sorts of harmful practices to the planet like excess driving and mountains of paperwork.” * Nancy Penrose: “I’m in my 22nd year of running Big Trees in Snohomish, Wash., and still going strong. I’m one of the lucky businesses that is thriving during Covid as everybody has been stuck at home and working on landscape projects. It’s been great to see how Colby has handled the pandemic—made me extremely proud to be an alum.” * Helen Hopkins Kellogg, Tabby Biddle, Lisa Black, Dakota Glenn Smith, and Whitney Adams Ward had planned a 50th birthday trip in the Southwest. “The pandemic canceled that, though it has given us a really great ritual of connecting via Zoom to keep in touch.” * In January former members of the Colby Eight Zoomed together to sing “Happy Birthday, Class of ’92” in celebration of all those turning 50. Many thanks to Kris Boynton, Peter Caruso ’93, Cameron Frothingham ’98, Chris Frothingham, Jonathan Frothingham ’95, Mark Longsjo, Dave O’Shea ’93, Jun Shirahama, and Curt Stevenson! * Be well, everyone!

1991

Class Correspondent:

Dave Shumway
[email protected]
Greetings, classmates! It is class news time again! * Alan Yuodsnukis is teaching a blend of remote/online and in-person classes. Covid destroyed most travel plans, including his eldest daughter’s wedding in April; Alan joined by Zoom. Alan’s youngest daughter was accepted into a graduate program at Saint Andrews University in Edinburgh, Scotland. They spent time camping along Maine’s Machias River and hiked along the Bold Coast. Being unemployed last summer also gave Alan more time to read and build fly rods. * In the summer of 2019, Paige Brown Waters saw a posting for a French teacher in a nearby town, took the plunge, and applied. She got the job and started work in November 2019, only to be hit with the school shutdown in March 2020. She took a job for the 2020-21 school year at Woburn Memorial High School. Her family has found stress relievers like walks on Plum Island, garage workouts, and lengthier meals together with discussions related to college, as she has two senior daughters. Alexandra, 17, will play soccer at the College of the Holy Cross in the fall. Gabrielle, 18, was waiting to hear back from her college applications. Their family keeps tabs on Colby news, and they can’t wait to see the new HAARC in person. * It was nice to hear from Caitlin Sullivan, who lives in Oregon with her three kids. Her oldest, 18, moved to Paris at the end of January to study intensive French. Her middle child, 16, is a ranked tennis player but has turned to skiing until the courts open again. Her youngest, 13, is a soccer player and math whiz. After years in the nonprofit world, Caitlin just started a new job at a chemical engineering company. She’s loved having family time during Covid, but she really misses playing tennis. * Becky Streett Melander reports that a group of classmates got together for a post-holiday Zoom Secret Santa. Patiently coordinated by Jess Butler, they exchanged gifts and opened them on Jan. 2 at a rowdy and reflective Zoom party. Attendees included Jess Butler, Leaf Ives Wallace, Don ’89 and Liz Helft Darby, Dan and Lesley Eydenberg Bouvier, Matt Dumas, Pete Antall, John ’92 and Tree Sullivan Brockelman, Julia Collard Pesiridis, and Matt and Becky Streett Melander. Matt joined a new practice to further develop his sports medicine orthopedic surgery career. Becky got her certification as an Inferno Hot Pilates instructor and teaches at Pure Hot Yoga St. Louis. They have three teenage daughters for whom they’re doing their best to model a positive outlook as they get past Covid. * Mark Fallon lives in Westwood, Mass. He’s married and has two step-children, 27 and 29, and a 14-year-old son. Mark writes that he and his wife are very fortunate to have been working at home during this entire pandemic. They’re both in their second careers and both work in healthcare, so they have been busy, “thankfully.” He has accomplished every household project you can think of and spends a lot of time with his golden retriever and pug. His son is a hockey player, so Mark lives the busy life of a hockey parent and coach. He’d love to get back in touch with fellow classmates. * Andy and Christina Thompson Bess have been busy throughout the pandemic, working full time from home while also building a house in Bay Head, N.J., where they’ll move this spring. Andy is a managing director at True North Capital in New Jersey, and Christina is a senior editor at Royal Media in NYC. Christina also started a small business in Bay Head last June with some friends—a needlepoint shop. It turns out the hobby has blown up during quarantine! They have two children, Hazel, 24, an assistant curator at the San Francisco Maritime Museum, and Nate, 21, a senior at Franklin & Marshall College. * Stay safe and keep the class news coming in!

1990

Class Correspondent:

Katherine Erickson
[email protected]
Greetings! 2020 proved to be a challenging year for many, and I hope you and your families all fared well. Of course, due to the pandemic, our on-campus 30th class reunion is postponed until it’s safe to gather in person. In the meantime, we had our first-ever Class of 1990 virtual cocktail party, our first virtual book discussion, and our first virtual conversation with President David Greene. Thank you to all who coordinated these events and to all who participated! * I think I speak for all of us when I say how much we appreciated having Kristin Hock Davie as class correspondent for Colby Magazine over the past 10 years or so. Her excellent writing skills and good sense of humor have kept us connected. She promises to send us her own news in the near future, and we look forward to that! * Rudy and Erika Dresser Penczer live in sunny Santa Fe, N.M., and work in the public schools there. Their grown son lives in Sacramento, and their daughter is an undergraduate at the University of Rochester. In their free time, Rudy and Erika ride mountain bikes, hike, ski, and learn Spanish. * Katherine Cole Aydelott wrote from Raymond, N.H. She and husband Jack ’91 went on a three-week African safari in 2019 with her mum to fulfill one of her mother’s bucket-list wishes. Katherine was promoted to associate professor with tenure at the University of New Hampshire in June 2020. She’s also a genealogist and information literacy librarian at UNH. * Brian Clement resides in Portland, Maine, with his wife, Carolyn, and their three daughters. He’s been a financial advisor with RBC Wealth Management in Portland for the past 30 years. He stays in touch with Mike Smith, Jeff Merrill, Dave Carney, Matt Gibbons, and Matt Hancock. He sees Hilary Goodman Robbins ’91 running frequently, and he bumps into Jim Clifford occasionally at the gym. * In January 2020, Cinda Jones won Business West’s Massachusetts’s Top Entrepreneur Award for her work envisioning and creating a new town center in North Amherst. Her work was also cited in Business West’s news magazine’s top 10 change-making events of the past decade. Congratulations! * Susan Kachen Oubari reached out from Paris, France, where she currently lives. “I’ve had one of the most incredible years of my life..., even though I had Covid-19 in March 2020!” As a pioneer of Breathwork (a breathing technique to help alleviate stress) in France, she co-wrote and published the first book in France on the subject: Breathwork: Respirez pour changer. In September 2019 she had an amazing reunion with Kelly Cogan Calnan, Maeve Costin Giangregorio, Mya-Lisa King, Clare DeAngelis Connelly, Kristen Pettersen Miller, and Kristen Fryling Bingel ’91 in Marblehead, Mass. Follow Susan on Instagram @susan.oubari or check out susanoubari.com. * Holly Peirce and Sean Pratt moved with their 16-year-old son from San Salvador to Colorado Springs, Colo., last summer. In San Salvador, as part of the U.S. Embassy team, Holly and Sean helped repatriate Americans back to the U.S. from El Salvador during the beginning of the pandemic. Holly led efforts to promote telework and keep the embassy community of more than 1,000 safe and effective. Holly is now a deputy foreign policy advisor at the binational military NORAD-NORTHCOM Command in Colorado Springs. Sean is busy setting up their home and figuring out what to do with 20 years of stuff from around the world. * We loved hearing from all of you! Details of our postponed reunion will be disseminated by our reunion co-chairs Beth Poole Parker and Steve Coan. Be on the lookout, stay safe, and please stay in touch!

1980 Newsmakers

Chris Mellon '80

Chris Mellon ’80 appeared in the documentary The Phenomenon, an examination of government cover-ups of UFOs. “We need to accept that we are not alone in the universe,” Mellon said. A former senior intelligence officer for the U.S. Department of Defense, Mellon is now a private equity investor.  * Dave Epstein ’86 was featured in a Boston Magazine piece titled “Winter, the Weatherman, and Me.” Epstein has more than 41,000 followers on Twitter, the article said, and another 62,000 on YouTube, where his videos have been viewed more than 19 million times. * James Fast ’87 has taken on a leadership role of the MOLLER Project at the Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The new project manager role will require his expertise in building a large, new detector and other systems. * Meg Galloway Goldthwaite ’88 has been named chief marketing and communications officer (CMCO) of the Nature Conservancy. With substantive experience working in branding, visual storytelling, digital communications, and media for a variety of organizations, Goldthwaite is the first woman to serve as TNC’s permanent CMCO.


1989

Class Correspondent:

Anita Terry
[email protected]
As I write this, spring is coming to Minnesota. I’m hopeful that this year will see us gathering again with friends and family, and before long we’ll be together on Mayflower Hill for our 35th! Colby has become an even bigger part of my life, not only because my daughter is a student. Since last April, I have had the gift of a weekly Zoom conversation with Meg Christie, Tracy Gionfriddo, and Doug St. Lawrence. We laugh, cry, and have tough conversations. The Colby connection is a deep one, and I am grateful for them and for all of you. * If, like me, you obsessively check Johns Hopkins’s Covid-tracking maps, you can thank David Fearon! His department at JHU helps run those maps. * Rev. Mark Wilson left Waterville (again) for the United Church of Christ in Waitsfield, Vt. * Still in Maine is Diane Pearce Kew, who teaches at Freeport High School—in person, with lots of Covid testing. David Kew ’90 works from their Brunswick home, and their 23-year-old son is also there working remotely. Their daughter, a junior at Eckerd College, was home for January, so they had a full house to celebrate Diane and David’s 30th wedding anniversary! * Melissa Early Ruwitch has reconnected with former Colby professor Garry Leonard and has been listening to his U of Toronto lectures on her walks in Forest Park in St. Louis. Melissa is grateful that her kids finished college before the pandemic, that she still has her job at Washington University, and that she remains close with Colby friends, thanks to technology. * I received a short note from Jeff Casto, who didn’t fill me in on anything but sweetly checked in on my health (which is great, thanks for asking!). * Another of my freshman dorm-mates, Krisan Evanson, wrote that she appreciates her tech skills more than ever, as she is teaching online, attending Zumba classes online, and selling needlework for humanitarian funds online. She said it better than I could: “Despite Covid family deaths and the upheaval in so many things, I’m hoping that classmates are able to do what we do best: adapt to change and keep our eyes on the prize.” * Jim Klimek checked in from Indianapolis, where he enjoys keeping up with fellow lawyer Josh Christie ’03 and said that Sizwe Banzi is still dead. * Another classmate becoming expert at online teaching is Mark Cosdon, a professor at Allegheny College. Mark was directing a play when Covid struck and canceled the performances, so he turned his attention to the NY Times Spelling Bee, where he claims to regularly achieve Genius level. I can’t even get the easy puzzles, so I’m not sure whether to be skeptical or jealous. Mark’s yearly visiting post in Sicily was also canceled for 2020, but he compensated by naming all the worms in his compost bin and freezing bushels of tomatoes and pesto. * The theme of 2020: getting by with a little help from our friends. Hang in there, classmates, and keep sending your news!

1988

Class Correspondent:

Kate Walker
[email protected]
Greetings, Class of ’88! I hope that you and your families are staying safe in these challenging times. Although we may often feel isolated, it’s wonderful to hear how many of you are maintaining your Colby friendships. * Ellen Meigs looks forward to her biweekly Zoom calls with Heidi Kampersal Petrosino, Patty Rush ’87, and Lisa Kilmer Steven ’87. Their record call time is 3 ½ hours! * Another class Zoomer is Scott Smith, who has a weekly Sunday “meeting” with John Davie, Harold Rider, Gary Donaldson, Jeff England, and Eric Zieff, when they discuss news of the week, family, and Colby-related news. Scott works as director of administrative financial services at Colby. His oldest son, Sam, lives in Winslow with his wife and son and teaches in the elementary school that he attended. Scott and Kristen Foss Smith love seeing their grandson weekly since playing with toys and trucks helps take their minds off the pandemic. Middle son Gabe lives at home and works as a tele-rep until something better comes along and/or grad school. Their youngest, Ben, is a Colby senior, who has a weekly show on WMHB. Hopefully, you caught Scott’s guest DJ spot in November, where he showcased many of our favorite ’80s party tunes! * Ayme Allison Hooper works as a middle school counselor in White Salmon, Wash. When schools went remote, she took her high school-aged son, dog, and two cats and headed south to Arizona. Although it was stressful at times to find reliable internet for school meetings, there were many highlights such as visiting the Grand Canyon and Chiricahua National Monument. * Remote learning has also impacted Meredith Magie. Her only child missed out on his senior prom last spring and had his graduation in a drive-thru ceremony in a parking lot. Although she’s sad and disappointed about the missed milestones, she’s impressed by the resilience of younger generations. * Kristen Sween Alcala checked in from Wyoming, where both she and her husband, Jesse, have found new jobs and a new home in Cody, just outside Yellowstone National Park. Their guest room is set up if anyone wants to visit! Kristen works for an outpatient behavioral health clinic managing a medication assisted treatment program. * Another classmate with a new position is Sean Collins, now head of digital experience for State Street Bank. Sean recently traveled to Waterville and reports that “the new athletic center is beyond! And, downtown Waterville is becoming quite the place as well!” * The Nature Conservancy (TNC) recently announced Meg Galloway Goldthwaite as the organization’s new chief marketing and communications officer. She lives in the Washington, D.C., area with her husband and three children and is based at TNC’s worldwide headquarters in Arlington, Va. * Stay safe, classmates, and let’s all keep in touch and support each other!

1987

Class Correspondent:

Scott Lainer
[email protected]
It's time to peruse, then muse, upon news you can use. (Take that, Amanda Gorman!) * Jennifer Shackett Berry retired from the boarding school world and started educational consulting. “While the bulk of my work is in school and college counseling, I'm also assisting schools with strategic initiatives, leadership mentoring, and marketing. Our empty nest in New Hampton, N.H., is slowly becoming repopulated. Adult children working remotely have fled the city for respite and home-cooked meals in the New Hampshire hills. I’m also now twice a grandmother.” (And we're twice surprised, Jen!) * Hannah Howland Judson released an album of original folk-rock songs in March. (How cool is that? I'd be impressed if they were plagiarized folk songs.) Find it at Stingray on Spotify. “Last year, I was on a small U.S. tour with my songs. I performed in Los Angeles, New York, Burlington, Vt., Georgetown, Maine, and Charlestown, Mass., and shared wonderful moments with Gary Christensen, Todd Bishop, Aimee Good, Marcus Ratliff, Sean Sullivan, Andrew More, Trish Curry Glass ’86, and Paul Evenson ’85. The past few summers I've been working in the San Francisco Bay Area and get together with Gina Werfel, Hearne Pardee, and Jim Frew ’86. I’m amazed and grateful at how current these Colby friendships have remained.” * Heather C. Anderson writes, “I have three social teenagers whom I’m trying to keep in the house, and about 60 free-range chickens that I want kept out. Bruno, our old border collie, knows how to open doors but not shut them. Lots of reading— at the moment, Nomadland by journalist Jessica Bruder—loafing, backgammon, baking, evening walks with my husband and dog in Flint Field, perusal of Johnny’s Seeds catalogs, laundry, awaiting college acceptance letters, hiding in the woods for a smoke, and grocery shopping for elderly parents who live nearby. It’s a good life.” (Cigarettes, cigars, or do you just smoke, Heather?) * Todd Bishop is retiring this spring “after 25 years at MoMA and moving to Miami Beach. So now I’m a divorcé and a retiree. How’s that?” (Fetching to many, I'm sure, Todd!) * Jim Sullivan’s two children are now at Colby, first- and third-years, “and really happy to be there, even if they’re masked up and eating grab-and-go. My wife and I live in Cape Elizabeth, where my PR business in hotels, resorts, and golf courses has been in free-fall since March. One good thing about a pandemic and a collapsed business is the time to pursue other interests, including writing. In December Scribner published my book Unsinkable (ussplunkett.com) detailing my search for the one man who was always missing from our cookouts and holiday gatherings when I was growing up in Quincy years ago." (Would that be me, Jim? Apparently not!) * John Bookis “is teaching and learning every day on Zoom and in person here at Concord-Carlisle HS. It's been an honor and privilege to teach the children of four classmates over the years. (Had to flunk them all, but still.) Deborah and I are planning to build a house in Camden for our retirement. I wish you all the best of health; let’s hope for a better 2021!” * Bill Clendenen writes that Teri Scally Kinsella was in Eugene, Ore., visiting her son “and we got together for a socially distanced glass of wine and visit to my farm. My horse thinks Teri smells good, or at least better than me.” (What else does your horse think, Bill? Talk often, do you?) * Jeff Russell “is flat out at work, but in what little spare time available is relearning Spanish, playing guitar, relearning snowmobiling, and restoring Boston Whalers. This year also promises to be very busy. It's mid- January as I write, and I still haven't had time to put the airplane on skis for the season. (Who knew airplanes could ski?) Hoping for a week in March downhilling with the kids, including Ali Russell ’18.” * Be best, classmates!

1986

Class Correspondent:

Susan Maxwell Reisert
[email protected]
Hello, Class of 1986! Many thanks to everyone who sent news and shared what they’ve been up to during the pandemic. I’ll get to those stories in a moment. * First things first. A very big congratulations goes to Rich Deering. He received the Halsey Gulick Award from Maine Summer Camps for his service and dedication to Maine’s summer-camp community. In all he does, he offers energy, enthusiasm, and the kind of care one colleague described as “a warm hug wrapped in a wide smile.” Rich is most involved with Birch Rock Camp, where he serves as alumni and community director. Rich has shepherded many offspring of Colby alums through the summer camp experience, including sons of Jen Imhoff Foley, Geoff Alexander, and Colette Cote, and my son, John (now BRC’s waterfront director). * I received several pandemic-related stories, as well as a photo of Jay Allen and Evan Dangel enjoying a bit of fresh air while snowshoeing in Weston, Mass., with appropriate provisions, of course. Jay’s twins are at Colby. Evan’s older daughter is at NYU, and the younger one is at Lesley. * Jessica Flood Leitz and her husband decided to use the pandemic time to gut their kitchen and take down three chimneys, and to take on the work mostly themselves, at their house in Melrose, Mass., while also housesitting in Merrimack, N.H., near her childhood home (so that she can keep an eye on her aging father). Jessica runs government affairs for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Her middle son, Nils, and his partner, Evan, moved in during the pandemic. Thankfully, they cook and clean. Another son, Keegan, is getting married in August. And Duncan graduated last year from Colorado State University with a degree in logistics. Anyone interested in making a job offer? Jessica has found that one of the saving graces of the pandemic has been regular communication with Amy Barnes Hurley, Terry Appleton, Lisa Foley Cooney, and Robin Clisby Pelczar. 2020 was the first year in about 30 that they were not able to spend a “Birthdays Weekend” together. They hope to make up for that loss in 2021. * Diane Smith is in Maine. She and her family have been thinking up creative ways of using their backyard ice rink. * Charlene Crocker wrote in, reminiscing about the time the two of us went into downtown Waterville to share an ear-piercing, one ear for each. Such rebels we were! (Since then, both of us have had the other ear pierced as well.) Charlene lives in North Dakota, with husband and kids, and has been working at the University of North Dakota for the last 22 years. * Dave Mace works for FEMA, splitting his time recently between working hurricanes in Florida and the Covid-19 response at the Atlanta office while working from home in Vermont. * Jen Imhoff Foley is now director of philanthropy at Mercy Hospital in Maine. Congrats, Jen! * As for myself, I continue to enjoy life on Great Pond in Belgrade. My husband and I had hoped to escape from Maine last summer, to visit Peru, South America. When that trip was canceled, we decided to hike in Peru, Maine, instead. Lovely views, but alas, no ancient ruins anywhere. Keep writing and sending your news! Cheers!

1985

Class Correspondent:

Tom Colt
[email protected]
Elliot Kolodny’s son, Jack, is a junior at Juilliard studying double bass. He performed at Carnegie Hall with the Juilliard Orchestra just before the pandemic hit. One of Jack’s music teachers in high school was Christopher Horner! * Our condolences go to Kathleen Gillespie, whose husband, Tom Garvey, died June 9, 2020, from complications of cancer. Kathleen, who lives in Lexington with her son, Ben, is continuing her career as an immigration attorney and legal consultant. * Paul Swartz, living in North Andover, highly recommends that people read Unsinkable, a WWII book by Jim Sullivan ’87. * Rob Hazard and his wife, Stefanie, live in Rhode Island and have stayed in touch with Andy Sheehan, Marita Stapleton, and Lisa Diffley Hernandez via talk/text over the last few months. Rob’s work in the printing and graphics business has remained steady. * Susan “Cali” Lang was teaching programming and computer and software use until 2019, when she left Connecticut, went to Carlsbad, Calif., and earned a graduate gemologist (GG) certificate, completing the six-month course in 14 months. She’s now in a jewelry design and technology (JDT) program, opening up lots of possibilities. * Carol Eisenberg has been happily working remotely at her home on Peaks Island since March 2020 and says she’ll never go back to the office full time. She notes that the biggest silver lining was the gift of having her eldest daughter stay with them for most of the year. * Dwayne Jackson had big plans for a trip to China, which were interrupted by the pandemic. Moving forward, he plans on visiting London, Bermuda, and Croatia. * Lori Gustafson Adams and her husband moved full time to their lake house in New Hampshire, just in time to work remotely during the pandemic. They also welcomed their first grandchild and are having a great time being overindulgent grandparents! * Kathy Hughes Sullivan still lives in Ipswich, Mass., where Cory Humphreys Serrano has recently moved with her husband. Gage Foster Woodard ’87 has moved to the area as well. Kathy connected with Lalyn Ottley Kenyon ’86 recently. Kathy’s oldest son, Slater ’18, moved home after working for Ridley Scott in LA for two years. Son Tamer will graduate from Amherst College this year. * Roy Hirshland and wife Chris split their time between Boston’s Back Bay and Cape Cod. They’re now empty nesters with daughter Sammy off in graduate school. * Lesley Melcher Greer moved back to Kittery, Maine, to be close to family. She’s working at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard after being a GM/VP for Neiman Marcus. * Ben Lowry has retired from his law practice and is living in Encinitas, Calif., where he umpires high school and college baseball games and plays disc golf. When he visits Maine, he connects with Brian Hesse ’84. * Tom Claytor is in Burma with his 7-year-old daughter, enjoying occasional camping outings. * Clare Secker-Walker is a QA engineer at a company that provides reservation software for ski resorts. Working from home during the pandemic allowed her to keep up with her garden last summer. * Lynn Brunelle is with her husband and two sons (one in college, one in high school) on Bainbridge Island, Wash., where they’re cooking, hanging out, and hiking a lot. Lynn has done some work on podcasts for kids, such as Imagination Neighborhood and a Sesame Street podcast called Foley and Friends. * Brian and Amey Travis Barnes have been retired for the last year and a half in Annandale, N.J., where she works on household projects and makes musical recordings for her church. They’re also empty nesters with their sons living in PA and Frenchtown, N.J. * Carolyn (Boynton ’84) and Kevin Bruen’s son Chris has been accepted to Colby as a recruited swimmer. He’s the fourth family member, along with Conor ’17, to attend Mule Country! Kevin is connected via Zoom with Wayne Eddy, Rodney Krause, and Tom Valinote. * I’m in Shanghai, where life has been surprisingly normal during the pandemic. Megan and I have been able to do some travel this year—to Xi’an and Yunnan province.

1984

Class Correspondent:

Marian Leerburger
[email protected]
Thank you for your news! We have folks doing such interesting things, especially in the time of Covid-19. * Heather Nicol Rutherford still lives in the beautiful Cotswolds in England. She loves the countryside and feels privileged to live there. She’s a parenting coach and really enjoys running her own business. She has three children (17, 19, and 21) and two beautiful Labradors, Ernie and Alfie. While she tried hard to get her children to attend Colby, they all decided to stay in England and attend university there. * Ann Brachman has lived in Norwood, Mass., for more than 25 years and has worked at Cimpress PLC, the publicly traded parent of Vistaprint, for the past 10. Her son, 25, and daughter, 22, are employed college graduates, something we certainly all strive for! Her job is now permanently remote, so she’s delighted to never have to drive on 128 during rush hour again. * The pandemic is keeping Sam Staley’s professional and personal life more focused than usual. He’s engaged in some world-building around his near-future science fiction novel St. Nic, Inc. Published in 2014, the novel reimagined the Santa Claus myth as a reality-based international crime thriller. (“Santa Claus” is Nicole Klaas, an MIT alumna and fourth-generation descendent of the first Santa Claus.) The novel is definitely not a children’s story, so he has commissioned authors from a wide variety of genres. So far, authors representing medical thrillers, YA dystopian science fiction, horror, paranormal, and literary fiction have committed to contributing. The target publication date by Southern Yellow Pine Publishing is September 2021. * Jeff Nottonson, who owns Whitford House, a bed and breakfast near Middlebury, Vt., purchased his neighbor’s barn property at the most inopportune time: at the onset of the pandemic last February. Twin View Barn, now beginning to book weddings, turned out to be a hot vacation spot for those fleeing the city during the “new normal” of remote work and limited social life. “With Vermont’s early lodging shutdown and subsequent partial reopening, we were fortunate to have done any business at all in 2020. Fortunately, with our standalone guest house, curbside breakfast, and new, seasonal barn property, we found a way to attract grateful guests.” Jeff invites Colby alumni to visit! * Lisa Kuzia Krueger sadly lost her sister-in-law, Susan Robertson Kuzia ’82, to brain cancer on Aug. 26, 2020. Susan was married to Lisa’s brother Stan ’85. On Sept. 9, Lisa and her family welcomed their first grandchild, Rowan Ming Ren Teo. Lisa traveled to Dubai, where daughter Caitlin and her husband, Daryl, reside, to meet Rowan in November. * David Ballou is celebrating! The law firm he started in 1991, Ballou & Bedell, P.A., located in York, Maine, is celebrating its 30th year in practice. Congratulations, David! * Scott Morrill and his wife, Jane (MacKenzie ’83), moved into a renovated 1945 bungalow in southeast Portland, Ore., well away from the downtown riots. They also adopted a shelter dog from Houston and are busily training their precious Blueberry. During the pandemic, Scott wrote his first book, which is a humorous account of their year in China. Find My China Dream at Amazon. * As for me, I spent quite a few months working one week on, one week off for my job, and realized I really don’t need to go to movies, malls, or inside of restaurants. Hiking and taking the dogs out is just fine. Luckily, my daughter is at home, working on her master’s in social work, and I did have contact with employees at work during my week on, so that satisfied my social desires. Since Remy, my working therapy collie, was needed in the hospitals (and he doesn’t have a driver’s license and can’t do his work without someone holding the leash), I was fortunate to get my Covid vaccine early. I hope all of you stay safe and are able to get your vaccines soon!

1983

Class Correspondent:

Jennifer M. Thayer
[email protected]
Hey, hey, hey! I hope this finds us all safe and sane. I made the impulsive decision to sell my house in late summer 2020. With Hudson Valley real estate so crazy, I had 17 showings the first weekend I listed, two bids on Monday morning, and an agreement by Friday. A week later, I had an agreement to purchase a groovy place in Albany, to which I moved in September. For the time being, I enjoy Governor Cuomo’s press briefings, and I’m sure that SOMEDAY when things “open up” again, it’s gonna be LIT! * Speaking of “LIT!”, I got some book recommendations in response to my request for news. Chris Easton is working through books by Colby authors, most recently Robert Parker ’54 and Linda Greenlaw! Chris has a volunteer hustle as a local EMT and notes that in 2020, he responded to 125 calls compared to 75 the previous year. That’s micro metrics for you! * Elaine McClellan Niemann wrote that she and Scott ’84 relocated to Washington State in late 2019 for a last work-type huzzah before Scott retired. Elaine’s naturopathy practice has ported nicely to the online format of our Plague Year, and they have enjoyed the Great Northwest Outdoors. On Zoom reunions, they’ve connected to a number of Scott’s former classmates and our own Jamie O’Neill (hiiiiiii, Jamie, send news, kk?!!). For her LIT! recs, Elaine has been on a personal development tear with The Servant by James Hunter, her current fav. * Good to hear from Geoff Ballotti, who sent a short missive noting that two of his four daughters are in nursing working on the front lines at Mass General in Boston (both contracted Covid and have since recovered!), and one of his four daughters has married. Amen to his wish for brighter days ahead!! * I received an even shorter missive from George Katz. In service to our class, I did press for more information. In the meantime, all I can report is that he’s alive and well enough to type. ;-) * Deena Schwartz Ball sent her intention list for 2021: first, that husband. “Curt ’84 retires and has more time to enjoy the outdoors and family, Deena perfects the art of teaching watercolor on Zoom,” and lastly, “we enjoy our family, especially our two young grandsons. We look forward to moving to the Portland, Maine, area and living close to both our daughters and their families.” Deena hopes that they’ll find a place in the next few months, and I hope she’ll share the deetz with us for next time. In the meantime, check out her work at DeenaSBall.com, and you can sign up for classes in watercolor or other materials. #HighlyRecommend * I am delighted to have a message from Jennifer Knoll Bouchard, who hasn’t shared in FAH-EVAHHHH!! “After 25 years in Massachusetts, my husband, Page Bouchard ’84, took a work assignment in San Diego in August of 2019, as a last job assignment before retiring. We looked at this as an adventure and a way to spend a significant amount of time on the West Coast exploring all the Southwest has to offer. While we have enjoyed several mini-vacations to the Mammoth Lakes area, Joshua Tree NP, Catalina Island, and Taos, N.M., the pandemic has made it quite difficult to fully enjoy everything on our bucket list…” not to mention cramping those visits back East to spend time with the Fam Squad. Their son and his fiancé are in Boston, and their daughter is a student at Northeastern. Jennifer has happily availed herself of Zoom to connect frequently with our classmates Jan McDonnell Trafecanty, Diane Therrien Lamper, and Christine Marshall Gaudette. I also enjoyed hearing about Jennifer’s work with their Andover church to educate on systemic racism in area communities and that she is organizing a Season of Service and outreach for people during this still-ongoing pandemic. * Captain Dan Parrott wrote from Blue Hill, Maine, where he climbs Blue Hill Mountain daily with his hound, Finnegan. Dan shared his musings about our generation’s culture, which perhaps keeps us from interacting more as a collective. I’m thinking about that as I consider who writes and who doesn’t. * So: if you’re in the latter group, send news, book recommendations, and—for now—fantasy vacation ideas! I confess to peeping rentals in Old San Juan…

1982

Class Correspondent:

Sarah Lickdyke Morissette
[email protected]
It was a cold winter in Bethel, Maine, where my husband and I have been hiding out since March 2020. My Labradoodle puppy was stuck inside and going nuts, and I envied classmates who chose to settle in warmer climes! * Claire Brovender Liliedahl dropped a note to say Sarah “Foxy” Fox Whelan, Cathy “Smitty” Smith Badmington, Ellen Huebsch Anderson, and she had a fun weekend in New Hampshire, filled with lots of beer, wine, great conversation, and a bit of skiing at Loon Mountain in early 2020. She’s also gotten together with Susan Wechsler Goode in the past few years, and Claire and Jean Appellof Segal participated in the Boston Colby Alumni Club’s event at the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts—a yearly outing for them. On the way home, they phoned Mark Farmer and had a nice long conversation about life and kids. * Jim Haddow and wife Michelle updated and repaired their 175-year-old house and barn last summer. They each lost parents, made more painful by the pandemic-related restrictions. Jim draws hope from his children’s commitment, resilience, and positive energy in their work as a medical resident and as an owner of an oyster farm in the Damariscotta River. He’s thankful that his family is housed, clothed, and fed and hopes that all of us find occasional silver linings in the current dark cloud. * Paul Maier is excited to assume the role of head coach for Wentworth Institute of Technology’s club hockey team as of January 2021 and is looking forward to getting on the ice soon. Paul’s son, Kal, a Wake Forest School of Business, magna cum laude graduate, was the goalie for the WF club team, which progressed to the final game of the regional tourney. Kal was honored with the ACHA player of the year award; he now works for Brown Brothers Harriman in Boston. Daughter Paige is enjoying “Tiger town” as a junior at Clemson, majoring in international business and hunting for a summer internship. * Jeff Brown and wife Jessica had a big year, bookended by the marriages of both their children. Hannah, now in Boston, married in January, and Alec, in Denver, tied the knot in December. Hannah had a big bash, while Alec’s was a small family gathering with a Zoom contingent. J & J are downsizing in Pittsburgh, where they’re renovating a smaller house down the street from their current home. * Bob Benjamin retired as a colonel from the Army Reserve in September, after 32 years of service. His last job was acting commander of the 310th Sustainment Command in Indianapolis--about 7,500 soldiers. Bob is enjoying the retirement checks but misses the camaraderie. He’s spending his newly freed time on his motorcycle, which relieves the cabin fever! Bob still teaches at Brunswick School in Connecticut. While teaching last year was remote, this year they’re mask-to-mask in the classroom. Bob’s also been preparing to teach a new course on leadership and strategy. One of the works included is Leadership in Turbulent Times by Doris Kearns Goodwin ’64, which seems particularly appropriate right now. Bob enjoyed a socially distanced dinner with old friend Fritz Canby ’84. Bob’s family is well— they’re empty nesters but Zoom weekly to keep in touch. * Linda Hurwitz Zoomed with Susan French Fine, Ann Foster, and Claudia Goulston to toast their big birthday milestones and stay connected. She’s practicing violin at home for now and teaching virtually until things improve for the arts (live concerts) and classrooms. Linda’s doing lots of walking and bicycling, and she’s looking forward to our 40th in 2022! * The pandemic hasn’t had as much of an impact on Paul Veilleux, partly because last year was his first full year of retirement. Paul’s busy with home projects, making toys for underprivileged kids, and spending time with his grandchildren. He also joined the Medical Reserve Corps. Last year they ran flu clinics specifically to prepare for the Covid vaccine rollout and are now fully engaged in vaccinating people. * All contributors, and I too, wish blessings, health, and joy to our classmates. Hang in there everyone, and stay well.

1981

Class Correspondent:

Ginny Bulford Vesnaver
[email protected]
Hi all! I received lots of news, so I’ll get right to it. * Eleanor Campbell Swank welcomed her first grandchild, Pepper Ada Conklin, in June 2020. * Pamela Heleen Spear began a new job in August 2020 as associate director of board affairs for the Connecticut System of Colleges and Universities in Hartford. * Val Talland has cofounded an arts nonprofit, the Movement Arts Creation Studio, an incubator space with residencies and production support for emerging and mid-career professional dancers, circus artists, choreographers, and physical theater artists. * Kimberly Hokanson began a new job as director of annual programs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. * After 14 years in the general counsel’s office of Stallion Oilfield Services, Bob Ryan has shifted to ERISA litigation, working for Cigna. He had dinner last summer with Bob Clark and John Breneman ’83 in Portsmouth, N.H. He also visited a recently retired Dani Nemec Micsan in Virginia. * Mary Coe Connolly and her husband moved from Silicon Valley to Davis, Calif., to begin retirement closer to two of their three children. They had a whirlwind fall 2020 navigating the move, California’s wildfires, work, and, of course, the pandemic. They enjoy their four grandchildren, with another one due in June. * Bill Lichtblau continues to teach skiing and looks forward to a post-vaccine trip to Europe. * Judy Greene Stewart was elected moderator and chair of the board of directors at the Congregational Church of Needham, UCC in January 2020. Judy’s biggest job has been to support her husband, Scott, chair of anesthesia and director of peri-operative services at Good Samaritan Medical Center in Brockton, Mass., as he works through the eye of the Covid-19 storm. * After 10 years at Fidelity Bank, Sally Fernsten Buffum still enjoys her role as a commercial loan officer. Her husband, Dave Buffum ’80, is teaching and, so, navigating Covid-19 effects on the classroom. * Diane Young is loving retirement, although she had a serious bicycle accident in 2018 and has no memory of it or the ensuing seven days of healing. After returning to her home in Saratoga, N.Y., she officially retired and hit the gym to regain her strength. She’s been enjoying swimming at her Naples, Fla., home; skiing and biking in Vermont; and biking, horseback riding, and gardening in Saratoga. * Ginny (McCourt ’82) and Bob McCurdy enjoyed dinner and a live blues performance with Jay Votta in Greenwich Village in February 2020. They missed seeing John Foster and Greg Pomeroy, who were unable to join them. Bob and Ginny live in Newburgh, N.Y., where Ginny is a secondary English teacher and Bob runs his small family manufacturing business as it approaches 46 years in business. He has plans for a strong rebound in 2021 after the challenges of 2020. * Tory Sneff Schulte celebrated 10 years at K12 Insight in Herndon, Va. She’s the Eastern seaboard regional account director working with public school district leaders. Tory’s 2020 marathon running plans in Boston, Berlin, NYC, and Richmond, Va., were canceled or run virtually. Her 2021 marathon calendar is now jam-packed. * Work has kept Mark and Barbra Cooper Comunale busy. Mark is chair of anesthesia at a large county hospital, where he’s navigating the pandemic. Barbra has been growing her medical coding and billing business. They’ve taken up pickleball and have found it to be a sanity-saver. * Meg Bernier Boyd volunteers for the board of the Waterville Community Land Trust, which is revitalizing Waterville by renovating houses to sell to potential buyers often left out of the market. Affordable homeownership is key to a stable neighborhood, Meg says. The trust also opened a park overlooking the Kennebec River in Waterville’s South End that’s planted with seasonal flowers and naturalized banks to prevent erosion. “We’ve been lucky to have Colby students on the board, and whole crews of Colby students help on Colby Cares Day. It’s an amazing community effort.” * Dawn Brydon Sweeney retired at the end of 2019 (good timing?!) from more than a decade as CEO of the National Restaurant Association. She’s now an executive in residence at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, a part-time principal for the New England Consulting Group, and serves on the board of SITE Centers (NYSE: SITC). She and husband Tim live in Longboat Key, Fla. Their son, Kevin, will graduate from James Madison University this spring. * I’ll close with the common sentiment: We’re looking forward to being together again on campus one day soon!

1980

Class Correspondent:

Kevin Fahey
[email protected]
Chris Mellon is in rural Pennsylvania these days, but you may have also caught him hard at work trying to save the earth from an alien invasion in the recent documentary The Phenomenon, released on various streaming services last October. You may not have recognized him, of course, but he’s in there. * Joy Crafts McNaughton describes her post-full-time law life as still pretty busy. She’s a contract mediator for the state of Maine and has a private personal-injury mediation practice. She and her husband, John, live in Wiscasset and usually go to Florida for a few months in the winter. * Barb Neal and Sarah Davis ’79 enjoy life as they continue to build their small farmstead in Ithaca, N.Y. Both of their kids graduated from college in 2020, so they attended two virtual commencement ceremonies. Barb is the horticulture and agriculture extension agent for a local county, keeping busy helping farmers stay in business during the pandemic while also working to increase food security in her community. Barb and Sarah’s first post-pandemic trip will likely be to the UK for some hiking and touring around regions known for their sheep. * Barry ’79 and Liz Yanagihara Horwitz planned to do something special for their 40th anniversary, but couldn’t, so they celebrated at home. Their daughter, Ali, earned her license as an architect last year, and their son, Michael, made a very timely exit from the restaurant business at the end of 2019 and is now a software developer. Barry continues his independent consulting and teaching at BU. Even though there are no rehearsals and concerts, Liz is busy recording from home for various groups making virtual concerts. She says the best job, however, is babysitting their grandson, Oliver, 3. * Beverly Mellen Snively lives in Winston-Salem, N.C., where she’s worked for Wake Forest School of Medicine for more than 20 years as a professor of biostatistics. Aside from work, over the past several years she’s been learning the sport of rowing (both sculling and sweep). Bev rows and competes when and where she can. She looks forward to being on the water this season and hopes someday she’ll have an opportunity to row near Colby. * Although we didn’t get to meet in person for our 40th reunion last June, more than 40 members of our class have participated in at least one of the three Zoom sessions we had on June 6, Sept. 18, and Jan. 14. While nothing is a substitute for seeing everyone in Waterville, modern technology has been a big help in keeping us connected during a crazy year. Joining me on one or more of the Zooms have been: Lynn Collins Francis, Susan Sullivan Hinrichs, Fred Madeira, Elliott Pratt, Linda Alter Capell, Louise Swift Price, Diana Herrmann, Jackie Low Chee, Jonathan Greenspan, Ellen Pokorny, Cornelia Armbrecht Brefka, Liz Martin, Tom Eyman, Peter Bishop, Mary Lynah Bishop, Geoff Becker, Patty Valavanis Smith, Tommy Marlitt, Caroline Weeks DiProspero, Beverly Mellen Snively, Betsy Morrell, Brenda Bowen, John Carpenter, John Flerlage, John Veilleux, Cynthia Auman King, Suze Connelly Levere, Steve Kirstein, Cathy Palmer Smith, Jean Minkel, Dale Hewitt, Lawrie Foster, Gregory Mills, Tim Hunt, Bruce Anacleto, Barb Neal, Sue Thompson Sadler, Glenn Rieger, Tom Dailey, Tina Chen Starke, and Alice Domar

1970 Newsmakers

Jim De Yoreo '78

Veteran birder Bob Duchesne ’75 wrote an article about the northern goshawk in the Bangor Daily News, detailing multiple encounters with the fierce accipiter. Duchesne is vice president of Maine Audubon’s Penobscot Valley Chapter, and he developed the Maine Birding Trail (mainebirdingtrail.com). * Jim De Yoreo ’78 was named a 2020 Distinguished Science Fellow by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, an honor that is accompanied by a $1-million research grant. A materials scientist, De Yoreo is a laboratory fellow at DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. 


1979

Class Correspondent:

Cheri Bailey Powers
[email protected]
Greetings from Colorado! I hope this finds you safe and healthy. * Jane Gair Prairie feels lucky to be working from home during the pandemic as a telehealth therapist at the New England Eating Disorders Program, where she’s worked more than 22 years. Not having to commute or pack meals is a nice change. Jane is considering letting go of full-time work as a social worker and exploring her training as a Reiki practitioner. Her third-degree training has taught her tools to provide distance Reiki and keep friends, and even their pets, safe from Covid-exposure risk. Pursuing longstanding interests in alternative healing, mysticism, and spirituality in her 60s is freeing. Jane’s husband, Keith, is preparing for retirement and enjoying his musical talents. They enjoy Zoom meetings with their son, Everett, and his fiancé, where their dogs and cats don’t bother Jane’s allergies. * Robin Towle Glynn retired in 2019 from teaching middle school Spanish and French. She trained to be a “step-on guide” in Salem, Mass., to provide local information for buses of tourists on multi-state tours. A part-time Spanish teacher position to cover a maternity leave at a private school has turned into a recurring gig. Last December Robin and husband Dennis moved to a brand-new home after 36 years at the same address. Weekends are spent in northern New Hampshire four-wheeling, snowmobiling, and chilling out. * Elizabeth Armstrong was the resident director of an abroad program in Kyoto, Japan, when the pandemic hit last March. She was responsible for getting students out of the country and safely home before lockdowns. It was quite a challenge. She left Japan in April after tying up loose ends. Elizabeth taught entirely remote at Bucknell last fall. She has lost several extended family members to Covid and hopes that this year we’ll bring the pandemic to its knees. * Now that she’s retired, as of Dec. 31, 2019, Kathy Bleakney Pawley found time to send news. She and Keenan look forward to traveling and spending time with extended family and friends after Covid restrictions end. Kathy volunteered for Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign. In early March 2020, she went on a wonderful trip to Paris with five friends and got back just before the borders closed. Kathy hopes that everyone is healthy. She’s so grateful we had our reunion in 2019 and looks forward to seeing everyone at our 45th in 2024. * Liz (Yanagihara ’80) and Barry Horwitz have managed to stay healthy and busy through the pandemic. Their daughter and her boyfriend live with them, their son and his family are nearby, and Barry’s parents are close too. This “bubble” has worked well. And by being careful, they’ve been able to provide daycare for their grandson, Oliver, 3, a few days a week. They postponed their plans for a 40th wedding anniversary trip, but they’re cautiously optimistic for 2021. * Emily Grout Sprague has spent a lot of time at home and on outdoor adventures. Northern New York had its first true winter in several years with lots of snow and cold temps, which remind her of the “real winters” we remember on Mayflower Hill. She’s happily occupied with building a new house on their lakefront property—a complete renovation. Emily enjoys her volunteer and philanthropic work with the Northern New York Community Foundation and with hospice. She stays in touch with some Colby buddies in an ongoing and hilarious text chain filled with social and political commentary and photos and trips down memory lane. They’re spread all over the country, but they stay close in one another’s hearts. * The beginning of 2021 was full of tumult, joy, fear, hope, and intense weather. Hopefully, by now, things have settled down and a sense of calm will prevail. That is my wish for all of us.

1978

Class Correspondent:

Lisa Mathey Landry
[email protected]
Greetings, classmates! I’m grateful that this column brings news of retirements, relocations, families, and friendships, the everyday events of our lives, even in uncertain times. * Over the past 10 months, Jeff Wheeler has had two rotator cuff surgeries but hopes to be back on the golf course by summer with Sandy Buck, Peter Schmidt-Fellner, Bob Underhill, and Chris Morrissey. He’s impressed by Colby’s handling of the pandemic, and he looks forward to seeing the athletic center and attending our 45th reunion on Mayflower Hill. * Recently, Lisa Klein Boldt enjoyed a live-stream talk on the artist Fairfield Porter. She first enjoyed his paintings in 1977 at an inspiring Colby exhibit for which Professor Carpenter compiled the catalog. * It’s likely that his work with WMHB began Phil Redo’s career in the radio and television business. He and Bob Kaake ’77 worked for Viacom Radio in Chicago, New York, Seattle, and Los Angeles. He retired as general manager for WGBH, Boston’s PBS station, where he oversaw local news content. Phil and his wife moved to an 1820 farmhouse in Brunswick, Maine, where he’s writing, painting, and making music, found on his website PhilRedo.com. Covid has “put a real crimp” in meeting new neighbors and keeping up with old friends, but he’s reconnected with some frat brothers since his return to Maine. He salutes the direction David Greene is taking the College. * Lise Greenfield Shanahan and her husband left California and retired to a golf community in Bluffton, S.C., near their daughter. Lise was happy to discover that Barbara and Pat Gill live nearby, as do Patty and Kevin Murphy ’76. Now that she’s on the East Coast, Lise hopes to attend our 2023 reunion and her nephew’s graduation from Colby in 2024. * Bethlehem, Pa., is where Kim Miner lives. She retired three years ago from a global company as chief human resources officer, a position that meant she and her husband of 32 years could travel extensively. They have four children. Since retirement, she’s kept busy with executive consulting and involvement in their church. * Sandy Buck spent 15 months serving on the Maine Climate Council. He worked with an impressive group of citizens to create the “Maine Won’t Wait—A Four-Year Plan for Climate Action” with the goal to make the state carbon neutral by 2045. He and Sissy are fortunate to have their children and grandchildren nearby. He’s regularly in touch with Bob Underhill, Peter Schmidt-Fellner, Jeff Wheeler, Chris Morrissey, John Geismar, Mike Boyson ’76, Kevin Carley ’76, Bill O’Donnell ’79, Ellen Grant ’79, Bob Bower ’80, and Henry Kennedy ’80. * After spending the winter in Roatan, Honduras, Francie Palmer Christopher and her husband sailed home to Hull, Mass., and their seven grandchildren, ages 1 to 4. * Pam Cleaves Devine’s company, the Business Learning Institute, was acquired by the Association of International Public Accountants. As global director of client and partner services, she’ll provide assistance to finance and accounting professionals. She and John Devine are often in Connecticut and Maine to visit their daughters and six grandchildren. * Fifteen years of working from home means that Larry Hill hasn’t had to adjust his routine much due to the pandemic. He has designed an app called the Express Console, released on the SalesForce AppExchange store. He’s excited by its prospects! In November he saw Dan More, who had Covid without even knowing it. * Nancy Piccin looks forward to a “well-deserved retirement” after one more year of work. In the meantime, she’s perfecting her recipe for air-fried salt-and-pepper chicken wings and making a lot more soup. She missed her traditional December trip to warmer climes, but she did have a good, though brief, Christmas visit with Judy Fairclough. * Finally, there are big changes ahead for Gerry and Mary Foley Boyle. Mary is retiring as curriculum director of the Waterville-area school system, and Gerry is handing his editor’s pencil to his successor at Colby Magazine. They say it’s time to become “roving grandparents” to their Maine and Irish grandkids and to spend time in warmer places than Maine in the winter. Congratulations!

1977

Class Correspondent:

Russ Lowe
[email protected]
Lots of news to share! Richard Conant Jr. grew up in Concord, Mass., next door to Acton, where I live. He reports: “After Colby and grad school, I wound up working 33 years for four very different Federal government agencies as a marine biologist, aquatic biologist, wetlands biologist, and finally with the Naval Submarine Base in Groton, Conn., as an environmental program manager and eventually as the environmental director, i.e., desk-bound supervisor/bureaucratic paper pusher. After retirement, I picked up my hiking/ climbing passion again. I knocked off the AMC’s 100 highest of New England before moving on to do state high points. I’m at 44 ¾ths high points now (ask me about the three-quarter sometime if you want to hear a real story!) with mostly kick-butt climbs out West still to do. I’m scheduled to do a guided technical climb up Mt. Rainier this summer with my eldest son, Covid-permitting. My three sons are all grown and situated west of the Mississippi with wives/significant others and doing grad school or working. Here in Mystic, Conn., I more than occupy my free time with a regional land conservancy, Avalonia, sitting on a couple of boards and in the capacity of chair for the Groton Shellfish Commission. The latter helps me reconnect to my marine biology roots, which I wandered mightily from during my career.” * Being class correspondent allowed me to catch up with my old friend Carolyn “CC” Cain Eng. Last year, all of their family went to their son’s wedding in Cozumel, Mexico. They came home March 10, two days before airports closed for international travel. All the guests arrived home in time and nobody got sick. She had to close her piano studio as all students went virtual. In her church job, she shifted to arranging and then recording accompaniments and tracks for the choir. She’s had fun talking to Sally Reynolds about using Garageband to put together anthems for her church as well. Carolyn’s daughter, Stepher, had a second child in LA that she hasn’t yet been able to see. * Jonathan Fenton has taken a new teaching job at the Northeast Woodland Chartered Public School in Conway, N.H., teaching English and social studies to fifth, sixth, and seventh graders. The school is brand-new, just opening its doors this year. Most students are in-person and all are behind masks when indoors. Jonathan and his wife, Corinne, moved from their family home in Norwich, Vt., in the fall to a condo in North Conway. They have two children who are healthy and living and working in Massachusetts: Jonathan in North Dartmouth and Katie in Boston. * In January Zachary Wechsler was quarantined in LA with his ex-wife and three rambunctious teens. He spends much of his day working on moral character issues for wayward state bar applicants and wayward attorneys, and no time at trial or court. The La Niña this year brought a mild, sunny, dry winter to Los Angeles. The surf is up! * Bill and Chris McKeown Burry have been sequestered in Mathews, Va., on the southern part of the Chesapeake Bay since last March. During a normal year, they would have sailed north to the Canadian Maritimes, visiting Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Instead, they arranged encounters with former Colby classmates. They hosted Carolyn Frazier and husband Duncan Moore for a barbecue around their pool on the Fourth of July. Then they took a lark trip to Vermont to buy a “new to us” Joel White-designed Shellback sailing dinghy. They stayed in Concord, N.H., for two nights visiting Peter Breu and Susan Woods. And all four finished out the year with a New Year’s Eve Zoom. A fitting end to a very stressful year, further enhanced by turning 65 in 2020! * Let’s all get the vaccine soon and stay safe in 2021.

1976

Class Correspondent:

Robert Weinstein
[email protected]
Hello, ’76ers! When I wrote my last column last spring, little did we realize what 2020 had in store. Here’s hoping you and your loved ones have been safe. Please reach out to friends who have been on your mind—add that to your own plans! * As for class updates, O.J. Morgan will retire in June after 40 years as an educator in Chattanooga—23 at Baylor School and the last 17 as head of Bright School. He’ll miss the kids most of all. * Sherry DeLuca Delany’s son Joe will attend Colby, but he’ll spend his first semester in Salamanca, Spain. Joe’s twin brother, Koo, will attend Elon University in North Carolina. Sherry and her husband are overjoyed to be empty-nesters and look forward to traveling to parts unknown post-pandemic. * At the end of 2020, Barry Rabin semi-retired from his solo ophthalmology practice. He still works part time for another ophthalmologist, with much less administrative stress. Barry’s daughter, her husband, and young granddaughter moved across the street; everyone’s thrilled and gets along well. Barry was in touch with Martin Hubbe and Gil Becker—both are well. * Since Covid started, the annual gathering Wendy Swallow has with Julie Stewart, Joy Sawyer-Mulligan, Kathy Jewett, and Heather Eng Finney has become monthly Zooming to provide support and company during this dark time. There’s been both good news and not-so-good on all sides, but they’re stronger together. Three of Wendy and husband Charlie’s four employed adult kids lost jobs during Covid, but they’re now resetting and even pivoting their careers. It was hair-raising at first, but she thinks they’ll be okay. Wendy’s been giving Zoom book talks for her novel Searching for Nora: After the Doll’s House; thanks to the pandemic, she can book a tour without travel. * Diane Lockwood Wendorf has led worship live on Facebook since March 2020. Last June she celebrated 40 years in the ministry, the same day her husband, Mark—who was ordained the same day— retired. Diane illustrated and published a Covid-specific children’s book, The Lonely Playground, written by her colleague Maren Tirabassi; it’s available from Diane’s Etsy store. Diane is contemplating retirement while maintaining consistency and care for the congregation she’s served for almost 13 years. She had a great visit last fall with Toby Bobbitt. Speaking of Toby, she officially retired from Amherst Public Schools last summer with more than 22 years of school counseling experience. The move to virtual education and school services was enormously challenging, yet it provided some of her best teamwork experience ever. Despite the Covid loss of her favorite gatherings with extended family, choir, a cappella group, and multiple church activities, Toby loves retirement. She does plan to look for part-time employment eventually. * Enid Gardner Ellis retired last July, as her husband, Bill, had a couple of years earlier. She worked the previous eight years in her school district’s business office. Bill and Enid share the gardening, and she’s learned to make jam, can pasta sauce, and freeze all sorts of veggies. Enid volunteers for her town’s committee and is bringing the town hall up to ADA standards. She’s rekindled her love of sewing and also archiving and cataloging generations of family photos. Once travel is safe again, she and Bill plan to hit the road in a small camper they purchased. Enid keeps in close contact with Debra Hirsch Corman and looks forward to seeing her in 2021. * Irene and Peter Labombarde welcomed Lucas, their first grandchild, last April. They visited Lucas, son Evan, and Evan’s wife, Angie, in Oklahoma last August. Peter’s two daughters were also there. Katherine is completing grad school at the University of Denver, while Jocelyn started med school at the University of Oklahoma. Peter and Irene, both healthy and fully employed, send greetings to all. * And that’s the latest! Remember to donate to the Colby Fund. Stay safe and be well, my friends!

1975

Class Correspondent:

Susie Gearhart Wuest
[email protected]
Wayne and Laurie Fitts Loosigian are enjoying their place in Venice, Fla., and will plan another Colby gathering for nearby alumni next year. They’re still loving their little apple orchard in southern New Hampshire and particularly their grandsons, who live across the street. * After retiring from her architectural/engineering practice, Janet Hansen Drouin is now the Region 1 (New England) director on the National Council for Architectural Registration Boards. Locally, Janet and husband Bruce Drouin ’74 are involved in the Royal River Alliance, which is trying to facilitate the removal of two dams on the river in their town to allow sea-run fish passage. Janet was recently appointed to their town’s planning board; she and Bruce are also involved with developing a community center in their town. Their youngest son is an assistant project manager for a large construction firm and was working for the University of Miami’s hospital system. Once vaccinated, they hope to drive their RV to visit him. Their daughter lives in Lewiston and works for L.L.Bean; their oldest son lives outside of Boston, where he’s director of analytics for Asics, a Japanese shoe company. They do miss traveling: two riverboat cruises in Europe were canceled last year, but one is rescheduled for September. * With absolutely no traveling since Covid hit Manhattan, last summer Ed Walczak started biking in Central Park for the first time and found the park much bigger than he had realized with some really challenging hills. * During the pandemic, Jim and Sally Hawk Gibson have felt very fortunate to live in Maine and to have family there. They get out and walk, hike, or x-country ski daily. Last summer Sally enjoyed paddle-boarding on Norway Lake, where she could visit friends and neighbors socially distanced on the paddleboard while others were on their dock. A baby granddaughter was born Oct. 6 in Lynn, Mass. They’ve made two visits for the joyful opportunity of holding their grandchild. Their two married sons live in Maine. Sally misses seeing all of her family in SC, NC, VA, and other points. Jim is now retired but Sally continues to work at Fryeburg Academy. * Sue Staples Smith shared that her husband, Richard, passed in October 2019 at the age of 90. He always enjoyed accompanying her to Colby reunions. Sue now volunteers as a trustee for the Mount Washington Valley Adult Day Center, her passion inspired by Richard’s struggle with dementia. She also launched a new business in 2020 running the Chocorua Village House, opening up two-thirds of her large farmhouse as short-term rental property. Twenty years after she and Richard bought the house, the odd three front doors are finally coming in handy! Sue is ready to retire from her volunteer position serving as secretary for the Kiwanis Club of Mount Washington Valley for the last 22 years. * Alan Berry continues to enjoy teaching math at the Emma Willard School in Troy, N.Y. During much of the pandemic, Alan and his wife, Sarah (Dailey) ’74, have seen two of their four grandchildren, who live nearby. Through a mutual friend, Alan learned that their mutual friend, Joseph Jones, has been serving as president of Fresno Pacific University since January 2017.

1974

Class Correspondent:

Dennis Delehanty and Richard Vann
[email protected]
As the pandemic grinds on, the daydreams of our classmates have shifted from river cruises in Europe to two shots in the arm, carefully timed, at a local health clinic. * Even as lockdowns took hold last spring, Amy Caponetto Galloway’s daughter managed to marry and produce the family’s first grandchild, while her son secured an assistant professorship at SUNY Purchase College. After more than two decades as an elementary school teacher in Bedford, N.Y., Amy retired last June, but not before her school district had adopted remote education. Though this decision required her to learn a whole new way to teach, Amy missed the contact with her students “in real life.” In the meantime, baking, jigsaw puzzles, yoga, and long walks have consumed the family’s free time. * While the virus may have kept us indoors for chunks of the year, the social isolation imposed on us has serendipitously produced several pandemic babies. Proud new grandparents include Pamela Brownstein, Jody St. Hilaire, Richard Vann, and Howard Lazar. And classmates seeking a meaningful book to read to their own grandchildren might look into Michael LaPenna’s new detective story, Baby Jesus is Missing, published last December and available on Amazon. * From the Bay Area, Tom Gill writes that he retired two years ago after selling his solo CPA practice in Pleasanton, Calif., and that he’s been enjoying travel with his wife, Beverly, to Europe. Tom’s favorite trip lately was driving—not sailing—a “narrowboat” on England’s historic canal network at the breathtaking speed of three miles an hour. The leisurely pace made for time to soak in the bucolic vistas of the English countryside. Along the way, Tom and Beverly learned to operate the antique canal locks and dined nightly at 300-year-old pubs. * Karen Heck managed to slip in a two-week trip to the Yucatan last winter before the virus took over our lives. In August, she sold her house purchased 39 years earlier, downsized her belongings, and moved to a furnished apartment, which she is now ready to leave for months at a time when travel is again feasible. After selling a boat built by husband Bruce (Olson ’76) that had become uncomfortable for older folks, she bought a roomy cabin cruiser upon which she hopes to ply the waves on Penobscot Bay. * Along with Karen, another classmate who accomplished much for the betterment of Waterville is Mike Roy, who retired at the end of 2020 after a 16-year-long stint as city manager. Under Mike’s tenure, downtown Waterville underwent a transformation into a newly vibrant city, where Colby campus buildings now stand alongside an arts center and boutique hotel. Information about Mike’s achievements in Waterville is available online at centralmaine.com. * Our warmest congratulations go to Jane Dutton, who last fall was awarded an honorary doctorate from Erasmus University in Rotterdam for her “internationally recognized contributions to research on management and leadership.” Jane’s engaging and informative acceptance speech can be viewed on YouTube. * In November good news also arrived from Yarmouth, Maine, as we learned that Art Bell had won election to the Maine House of Representatives. Art’s term is for two years, but who can now guess his political trajectory? * S. Ann Earon reports that she is among the few for whom the pandemic has brought increased work. For over 40 years, Ann has worked in audio, web, and video conferencing. Now, Ann can finally explain her career to friends by pointing to Zoom. We are grateful to online conferencing executives such as Ann since we have seemingly lived on Zoom and similar apps over the past dozen months. Our own Class of 1974 held a Zoom call last October 1, kindly arranged by Colby and expertly moderated by Deb Wathen Finn. This was a fun event, enjoyed by all attending, and we hope to see many more classmates on our Zoom calls as we approach our 50th Reunion.

1973

Class Correspondent:

Carol Chalker
[email protected]
The Class of ’73 has managed to find projects large and small during quarantine, and one rather monumental project is entering the eighth decade of our lives. I passed through this portal early in January, and my family surprised me with a very special parade past my house. It was a lovely way to begin a new year and a new decade. * Martin Darling writes from Washington State. He’s been retired for many years from various positions in the mental health field and looks forward to the world opening up again so he can possibly pursue guardian ad litem work. While he waits for release, he’s planning the perfect garden that doesn’t feed the deer. * Sterling Williams has prepared for the eighth decade with the purchase of a 35-year-old sailboat, which he has “repaired, replaced, and got her ready for spring.” Sterling is enjoying his nearly two years of retirement from a long banking career, trading in his home in Atlanta for a beachfront condo in Carolina Beach, N.C., where he plays a lot of tennis while he waits to resume traveling. * Ida Dionne Burroughs is grateful for her dog to keep her company during this pandemic; they hike, walk, and spend most of their time together. Ida was looking forward to the vaccine so she could visit her children in Alaska and Brooklyn. When she’s not outside with her dog, she’s been reading, practicing the piano, doing the Tango on Zoom, and cooking.* Rick Zaccaro and his wife live in Portland, Maine, and have been busy installing heat pumps and solar panels on their home. Adding to their planet-saving actions, they purchased a Prius. Aside from climbing mountains by himself last summer, Rick has enjoyed weekly Zooms with his siblings, who all live in different states. * Bruce Smith writes with the exciting news that he and his wife’s oldest grandson will make them great-grandparents this spring. Congratulations, Bruce and Connie! * Kathy O’Dell described a pandemic silver lining as more regular gatherings with Colby friends. “A group of us ’73 alums—Sue Feinberg Adams, Deborah Keyes, Lois Leonard Stock, along with Rhode Island School of Design friends we met during our college years and worked/lived with in Kennebunkport the summer following graduation, along with Leslie Anderson ’71—have been getting together annually for years, usually around Portland, Maine. Not to be deterred by Covid-19, we started Zooming to share concerns over national/ global and personal/professional events, celebrate progress and successes, and stay on our creative toes! Here’s to continuing such practices when we can gleefully reboot our face-to-face reunions.” * Peter Rinaldi, officially retired from the newspaper business, spends much of his time blogging these days. He and his wife did some traveling last summer, including to Killington, Vt., Banner Elk, N.C., and Natchez, Miss., before returning to their home on Little Hickory Bay in Florida. * Norm and Pat Flanagan Olsen, usually accustomed to adventurous travels, keep busy with their chickens and roosters. Norm has truly become a “chicken whisperer.” They were busy last summer hosting family and friends in their guest house, all the while working on our 50th Reunion committee, recruiting volunteers to help with all aspects of planning. If you want to become involved, let a committee member know—the more people involved, the more fun everyone has and the better reunion will be. * And finally, from Lucia Whittelsey: “I have only one thing to say about 2020-21: I’m grateful I have walls to climb!” * I’m looking forward to the walls coming down and being able to see friends and loved ones again.

1972

Class Correspondent:

Nancy Round Haley
[email protected]
Paul McGurren started with some sad news. On Oct. 30, 2020, John Crabtree (aka “Crab” or “Crabby”) died unexpectedly near his home in Poland, N.Y., from a heart attack. Paul and John remained good friends after Colby, taking fishing trips together for decades. On a positive note, Paul has weathered the pandemic by staying in good health with lots of walking and hiking. He even got in some winter fly fishing. His two daughters had been home in Maine but were heading back to college. “Be well, and maybe we’ll see one another at our 50th.” * Sandy Manoogian Pearce and her husband are staying safe, tucked away in their winter home in Arizona. They sit on their outdoor patio and take credit for changing Arizona to blue since changing their voting residency. She recently read Inheritance, a memoir by Dani Shapiro, “a beautifully profound book about one’s identity.” * Dee Fitzgerald Sockbeson heard from her Colby roommate Roz Johnson, who lives in California. Besides employing Covid survival techniques—such as curbside shopping—Dee and Henry ’73 got their sailboat in the water last summer and sailed on Long Island Sound. Other activities were online cooking classes with their son and stamp collecting, as Dee belongs to two stamp clubs. * David Cheever, vice chair of Maine’s Bicentennial Commission, says that Maine will attempt to commemorate its 200 years of statehood in 2021, thanks to the pandemic that interrupted almost all the plans for 2020. Colby had a significant role in driving Maine toward statehood, and the group hopes to have Colby mark that in some way during Maine’s “200-Plus-One” celebration. * Bob Brown, who taught high school social studies for 41 years in Southington, Conn., retired six years ago. He loved teaching and used his Colby philosophy major in many ways. Bob is his town’s Rotary president, chairs the state teacher’s union political action committee, is in his third term on the board of education, and started a state task force to reduce the impact of poverty on students, a passion of his. He and his wife, Gloria, have two grown kids—a son and a daughter—and five wonderful young grandkids. * Bill Earnshaw spent most of last year in his studio—a glass box built on the foundation of an old stable in the Scottish hills. He heats with a wood stove, and his internet is bounced from the Scottish hilltops by transmitters powered by wind turbines and solar batteries. He continues his work researching the mechanisms of cell division. He managed to get his Principal Research Fellowship from the Wellcome Trust renewed until October 2025. Maybe then he’ll retire, but at the moment he’s having too much fun. Bill is also working on the fourth edition of his textbook Cell Biology. His wife, Margarete Heck, is a professor at the University of Edinburgh, and their two children, Charles and Irina, are both doctors. Bill and Margaret took just one holiday—to the island of Shetland, which he highly recommends, particularly for lovers of sea birds, whales, and sea otters. He would be happy to see anyone who finds themselves in Scotland. They have a guest cottage! * Despite crossing into her 70s, Janet Holm Gerber continues to work full time as director of admission at a small private school—a job she’s loved for years. Even though challenged by the pandemic that increased an already big workload, her students (preschool-8th grade), their families, and the faculty are magnificent. Janet is now a grandmother and sees why people say there is nothing like it. * John Martland compiled old photos from his parents’ archives into a scrapbook for his grandchildren titled “Before I was Papa John” to educate them about his life before he was retired. As part of their pandemic activity, John and his wife, Janet Shreve Martland, cleaned their attic, and now John’s old boxes of treasures are organized. He looks forward to our 50th Reunion. A few years ago, Nat Smith, Jon Dyer, and John got together for lunch. They missed Dean Ridley, retired in Florida, and they’d love to hear from him! Janet has remained in touch with Louise Nurdin Sidelinger, living in Washington state, and Patri Godfrey McKinley, in Oregon, and has had visits with them on both coasts. * Take care, classmates! Wear your mask, wash your hands, get vaccinated, and stay in touch.

1971

Class Correspondent:

Ann E. Miller
[email protected]
May we all enjoy new beginnings as we move through this pandemic, which has been so tragic for so many. * Val Thibeau Yates enjoys living in Virginia Beach near her grandson. She’s hoping to be working soon for one of the big tech company’s foundations as a fundraiser for a new initiative. * Ruth Moore Barningham saw Bob ’70 and Christa McCarter Kaufman last October in Hilton Head, S.C. Ruth and her husband were anxiously awaiting their vaccinations. (Aren’t we all?) * After serving UCC churches for more than 40 years, Andrew Wilson has retired with his wife in Reedsville, Pa. His eventual goal in retirement is to wear out his rocking chair and to spend as much time as he can at their camp at Moosehead. * Fifty years later, Bill Glennon writes that “all anyone needs to know is that I’m alive and well.” He told me I could quote him on that. So, I did. * Bill Hladky continues to send me glorious photos from his wilderness area in New York with interesting commentary about geological discoveries. * Having retired from cardiology five years ago, Roger Shell and his wife live in Hillsborough, N.J., but winter in Naples, Fla. “Paradise.” He admits that it’s been easier to survive this pandemic not working. They enjoy cooking together, but they miss traveling with friends. (Don’t we all?) He looks forward to safer times when they can visit their 10 grandchildren. * Janet Beals and Dave Nelson enjoy their snowbird lifestyle, spending summers in Colorado and winters in Arizona. They own a home in Edwards, Colo., and rent a home in an adult community in Arizona. (Are we adults?) Their animals enjoy the commutes back and forth, too. They’ve felt relatively safe through this pandemic since their climates are conducive to outdoor activities. * Jacques Hermant’s experience with the pandemic in France has included a 6 p.m. curfew and police authorization necessary for exceptions; restaurants, sports clubs, ski areas being closed; mandatory masks, and big fines for failing to obey. He reports that lots of managers are working online and being paid normally while those who lost their jobs receive a state allowance of 85 percent of their previous salary. Others accept the constraints, he said. * Leslie Anderson always provides me with so much news, and I’m hard-pressed to squeeze it all in. First, they were on pins and needles waiting for the vaccine. They stay home in their tiny mini-barn in Sedgwick, Maine, keeping warm with a wood stove and a few heaters. They feel it’s safer than being in downtown Portland. Zoom has kept her connected with her Class of ’71 posse and her other posse from the Class of ’73 (Sue Feinberg Adams, Kathy O’Dell, Lois Leonard Stock, and Deborah Keyes). She met these women during her years working at Colby as the college editor (“aka my REAL Colby education!”). * As is the case with many of us, Rich Abramson looks forward to traveling again. At least he’s gotten his vaccination! * Despite a year of hardships, Bonnie Belanger Gauthier headed into this year with hope and optimism. She’s aware of how resilient we are as human beings. Her belief in social action has thrived since our days at Colby. * As for me, I’m happy with a slew of new beginnings, heaving huge sighs of relief about almost everything. It was interesting editing the submissions for our reunion yearbook to see what you have been up to for all these years. We have fascinating people and careers among our ranks. As you’ll probably know by now, we sadly need to postpone our in-person 50th Reunion because of so much uncertainty surrounding Covid-19 and vaccination protocol. However, stay tuned for virtual get-togethers!

1970

Class Correspondent:

Libby Brown Strough
[email protected]
Jeff Parness reports that granddaughter Amelia Jane joined the world in 2020, making it six grandkids, three boys and three girls. * Steve and Laura Struckhoff Cline have been babysitting their one-year-old granddaughter one day a week while her older sisters learn remotely, her mom teaches remotely, and her daddy works remotely at home. * Ruth and Mark Zaccaria haven’t really seen much change in their lifestyle. They each have worked for years from different offices. They’ve traveled by car with relative frequency to their property in New Hampshire. There, the acreage provides enormous social distancing, and the public health restrictions have been far less stringent and far more successful than those in Rhode Island. They’ve been blessed with just the right number of immediate family members in their immediate area so they never violated RI mandates on the size of private gatherings. * Led by Cheryl Dinneen Soon, a small group of Class of ’70 members created a book club under the umbrella of the Colby Book Club. They were last reading Call Me American: A Memoir by Abdi Nor Iftin. Members include Brenda Hess Jordan, Molly Carroll Mains, Linda Marsh Foss, Donna Sundeen Wheeler, Barb Skeats MacLeod, Cynthia Wallace McKee, Jane Stinchfield Sexton, Nicky Pach, Debby Hawks Kelley, and me (Libby Brown Strough). * Doug and Hazel Parker Smith report that Doug has closed his practice to direct patient care and is now rendering only telemedicine evaluations of in-patient stroke and head trauma patients. Hazel continues to manage her one-acre gardens and provides Nana-care for their two-year-old grandson, while they awaited the arrival of a granddaughter in March. Doug survived a sepsis hospitalization, only to ricochet into Covid-19. Fatigue was the worst and lingering symptom. * After three long walks (120 to 180 miles each) the past three years, Barb Skeats MacLeod had a very successful partial knee replacement in October. At two months out, she started to plan one more walk in Spain. After two years without a dog, they decided it was once again time. Welcome to Bayley, an F1B goldendoodle (mom golden retriever, dad goldendoodle). After raising their last English setter “puppy” 15 years ago, starting over with an active puppy was quite a wake-up call for them. It definitely livened up Covid times! * Katharine Wells Poland reports that they have been self-isolating since March 19, 2020. They’re fortunate to live in Maine, and in the country, so isolation isn’t difficult—it’s a way of life. While the weather was warm, they still socialized with friends by having cookouts or going for walks in the woods. Kit stays in touch with her best roomie, Leslie Seaman Zema, on a regular basis. She also stays in touch with Mary Ann Tomlinson Sullivan ’71 and Janice Goodwin Richardson ’72, so she gets input from both sides of the country, various parts of the political spectrum, and everything from town life to the Big Apple. * Bill Hardy says that 2020 was great! An uncontrolled pandemic, and wildfires and smoke in Napa ruined 70 percent of the crop of red wine grapes (including his Pinot Noir). No San Francisco opera or ballet. No visits to family. Compensating for that was time spent with Lona (Eldridge ’66) in their 53rd year of marriage and playing a lot of golf. The worst part was not getting back to their place in Maine or his law firm. * Barrett Hurwitz reports that the pandemic has practically shut down his law office since even his office building has been locked to the public since the outbreak. * Norma Rivero de Biermeyer wrote that despite the desperate conditions and shortages in Venezuela, she’s getting along by reading a lot, exercising early in the morning for her back and two artificial knees, walking every afternoon for 30 minutes, and enjoying the fresh air up on the mountain.

1960 Newsmakers

ADPi sisters in 1965. Clemence
Ravacon Mershon ’67 seated, right, in white.

In last summer’s golf club night league in Stockbridge, Mass., Starbuck “Buck” Smith ’65 was randomly paired with Jake Pinkston ’08. Donning Colby hats, Team Colby won not only all 19 matches during the regular season but the team championship for 2020. * Clemence Ravacon Mershon ’67 wrote the article “Effecting Change from Within” for the summer 2020 Adelphean magazine, chronicling the unsuccessful efforts of Colby’s Alpha Delta chapter of Alpha Delta Pi to pledge a Malawian student. Now, as an ADPi chapter advisor, Mershon has “witnessed the many women of diverse backgrounds and cultures who have led or currently lead Eta Beta at Allegheny College.” * Eddie Woodin ’69, a gardener and business owner, was recognized by Marquis Who’s Who Top Business Owners for his “dedication, achievements, and leadership in sales.” Woodin is president of Woodin and Company Store Fixtures in South Portland, Maine.

1969

Class Correspondent:

Ray Gerbi
[email protected]
Rick Frantz and wife Jennifer sold Andy’s Old Port Pub after more than 12 years on Portland’s waterfront. While an experience he would not have traded, Rick is thrilled with retirement, feeling “there is no better place than several miles offshore on a small Maine island to experience an impeachment and a pandemic.” * Marquis Who’s Who Top Business Owners recognized Eddie Woodin for his dedication, achievements, and leadership in sales, philanthropy, and community initiatives. * Thomas “Gerry” McGrath and Donna celebrated their 51st anniversary. They have two sons and two grandsons. Gerry retired after 45 years of government service, mostly with the Department of State, in foreign and civil service, living and traveling in Europe and Africa. They now split their time between northern Virginia and Michigan. Gerry has started playing piano, drawing, reading, taking online courses, doing home improvement projects, and hiking. * Peter Shearston is completing one more major project, and then he’s looking forward to retirement this summer. * Craig Stevens started 2020 teaching in person at the Savannah College of Art and Design, then taught virtually. In Maine for the summer and free of teaching and socializing, his golf game improved and his kitchen got renovated. He regrets that he couldn’t attend his grandson’s first birthday or see his children and grandchildren in over a year. “This all reminds us what’s important in life, and it’s not stuff, it’s those we love.” He started teaching the winter quarter virtually, hoping to be back in the classroom this spring. A highlight has been Curt Schneider taking him down memory lane with samples from his photo albums. Craig will be back in Camden in June and would love to hear from any Colby folks in the area. * Judy Lee Moeckel had a difficult year. Her husband died in February 2020, then her chamber and church choirs went inactive. As spring and summer arrived, her spirits lifted as she began hiking, walking, and tending her garden; however, she suffered an almost fatal infection of the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis and a heart attack, but as spring approached she said, “I feel better than I have in years.” She was looking forward to hiking, traveling, and signs of spring in her garden! * Steve Fisher found refuge from the pandemic in the White Mountains, summiting the NH 4,000-foot peaks. Now he plans to tackle the other 4,000-foot peaks in New England. * Anne York Samson and her cousins cruised the coast of Costa Rica and through the Panama Canal to Panama, where her grandfather had been in charge of pouring concrete for the canal. They visited her grandparents’ home, the hotel where her mother won a swimming race at age 6, and the hospital where her aunt was born. * Bill Burges continues to work at the Ohio consulting firm he founded 37 years ago, enjoying the transition as younger partners take the lead. He, too, is enjoying Curt Schneider’s networking. * Gary Austin has traveled more than 15,000 miles since March, delivering PPE to first responders. He fills the rest of his time reading and volunteering at a local maritime museum. He and Judy hope to travel to Norway in June. * Joy and Doug Kant regret not seeing their daughter and granddaughters since February. They hope for a summer visit. * Mickey Jako plays tennis with his “Geezer” group, and on his YouTube channel (“Confronting Believers”) he posts material on Mormonism, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Christian Science. He also posted a video of his meeting with the minister who criticized his presentation on religion at our 2009 reunion. In August he had an article published in Freethought Today called “How to Effectively Argue with Christians,” pleased that an atheist magazine was open-minded enough to print an article by a general theist like himself. * Perhaps Jane Chandler Carney summed up the best approach for 2020: “Swapped out the hide-a-bed for a Ping-Pong table. A little cardio and a lot of stretching as Owen and I retrieved wayward balls hiding behind toys and tools.”

1968

Class Correspondent:

Lynne Oakes Camp
[email protected]
Clarke and Cathie Smith Keenan started the pandemic at their condo in Santa Barbara, Calif., and then migrated in June to Vermont to their summer home, which doubles as a year-rounder. They walk daily and immerse themselves in their land and nature. Their new best sport is snowshoeing, and they also do some downhill skiing. They talk and Zoom with Gerry and Jann Semonian Czarnetzki. * Jan McGhee Adams and her husband were unable to make their annual fall trip to Europe, but they biked the Cross New Hampshire Bike Trail on six separate days from Woodsville, N.H., to Bethel, Maine. They’ve purchased microspikes to enjoy winter hiking and recently skied Cannon in the morning and micro-spiked up to Artists Bluff in Franconia, N.H., in the afternoon. Jan’s very involved with Rivier University’s senior education program called RISE, where she’s taught and taken many Zoom classes, and the CALL program at Keene State University. * Skip Fucillo and his wife, Linda, managed to return to Maine for a few weeks to welcome first granddaughter Katherine Sara Hanly. He was also able to tour Colby’s Harold Alfond Athletics and Recreation Center before the pandemic—he said it’s amazing. Skip and Linda had a small reunion with Shari and Joe Boulos in Naples, Fla., just before the pandemic struck. Also present then were Pete Frizzell and wife Linda as well as Gerry Ogus and wife Chris. The next day, everything changed and they all returned home to lockdown. Presently, Skip plays golf with Rich Habeshian, who lives in Vero Beach, and he and Linda are walking and cooking at home until the pandemic passes. * John Birkinbine and wife Sarah are still at their home in Venice, Fla. They did not make trips to visit family and friends in Maine and Wisconsin last summer due to the pandemic, but they’re looking forward to visitors in Florida soon. * Bill Palombo turned 75 in 2020, and by the end of the year had sold all three of his offshore lobster boats, ending 50 years of catching lobster in the Gulf of Maine and along the continental shelf. He still owns and operates a wholesale lobster business in Lynn, Mass., with two locations in Canada along with a partner, although they’re both in the process of exiting that business as well. He intends to continue selling bait and fish on both coasts for a while. At some point soon, he plans to sell his business to his employees and then sell his real estate in Newport, R.I., and finally retire! He invites classmates to stop by if they’re visiting Rhode Island when it’s safe to do so. * Art Brennan and his wife were self-isolating like monks until the vaccine became available. They had only limited contact with grandchildren, no gym visits, no coffee shops or restaurants, no concerts, no travel. Walks on the beach have been good for body and soul as well as exchanging emails with some classmates. He can’t wait until we can all socialize again. * Ken and Sandra High Walters are managing to stay safe, healthy, and busy. Sandra retired in 2013, leaving behind a career in data analytics, data modeling, and campaign analytics across various industries. She retired to running a small internet business curating and selling antique and vintage Oriental rugs. This business has kept them both very busy. They haven’t been able to see their four children and families, but they Zoom with them all the time. They now have five grandsons and one granddaughter. They still live in their 1928 home in Gross Point Park, Mich. * It was good to hear from all of you. Please stay safe and healthy!

1967

Class Correspondent:

Bob Gracia
[email protected]
Caroline Kresky continues to enjoy practicing law at her firm, Kresky Law, in Atlanta. She’s grateful for recent election results, including the inauguration of the first woman vice president. For those who remember Caroline, it would have been no surprise if she had achieved that distinction. * Joyce Demkowicz Henckler has decided, after 17 years, to leave Florida and return to Kittery, Maine. She and husband Don were confined to quarters for two weeks and had several tests. All is well, and they’re awaiting their inoculations. Joyce enjoys being in contact with her son Adam and daughter-in-law, Laura. Her younger son, Aaron ’03, lives in Connecticut with his wife, Mara. * Siding with Joyce is Sandy Miller, who declared she’s not moving to sunny Florida. Sandy, however, is hedging her bet and will spend half the year in Boston and the remaining time in Maryland on Antietam Creek in a house inherited from her parents. Sandy hopes to be able to visit her children soon. She continues to design fabric and knit hats and afghans.* Not everyone has decided to shun the Southland. Kurt Swenson, a native son of the Granite State, is happy to be in Vero Beach, Fla., where he explores the inner waterways on his pontoon boat. Kurt seems not to miss snowmobiles and cross-country skiing. When bathed in sun and the fragrance of fresh flowers, how they forget the call of the north.* When it comes to moving here and there, you can count on Irv Faunce to stay put in Maine. He sold his blueberry farm and purchased lakefront property in Wilton, where he intends to build a “net-zero” energy-efficient home. Irv keeps involved in community affairs as a member of the school board and the Maine Prisoner Advocacy Coalition. * Nicholas Hadgis is well and recently became grandfather of twin boys. He now has six grandchildren. * While Woody Berube lives a simple life as he keeps away from the virus, he’s also contending with treatments for skin and blood cancer. Woody’s spirits are high, and he’ll be in the battle with determination. Woody, we wish you the very best—keep us posted. * Noel and Laurie Hunt Beasely have fared well during the pandemic but miss traveling. In addition to simply loving the experience, she writes a travel blog at ridgearttravels. com. When we can again move freely, Laurie will travel to Spain and Portugal after a trip to a much more attractive spot: Maine. * Charlie and Sally Ray Bennett are used to traveling, and this year has put a crimp in their plans. They’ve been careful to avoid any out-of-family contact but find the staying home routine tedious. Sally reads a lot and keeps busy with church committees. * As some of you know, Phil Kay served in the Navy during the Viet Nam conflict. And Colby played a role in his service. Before graduation, Phil had a conversation with Coach Winkin that led Phil to apply to officer candidate school and then to active duty. Phil wrote, in part: “This brings me to these tough times. I’m well and enjoying my life in the beautiful mountains west of Denver. But as you can imagine, I feel especially patriotic. I’m proud that I defended democracy, proud that I fought for freedoms in a foreign land, and proud that I swore to defend our Constitution from enemies foreign and domestic. Colby prepared me supremely to lead men in battle, and the Navy taught me leadership, discipline, and accountability. By the time you read this, we will once again experience responsible leadership; irresponsible people will be held accountable, and the ring leader will be held the most accountable.” Phil, we thank you, sincerely, for your service. At our 50th reunion, I counted about 10 classmates who served in Viet Nam via ROTC at Colby. We thank them for their service. * Harry “Bud” Graff is also a Viet Nam veteran. He spends many lovely hours fishing off the shores of Cape Cod, but he never forgot his literary skills honed on the Hill. He recently wrote a fine book review for his club newsletter. Deb and Harry are celebrating 52 years of marriage. For this, I’m told, Deb is receiving a special award for patience and understanding.

1966

Class Correspondent:

George Cain
[email protected]
Greetings! In our day, Alfred E. Neuman’s famous question was, “What, me worry?” Not me. * Susan Footer Hummer found comic relief tuning into Bob Marley’s Crona Watch 2020! She enjoys Maine’s music scene via YouTube and reports on her investment in solar panels: only 17 more years to break even. * Peter Winstanely is well in Atlanta: staying healthy, working part time, playing golf full time. * JoAnne Rydel Ackman met up with Susan Ebinger Spencer, Deb Anglim Higgins, and Terry Saunders Lane for lunch. After an extensive risk/reward analysis, she decided to spend the winter in Florida.* Speaking of Florida, Betty and John “Daisy” Carvellas are quasi-quarantining in St. Augustine. Each day feels like he’s living a version of Groundhog Day. * Susan Turner and husband Karl spent last summer in Charleston. She continued her “recumbent trike,” hoping to hit 1,000 miles by March. * Peter Anderson reports that a group affiliated with the Colby Outing Club has maintained contact over the past half-century and has infrequent gatherings. Since Covid, they’ve been Zooming fairly regularly. They are Marty deCou Dick, Janet Meyer Throop, Steve Johnson, Cary Parsons ’65, Jerri Hamilton Bost ’65, Lynne Egbert Eggart, and Sue Turner. Reach out to any of them to join in! * Terry Saunders Lane waxed poetic quoting our youth poet laureate. * Elizabeth Peo Armstrong laments from the Pacific Northwest about being distant from kids and grandkids and the many traditions lost to Covid. * Deborah Anglim Higgins, recognizing today’s “sometimes here and other times there” Zoom/hybrid educational reality, took a leave of absence this year. She’s taken up bird watching and dreaming about putting on her traveling shoes and hitting the road. * Eric Thorson’s son Lars got married in a beautiful nuclear-family-only ceremony in the Smoky Mountains. * Elizabeth Hernberg Went summarized much of what we’re all dealing with and hoped for better times ahead. * Cookbook author Katherine McGee Wilson finished her second book/memoir, Great Spuds: A Tribute to My Roots. She and David still live in Albuquerque. * Pat Berg Currier moved from Harpswell to Brunswick last year. She’s grateful that she and her family have remained healthy. * Bill Latvis made me smile noting that his fraternity had the highest GPA all four years. He’s been a busy entrepreneur and enjoys playing the steel drums and flying his drone. * Gary Knight received a long-awaited kidney transplant and wishes us a happy and healthy 2021. * Susan Mahoney Michael enjoys keeping up with Colby friends on Facebook and the ongoing editing she does for Danish academics. She wonders what Al Mavrinac would think about today’s politics. * Anne Ruggles Gere 1) can’t wait to rebook all those canceled trips; 2) hates Zoom teaching, but loves the students; and 3) feels grateful for good health.* By now an Australian native, Peter Grabosky’s attempt at making authentic “haggis” was not a smashing success. So why did he sign off “bon appétit”?* Stu Wantman really missed the traditional Thanksgiving holiday and the canceled 11th annual Tau Delt gathering at his Berkshires home. He’s thankful for the proactive leadership of Colby’s President Greene. * Dick Ammann, living just outside of Madison, Wis., enjoys snowshoeing, the city, and rural parks. He retired as the archivist/librarian of the Wisconsin County Historical Society. * Mac Donaldson got right to the point: a) staying home, b) wearing face masks, and c) following social distancing rules. He notes that if he had to live his life over, he’d probably skip this part. * Ralph Record reports on a continuing struggle with multiple myeloma. He’s appreciative of socially distant visits and email exchanges with Colby classmates. * Friends are the family you choose, writes Dean “Dag” Williamson. He also quoted the ancient Chinese proverb, “May you live during an interesting period of history!” * Ed Mowry made it back from a ski trip to Canada just before the border closed. He looks forward to returning to work as an emergency vet when vaccinations are completed. * Ted Houghton’s three thoughts are 1) still settling into a new home, three miles from the old one, 2) his camping app continues to do well due to a deal with Garmin, and 3) his 20-year history with cancer continues to take its toll, but he’s learned to cope. * Debbie Chase checks in from Colorado, where she walks 12,000 steps a day (with that number, it must all be downhill!) and thoroughly enjoys audiobooks every step of the way. * So, did you read this far and not see your name? Who are we going to blame? Think about sending in a few words next time to let us know you survived Covid. Finally, on a personal note, I bank at a terrific local institution, Lee Bank. Its president is a Colby ’91 graduate named Chuck Leach. He’s a wonderful business executive—it makes me proud that I went to the same college as someone like him. Happy trails to you!

1965

Class Correspondent:

Dick Bankart
[email protected]
GROUNDED. We’re all stuck “in situ.” Tom and Nancy Ryen Morrione are stranded in New Mexico—they can’t visit son Douglas ’93 in Dubai or visit the Terboughs in California. They have two grandsons at Colby, so a third generation is on the Hill. * Lew Krinsky and wife Ellen are stuck in Houston. He works from a home office but plays indoor tennis three times a week. * Norm Miner reports from the 1760 house he and partner Cheryl Callahan have occupied for 40 years in Hopkinton, N.H. They’re busy restoring a nearby 1791 cape and recently “prepared about a week’s worth of meals in its brick bake oven all with one wood-fired heating.”* Our 1961 Homecoming Queen, Judy Eyges, retired seven years ago and “relishes the lack of schedule.” She lives alone in Marblehead, Mass., with her dog. She’s busy with Zooms to her three daughters and friends. She “thinks fondly of our years at Colby” and hopes we can have another reunion soon. * Stan Garnett and his wife live in a retirement community in Tampa. He has fond memories of driving Thelma Hanson to the 2010 ATO reunion in Boston when she was just shy of 100. She and husband Dick owned “Dick’s Café,” the ATO hangout on Silver Street across from Onie’s. * Tim Cleghorn’s response for news led with “Guys, have your PSA checked regularly.” Tim caught his problem early and all is now well. Tim and wife Barbara are in Pearland, Texas. He recently reread Seven Eves by Neal Stephenson. “I’m amazed how much the author got right in the book about orbital mechanics and astrophysics.”* Hey guys, Tim is not kidding! Marty Dodge reported he had a “skyrocketing” PSA count three years ago. A biopsy confirmed a stage 5 lump resolved with chemo and 38 radiation treatments. Six years ago, he uploaded his first YouTube show. Since then, “I’ve produced and uploaded 35 additional videos collectively viewed by more than 500,000.” These are “how-to” shows on topics such as chainsaw furniture making and home building in Alaska. In press is his first serious book, For the Love of Nature, a collection of essays about his nature-related adventures. It is available through Amazon. * Well, there was at least one small reunion. Ren and Pam Pierson Parziale traveled north from West Virginia to Downeast Maine to help Donna Brown Salisbury, Pat Campbell, and Ellen Mitchell Lehto celebrate birthdays. Jim Salisbury “cooked a scrumptious seafood dinner, and Ren made sure the wine glasses were full.” * Bud Marvin gets out twice a week to play golf with 15 other senior players. His other pastime is playing cribbage with Dave and Dale Rottner Hatch in Fort Myers, Fla. * Randy Antik cofounded an annual Imagine Solutions Conference in Naples, Fla. This February, there was a virtual gathering of engaged thought-leaders to hear presentations about diverse topics such as healthcare, business, and the arts. Randy reports registrations included former Colby Board Chair Joe Boulus ’68, Allen Post, and Eliot Terborgh. * Jim Foritano is writing poetry and poetic prose as an art reviewer for Boston’s Artscope magazine. He’s rereading our freshman lit assignment, The Great Gatsby. * Virginia Goddard Barnes reported the sad news of the passing of her husband, Howard, last December. She’s in Plymouth, Mass., and looks forward to “going with kids and grandies on a vacation when Covid is under control.” * Peter Ives checks in from Northampton, Mass., and enjoys this college town very much. He still plays soccer on the Smith College campus, “but no team down here is as good as our Colby teams from 1961 to 1965.” One of his favorite pastimes is doing a weekly radio show called “The Rev and Rabbi” with his local rabbi. He enjoys being with wife Jenny, four daughters, and seven grandchildren. * Moving last March from Fort Myers Beach to Venice, Fla., just before the pandemic, was John Bragg and wife Theresa. “Our four grandchildren live there and allow us to share a bubble.” * Your correspondent was enjoying a beach holiday on Curacao when word came of the closing of JFK to inbound international flights. Managed to get the last flight to Miami with a connecting flight to JFK, so I’m grounded too! Well, I’ve had both Covid shots and look forward to resuming life in early fall. Hail, Colby, Hail!

1964

Class Correspondent:

Marcia Phillips Sheldon
[email protected]
Jack Gibbons published the free e-book Human-caused Global Warming and Climate Change: A Resource for Teachers, Students and Policy Makers. It’s a 71-page primer with quotes and graphics, useful to teachers and students planning lessons or writing reports. Access it at University Science Books: uscibooks.com/gibbons. htm. * Still practicing medicine, Jim Simon obtained four patents for LED-incorporated medical devices used in surgeries. He teaches classes on aviation medical exams. A fourth grandchild is expected this summer. Jim hasn’t given up on making the world a better place, and he sends best wishes to all. * Susan Woodward published the book Turning Points: How to Wake Up, Tune into Your GPS, and Get Unstuck, available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Susan invites anyone who reads her book to leave a review/rating. She hopes classmates are staying safe and sends love to all. * Richard Larschan teaches 10-week literature courses on Zoom for the senior program at the New York City 92nd Street Y. He reviews books for the Times Higher Education and reads for personal pleasure. Richard visits grandchildren via Zoom along with occasional “masked” in-person family gatherings. * Sara Shaw Rhoades is on Zoom for meetings, social get-togethers, and family visits. She’s reading and game playing and wonders what life will be like when the pandemic is over, suggesting that it’ll be hard to get back in the swing of things.* Natalie (Furlong ’67) and Al Graceffa have spent this “crazy year” in Hilton Head, S.C. Their 10th grandchild was born in November, but due to Covid they haven’t seen him. Al misses his daily routine of “breakfast at the local diner chewing the local gossip.” Living on a golf course, they play five times a week. * Sally Berry Dixon is moving back to Kennebunk, Maine, from California. She’s a proud eighth-generation Maine pioneer! Having cared for her husband for five years, Sally’s grateful to the Veteran’s Aide and Care organization for helping her and her husband, a veteran of the Korean War.* Suzy Noyes Mague and her husband, residents of New Orleans for 50 years, enjoy birding and attending virtual church and symphony concerts. Suzy teaches English as a Second Language and hopes to vacation in Maine this summer. * For Linda Spear Elwell, the pandemic has been difficult due to age and the inability to see family and friends. They stayed home during Christmas instead of cruising with family, including five grandsons; summer vacation in Wells, Maine, was canceled. Linda reads and writes letters to friends and family who are isolated. * Involved with Georgia’s elections, Martha Schatt Abbott-Shim canvassed neighborhoods, called from a phone bank, and wrote postcards prior to the national election and for the runoff election. Martha makes Nantucket Lightship baskets to thank the leaders of the campaigns. She’s celebrating the birth of a granddaughter, who joins four young grandsons. * Jim Harris gave up daily lunches with friends; he and his wife miss dinners out, socializing, and traveling. His work with the Pacific NW Writers Association is on Zoom, and he writes book reviews for websites. Jim phones and emails friends like Dick York; he also reads and watches news and Netflix. * Joyce Arnold Kottra discovered a family-sharing activity: Linking to “StoryWorth,” Joyce answers a given question each week. Her responses are sent to her son and will be bound into two print books. She finds it exercises her memory! Joyce has completed puzzles, read countless books, and tried new recipes and new games. * Michael Cohen is owner of SellYourSportsCar.net, a high-end auto brokerage. His business of eight years sells Porsches, Ferraris, etc., throughout the country and around the world. Michael races a Mazda Miata, and he’s on the board of directors of the southeast Michigan chapter of the Porsche Club of America. * Larry Dyhrberg has a major writing project in the works. His daughters live in New England, working and attending college. The family visits together in central locations, including a picnic on an island in a river and a visit at a Lowe’s parking lot! Larry makes fewer trips to the supermarket and plays less golf. He’s in touch with Al Smith, who lives in Québec Province, Canada.* Spending the pandemic at her New Jersey beach house, Judy Milner Coche Anderson feels safe from the virus and enjoys dips in the hot tub and taking long beach walks with two Portuguese water dogs. She writes a newspaper column online and in print.

1963

Class Correspondent:

Paule French
[email protected]
As we’ve all been hunkered down, wearing our masks, and maintaining social distance, Whit Bond and Faith have not seen their daughter and her family for many months. Despite the pandemic, Whit has kept active playing golf and tennis. He’s looking forward to our 60th! * Tom Thomas is doing well “riding out the Covid time with Tina in Philadelphia.” His grandson, Henry, is a freshman at Colby. * Also doing well but missing kids and grandkids, Michael and Peggy Fuchs Singer are grateful for good health. Peggy published another book, The Courier: Death of an Illusion, a novel. Again, it deals with American Communism, but this time she had fun making up the story! * Marsha Fern Palmer Reynolds loves keeping in touch with our classmates. Her grand-niece, Zoe Appio, swimmer and scholar, will attend Colby next year. She and her family were “impressed when the swim coach and girls on the swim team got in touch with her even before her visit.” (Colby has the only Olympic size pool in Maine.) Be sure to watch for Zoe on swim team results! Marsha recommends Leadership in Turbulent Times by Doris Kearns Goodwin ’64.* Nancy (Godley ’65) and John Wilson feel fortunate to be on Deer Isle and look forward to resuming contact, other than virtual, with their children. They walk frequently, and John swims at the Y. He misses hugs and singing with others. * A collection of more than 130 hand-cut wooden (no cardboard) jigsaw puzzles has kept Joanna Buxton Gormley occupied. Her favorites are from Stave, a company founded and owned by Colby alum Steve Richardson ’61. (His brother, Tom, was in our class freshman year.) * Jo-Ann Wincze French, Dee Dee Wilson Perry, Cathy McConnell Webber, Pat Ey Ingraham, Karen Beganny Megathlin, Laurice Puglia Haines, Karen Forsland Falb, and Jeannette Fannin Regetz have formed a special group: “The Colby 8 ... although we’ve heard that some male group might also be using this name.” Their journey began 58 years ago, sharing their lives, stories, hobbies, recommendations for books and entertainment, recipes, and their differences. They’ve gathered together many times over the years. This year, they learned to Zoom, and they do so every couple of weeks. They dressed for Halloween and toasted the Inauguration. The group support has gotten them through grief and health issues and added happiness and laughter. Although they miss one of their original group members, Charis Storms Davis, who recently passed away, they feel lucky to have had her begin this adventure with them. * Byron Petrakis looks forward to seeing their daughter in Switzerland. Their son is a hospital worker in Portsmouth, N.H. Byron collaborated with his daughter to write and publish a book of poetry, Haiku Unmasked: Perspectives from the Pandemic. He walks or snowshoes every day and does online exercise classes “to keep well in body and spirit.” * Beth Turner teaches at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee and has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to write a book on African-American theater as seen through the lens of Black Masks, the publication she has been producing on Black theater for 36 years. She also received a Lifetime Achievement Award for founding and running her magazine. Beth and Ingrid Muller, roommates for two years at Colby, kept up their friendship over the decades and over the miles. Beth heard sadly that Ingrid passed away last May. Also, Colby learned recently that Jim McKinnie had passed away four years ago. * Connie Miller Manter, involved in education locally and globally, serves as advisor/coach/guide with curriculum, instruction, and assessment in a five-town school system. She included a “wicked good recipe for haddock chowdah.” The secret is “using lots of fish!” If you’d like the recipe for Boothbay Haddock Chowdah, email Connie. * May everyone be well and stay well!

1962

Class Correspondent:

Pat Farnham Russell Cole
Nancy MacKenzie Keating
[email protected]
Here are some of the ways our classmates are managing in these unusual times. * Ellie Tomlinson remembers the fear of polio when we were children. We were scared then, and we are scared now. She enjoyed newsy holiday greetings from Sandy Fullerton, Ruth Veit Hodum, Jim Johnson, and Mark Bradford, who are all doing well. Ellie enjoys Colby Magazine and was thrilled to have her book Molly’s Pal mentioned in the last issue. Because it’s self-published, Ellie must self-promote it. Make her happy and visit Amazon or a bookstore.* The renovations that Roey Carbino made to her home were delayed, but she’s enjoying them now. Covid meant canceling a trip to Marin County to celebrate Sandy Fullerton’s 80th, a performance of her choir at Carnegie Hall, and travel to Tanzania. She hosted a virtual Halloween party and a dance party with friends dancing to Spotify in their own homes. * Anne Ticknor McNeece was Zooming with Linda Nicholson Evers, Sue Keith Gray, Nancy Rowe Adams, and Judy Cronk Liberty. They’re all well and staying safe. The ladies had fun catching up, sipping some wine, and planning for next summer. * Ann Tracy enjoys connecting with old friends. She has two skinny books out. Quiet Girls 1960 has a Colby-ish story, and the other is an Aroostook County novel. Both are available on Amazon. * Brenda Wrobleski Elwell helped her grandson with online schooling. Her cancer is under control, and she hopes to accomplish her goal of visiting 100 countries and 50 states by 2022. Brenda is finishing her second book, an anecdotal story of family history and her world travels since 1940. * Brenda Lewison and husband Bill sold their home in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, and moved to a fabulous loft in an old schoolhouse. They’re awaiting completion of the apartment Bill has designed in a CCRC. Brenda is on a streak of reading Pulitzer Prize winners during this imposed quiet time and having fun doing so. * Jan Griffith is teaching online at Suffolk University Law School. Covid meant a virtual ceremony when she received a lifetime achievement award from the American Bar Association. Congratulations, Jan! * Dick Mittleman finds his life quite altered. For the first time in 30 years, they haven’t spent most of their time in Ft. Lauderdale nor made trips to Colorado to visit sons and grands. Zoom does not replace hugging and visiting family. * Pete Duggan and his wife, Mary Vance, live full time in Naples, Fla. Pete is very involved in Pelican Bay politics and is president of the Mangrove Advocacy Group, trying to protect a 530-acre mangrove forest in southwest Florida. The Duggans spend six weeks every summer in Phippsburg, Maine, enjoying the coast, lobster, and clams. Their next-door neighbors are Linda and Bruce Marshall. Pete also stays in touch with Dave Thaxter. He also reports the death of Hooper Cutler, his freshman roommate. * Nancy Mackenzie Keating has an ongoing “Zoom Saturday” with her Tri Delt sorority sisters, “which is full of laughter and tears.” Nancy also hears regularly from Judy Hoagland Bristol. * Yours truly, Pat Farnham Russell Cole, is enjoying my fourth Florida winter. I remarried last fall, and our Hampden, Maine, home is our “closet” as we divide our time between cottages on North Twin Lake, Millinocket, and Green Lake in Ellsworth. To summarize responses from many: We’re still trying to get the vaccine. Families feted many of us for the big “80.” We’re all learning how to virtually stay in touch. We are healthy. No reports of Covid-associated deaths. Stay safe, wear your mask, and try to get the vaccine. Our 60th reunion is just a short year away.

1961

Class Correspondent:

Diane Scrafton Cohen Ferreira
[email protected]
Aloha, and thanks for answering the call for news. * Sandy Arens writes that he and Dee Ann are well, “riding out this current problem and inoculated early. We hope to visit Colby to tour the new athletic facility. Our granddaughter, Abby Arens, 18, is a competition swimmer at the Omaha Olympic Trials this June and was on the Junior National Team competing in Vancouver and Prague representing the USA. She’s currently national champion in the 200m breast stroke (18 & under). Google her! Maybe some of you will watch for her!” * Mary Sawyer Bartlett went to Maine last summer and adopted a baby Corgi, named Happy, from an Amish farmer in Unity, a year after her beautiful Annie died just short of 15 years old. “She’s now seven months old and has kept me engaged and amused during these times of isolation. I visited with Jock ’62 and Debbie Lucas Williams ’62 last summer, and I received a beautiful Christmas message from Bob DiNapoli’s daughter, Julie. All cherished connections from our wonderful alma mater.” * Bob Burke and Donna were in Florida after a month on Cape Cod. They saw most of Bob’s four children and 11 grandchildren and spent Christmas with Donna’s son Michael and wife Maria and their two youngsters, Ryan, 2, and Chase, born in early December. “I still fly my plane and play duplicate bridge five days a week. I play golf once a week as my game is really bad! Donna plays five days a week and her game is great! We don’t often leave our property or socialize with friends, so we get takeout from the club or make our own meals.” * Margie Chamberlain Davis said “hi” from Saunderstown, R.I., where she’s with daughter Holly, staying home, venturing out only for appointments, and riding in the car. “I’ve slowed down a lot, but we’re hanging in there, reading and playing games on my iPhone. Best books read recently were This Tender Land and A Promised Land by Obama. I enjoy Louise Penny’s books. Her latest is All the Devils are Here. * Carole Pope has maintained her sanity by participating in webinars and Zoom sessions offered by Colby, Bowdoin, University of Maine, the Portland Press Herald, Marlboro Music Festival, Bowdoin International Music Festival, Portland Stage Company, and Maine State Music Theatre. “You get the gist. I couldn’t live without the arts and, luckily, many organizations reach out to brighten our lives. Thank goodness we have PBS because I love their news reporting and listening to Colby’s own Amy Walter ’91 and Doris Kearns Goodwin ’64.” * Sandy Nolet Quinlan writes, “Unlike every winter for the past 20 years, Dean and I stayed on Spruce Creek in Kittery this winter. So far, it’s not been frigid, nor are we snowbound. Since we knew we’d be here for the winter, we loaded our schedules with virtual activities: yoga classes, Zoom book discussions, a Great Decisions Course online, a symphony or two, several oil painting courses, even Zoom cocktail gatherings. Our biggest loss has been gathering with our families. The exceptions were several dinners held in our messy two-car garage. Little did I think when I catered in clients’ elegant homes years ago that one day I’d be serving store-bought lasagna on paper plates on Christmas Eve! I’ve always thought that one of the keys to a happy life is remaining flexible. Now I KNOW that to be true! We wish everyone a speedy and healthy end to this Covid mess. We’d love to see you at the 60th reunion!” * Elise and Henry “Hank” Sheldon moved from Chicago to Prescott, Ariz., almost three years ago. “We miss our Illinois friends, including my fraternity brother Bob Hartman ’56 and his wife, Sue. We’re loving life here, and we’ve been able to avoid the coronavirus. We look forward to receiving the vaccine so we can visit our children again. Regards to all my Colby classmates!”

1960

Class Correspondent:

Jane Holden Huerta
[email protected]
Like many of us, Steve Curley is starving for socialization! He met Eddie Marchetti, Jock Knowles, and Dick Lucier for lunch, but probably before all hell broke loose. He talks religiously with Phil Shea and Pete Cavari and they, all the guys, are hoping for a 60th in ’21! The loss of Jack Kelley hit a lot of them really hard. “He was a beautiful person, a great coach, and later a good friend.” * Dick Peterson is proud of how well Colby is doing in the pandemic. Bette and Dick are still in the bubble at Beaumont Retirement in Bryn Mawr, Pa. They escaped to Vermont in January to visit family. They hope to go to Norway to visit friends in June. * Art ’59 and Louise Robb Goldschmidt live in a retirement community in State College, Pa., and were under lockdown, staying in their apartment most of the time. They occasionally walk around the grounds. They enjoy attending services and concerts on Zoom and taking Osher Lifelong Learning courses. She’s researching her French-Canadian ancestors, the Robidous, who changed their name to Robb after they came to the U.S. because “nobody could say it and nobody could spell it.” * Maren Stoll Fischer took a group of avid travelers to Scotland. Bob and Carlene Daisy Kelleher and Lori Waugh Harris were on the trip learning about the rugged highlands and each majestic island they visited. In March 2020 Maren and Lori traveled with Road Scholar to Malta. This island is tiny but full of prehistoric settlements. They’re planning a trip to Cornwall in September—fingers crossed—and invite others to join them. * Ralph Nelson writes that fortunately, calamity breeds the creativity that gives us hope for a brighter future. Ralph and Kay live in North Carolina. Ralph attended a Zoom technical seminar and SAR meetings. He gave a short talk to a group in Maryland. He works with several SAR prospects on their lineages to Revolutionary War patriots, is a consulting editor for the NC SAR state newsletter, and has written articles. He has assembled a database on the locations and sponsors in nine states of 452 signs related to the Washington-Rochambeau National Historic Trail. He’s not bored—he’s exhausted! * Mike Silverberg sees Hank Silverman ’61 on Zoom and hears from Dick Fields, Steve Curley, and Ron Weber. Mike and his wife are very conservative about being in public. Mike still works from home; the big advantage is not driving two hours a day to his office. They had one night of Chanukah on Zoom with his daughter and her family, Lisa McMahon Myhran ’92 and her family, and Christy O’Rourke Habetz ’92 and her adorable children. Her youngest stole the show! * Ralph Galante and his family thought his wife, Jane, who has Parkinson’s, would thrive better in an assisted living facility. But on March 12, 2020, the CEO reported he had to leave because of Covid and probably couldn’t return. Ralph is so thankful he brought Jane back to their house in Centennial, Colo. They visited their place on Merrymeeting Lake in NH last summer and plan a visit this summer. * Barbara and Ronald Weber moved into LaPossada in Palm Beach Gardens Independent Living in 2020. It was a crazy year with constant lockdown since they moved in. Despite a broken hip two years ago for him and a stroke for Barbara, they’re recovering okay: speaking better and walking better. * Robert Littlefield sends greetings from Brewer, Maine. Robert and his identical twin, Ronald, commuted to Colby all four years from a dairy farm in Albion, and Robert now laments missing out on the Colby communal living experience. But he expresses his love for Colby as it prepared them both academically for careers in physics. Ronald, deceased in 2002, was a Ph.D. physicist at NASA headquarters. Robert has been married for more than 50 years and has two daughters and five wonderful grandchildren. He looked forward to spring, when the perennials in his flower gardens show signs of life and he can plant cucumbers, tomatoes, and other things. * Juan and I have been sheltering in place in Sarasota since last March. We’ve received both shots so are now slightly less conservative. Our son Jon ’95 and his family drove from New York to make Christmas very special. I continue to direct bridge games online and do customer service for a small software company.

1959

Class Correspondent:

Joanne K. Woods
[email protected]
In the middle of this pandemic, it was nice to hear from classmates. Mary Ranlett Mossman and her husband have been in Virginia for 10 years, enjoying the slightly warmer weather than Maine. They miss seeing their daughter’s family, who live two streets away, but as a teacher, her daughter is at risk of Covid, and her husband and son have had it. In September their two elderly dogs died. They found they couldn’t live without dogs so brought home two hyperactive puppies. Training them isn’t as easy as it was 14 years ago with the other dogs. They’re keeping her amused and limber. Mary’s roommate Mary Martin died last summer after a stroke. They had kept in touch all these years. * Ed Goldberg hopes that we can have another reunion soon. Meanwhile, Ed resides in Bozeman, Mont. He remains active in business and is a part-owner of one of Montana’s iconic saloons. His travel plans have been suspended, but he has tentative plans to revisit Bhutan and Vietnam. * Corinne “Tink” Batchelder Weeks is grateful for family close by who bring her groceries, etc. Even though she longs to give them a hug, it helps with patience! She’s actually accomplishing downsizing, but she thinks it keeps her from the ever-present housework that needs to be done. * Bruce Montgomery finds it hard to believe it’s been 25 years since he moved from the suburbs of NYC to the suburbs of Denver, 25 years since he wore a suit and tie. Yes, Colorado is casual. Christmas was not the same this year. Because of the pandemic, he didn’t do any in-store shopping or go to the mall to see the decorations. He also missed driving to the mountain towns to see the festivities. Because of the “stay-at-home order,” he’s done a lot of reading: some contemporary and some classics. From what he reads, Waterville is changing. Because of age and travel distance, he doubts if he will make it back. * Lydia Katz Pease and her family fled Nazi-occupied Austria in 1938. Recently, the Austrian government decided to open up citizenship to the descendants of families who had to flee persecution. Her oldest son, Eric, working from home during the pandemic, found time to search for the documents needed to verify and legitimize their claims for himself, his two brothers, and Lydia. He’s been granted citizenship and is now applying for an EU passport. Lydia and her other sons will soon submit their paperwork as well. Eric’s wife has Italian roots and is doing a search to claim Italian citizenship. One son is married to a Chinese woman who has Taiwan citizenship. Lydia has had to cancel a hiking trip to Japan and a family outing to Provence. Since she’s been stuck at home, she finds that using Duolingo to refresh her French has kept her sane. * Louise (Robb ’60) and Arthur Goldschmidt live in a beautiful retirement community but can’t visit their neighbors’ cottages or apartments. Arthur shops for food at 7 a.m. and makes phone calls to stay connected with friends and relatives. * Russ Longley flew U.S. Navy F8 Crusader carrier-based jet fighters, then flew 30 years for TWA. For almost 20 years, he’s been consulting for a Canadian aerospace company and representing its avionics products to U.S. airlines and military aviation. At 83 he’s still into competitive ballroom dancing and working out, and he’s just started trapshooting. * Like most, I’m sticking pretty close to home but doing a lot of walking. My roommate, Helen Moore, passed away in November. We lived close to each other and met often for lunch or dinner. Helen introduced me to line dancing in recent years.

1958

Class Correspondent:

Mary Ellen Chase Bridge
[email protected]
This news was gathered when we were all dealing with Covid-19. I hope by the time you read it we’ll be free to get together with family and friends and back to something approaching the old “normal.” Too early to project what the new normal will be like. * Jane Gibbons, who usually spends five months in Sweden, decided to spend the winter in her drafty 1828 farmhouse. She greatly enjoyed the freedom Maine affords, opposed to a very restricted life in a retirement community near Covid-infected Los Angeles. “I can get out into the woods, entertain myself with Zoom meetings for a book group and a storytelling workshop through the library in Lovell, and teach Sunday school children in California on Zoom.” She also helped recapture the Senate with Georgia’s run-off election. “Playing Scrabble online and watching Netflix and Kanopy leave no time for loneliness.” * Bruce Blanchard passes on this sad news about John Edes: John passed away in March 2020, and we regret not knowing this earlier. The two shared many special experiences over the years, including traveling to Colorado in 1956 to accept the Fraternity of the Year Award at the National Convention of Lambda Chi Alpha and playing golf together. Their friendship stayed strong until the end, as Bruce talked to him at the hospital two days before he died. “John was inducted into the Maine and the New England Hall of Fame for basketball and lived his adult life in Rhode Island, working for New England Telephone & Telegraph, plus the Vermont Life Insurance Company. He was a good, loyal friend, and I indeed valued his friendship.” * From Ruth Winterbottom Peacock: “Waterville is a long way from Colima, Mexico, where my husband, Von, and I have lived for the past twenty years. Our usual flock of wintering painted buntings show up daily at our grain feeders. Come spring, they fly back to the southeastern states to breed, the males going first to build a nest and the females and ‘youngsters’ following. They don’t get caught up with walls or border control matters.” Ruth has been involved with Chinese writers, history, art, geography, politics, and the Colby readers group, enjoying Half of a Yellow Sun and The Vanishing Half. Love her sign-off: “I’m missing a few screws, but looking for them keeps me out of trouble.” * Kay (German ’59) and Al Dean were lucky to return from a Caribbean cruise early in 2020, just before the airports shut down. Al enjoys Zoom meetings with Tau Delta Phi brothers Marty Burger (CT), Bob Saltz (AZ), David Rhodes (CO), and Peter Doran (ME), as well as still being a jazz DJ at 90.5 in Worcester. The couple has stayed in their house of 58 years in Leominster, Mass., enjoying Grub Hub. Grandchildren are all doing well in school and college, and their “ESPN son, Phil, was appointed to Monday Night Football, a high honor in his field.” * Since Al submitted his news, we have received word that Bob Saltz passed away March 8, 2021. His obituary is in this issue of Colby Magazine. * Marty Burger also mentions their Zoom meetings, “a great way to stay in touch and keep current with our lives and families.” He’s still a risk management consultant for Marsh & McLennan Agency, working remotely since March 2020 with no desire to retire. Remember several years ago Marty said he had to keep working because his wife said he couldn’t be home for lunch? * Peter Doran and Lois notice how many people “from away” are buying homes in Maine (same in Vermont). They’re happy all their immediate family members are there, too, in various capacities: studying for a master’s in social work, serving in the Air National Guard, coordinating a literacy program, directing the Loggers’ Association, working for the taxation division, raising capital at Jackson Laboratory. Having officiated track and field for more than 50 years, the couple established two annual awards for the outstanding track and field woman and man at both Colby and Bates.

1957

Class Correspondent:

Don Tracy
classnew[email protected]
Many of us are living active lives, despite being in our mid-80s. Enjoy this latest, edited news from old friends. * Ron Rasmussen ([email protected]) had five radiation treatments last June, which silenced his prostate cancer. “I’m turning a robust 86; yet I feel young with my son, his wife, and their daughter, 5, living with me.” * Larry Collins ([email protected] aol.com) wrote from his winter home in Naples, Fla., where he’s trying to improve his golf game. He spends summers in West Falmouth, Mass., where he sails beetle cats and Herreshoffs. He left Colby after two years, spent three years at Boston University, then four in the U.S. Navy. He was discharged as an LT-JG, which allowed him to earn an M.B.A. at Babson College, entering the investment business. He and his family lived in Lincoln, Mass., for 30 years before taking early retirement to Cape Cod. He has a son and a daughter. Ellie Gray Gatenby ([email protected]), one of the seven Ellies from the Class of 1957, is still kicking! Her husband of 63 years, Art, is well and still working in their company. They have plenty of time to golf in Vero Beach, Fla., where they belong to the Indian River Golf Club. They’re grateful for Zoom allowing them to at least “see” and chat with their scattered family members. * John Conkling ([email protected]) and Nancy have been skiing at Ragged Mountain and at Bretton Woods. They stay at their camp on Squam Lake all summer. Three sons are close by to help, and an ex-daughter-in-law, a doctor, also lives nearby. When the virus is over, they plan to take short trips in their ’89 VW camper, including to Waterville and Colby. * Wendy Dorman McIntosh ([email protected]) is a nature photographer who takes several photo workshops and tours every year. However, with Covid-19 the last photo trip was to County Mayo, Ireland, in March 2020. She returned home on the last plane out of Shannon. “The rest of the year I’ve been catching up with projects in the garden and home. Hopefully, after getting the vaccine, I can plan trips to Arizona, Texas, Alaska, Greenland, and Norway.” * Bev (Jackson ’60) and Tony Glockler ([email protected]) have lived in a continuing care retirement community for five years near Princeton, N.J., moving all of a half-mile from the home they lived in for over 50 years. “We love it. They have taken good care of us during the pandemic, bringing dinners to our door. At year-end, we visited our daughter Alison ’90 in Pittsburgh for 10 days.” * Bob Pettegrew ([email protected] com) is still fully engaged in running capital campaigns and providing board organization assistance for nonprofits. “Hope and I just celebrated our 60th anniversary, and we’re blessed to share our lives with two wonderful daughters, their husbands, and five remarkable grandsons.” * For Mikki Chomicz Manno ([email protected] com), her two years at Colby were special because of voice lessons she took from her psychology professor’s wife, Louise Colgan, changing her initial pre-med plans and thus her life’s interest. Recently, she moved from the Northeast to be near her family in North Carolina and participate in her grandchildren’s activities. A music scholarship competition she’s chaired since 2000 holds preliminary auditions online, which works well for her. Google Suburban Music Study Club of NJ (the Grace Gimbel Scholarship Competition) to learn more. * Dick and Marilyn Perkins Canton ([email protected]) have been in Naples, Fla., since 1992. They spend summers on Cape Cod and in Naples, Maine. Their activities are golf (they’re members of the Royal Poinciana Golf Club), walking, and good socializing. “Since graduation, we’ve had business moves from Boston, then DC to California, Cleveland, NYC, and back to Boston, always keeping in touch with Colby folks in each area.” * Rose Stinson Zuckerman Ebsworth ([email protected] gmail.com ) doesn’t have much news from Deer Isle, Maine. She’s reading in her “comfy chair” (with an electric blanket) and following with interest news from Colby. & Patricia Martin Maloney and her daughter, Katrina, are working on the second volume of their book Dearest Ones at Home. The books are edited letters of her great aunt’s experiences in Russia during the Russian Revolution, 1917-19. The first volume was published several years ago, and this one is coming out in 2022. “I hope you might enjoy them.” * In a world filled with bad news, I’ve enjoyed this good news from classmates. Thank you! We still enjoy help from our six kids, along with their spouses

1956

Class Correspondent:

Charlene Roberts Riordan
[email protected]
A mild Maine winter allowed Kathleen McConaughy Zambello to take walks almost every day. The town beach, when the tide is right, has been a great venue for family get-togethers. “These shall never again be taken for granted.” * Since the pandemic, Barbara “BJ” Davis Howard has enjoyed Zooming weekly with her art group, playing her piano, and reading. Her husband, Bob, passed away in 2017, but her eldest daughter lives with her. The other two daughters are twins, and one (an attorney) lives in LA, while the other one (about to graduate from medical school) is in Virginia. BJ follows the activities of her eight grandchildren, who live in various states. * Bill Haggett and wife Sally are cooped up home in West Bath, yet they feel Iike they’re being in jail in paradise: great dog, outside areas needing care, walking opportunities, stimulating news to digest. They stay involved supporting worthwhile area organizations, including a family of two adults and four children from Burkina Faso seeking asylum in the U.S. Eighteen months ago, Bill gave up full-time work and misses the business world, but “it was time.” They keep in touch with the Vollmers and the Van Allens, who are all well. * Rosemary Crouthamel Sortor stays as occupied and connected as she possibly can by walking almost daily with friends and with meetings on Zoom. Rosie is regularly in touch with Chris Layer Larson, Barbara Nardozzi Saxon, and Lyn Brooks Wey. Trips to Maine and Darien, Conn., are not in her current plans. However, she sees her two-year-old great-grandchildren, who live in Boston. * Don Rice and wife Sherry, married for 36 years, have a combined family of eight children, eight grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren, most of whom live in New England. Four years ago, they sold their home on Lake Sunapee, N.H., after 25 years of enjoying summers of boating, fishing, and jumping off the dock. It was great watching their grandchildren grow up on this beautiful, clear lake. Then, they downsized to a condo in New London, N.H., where they’ve made wonderful friends. Three years ago, they sold their winter home in South Carolina. “May this new year bring the vaccine and a hope for a healthy new beginning of comfort and peace.” * Over these pandemic months, Brian Stompe has shared photos, stories, and a great video. Memories, depicting growing up in times of a simpler life, of relative peace, fewer worries, and neighborhood kids playing together and having such fun. Wonderful times. * We have all taken “our hits” during this time, but “We Shall Survive.” I miss New York City—the Met opera, Met museum, Broadway, the botanical garden, the Bronx, and local lectures and concerts. Take care, friends!


1955

Class Correspondent:

Betty Harris Smith
[email protected]
John Dutton checked in once again. The pandemic has left him and Jane with a lot of unusual time on their hands. “I’ve used it to catch up on personal affairs and muse over many fond memories. I think of the great education and experiences made at Colby. We beat Bowdoin our senior year in football during a poor record, but a win over the Polar Bears always meant a successful season. I reminisce over an instrument approach/landing in near-zero weather conditions during my Air Force career. I remember my efforts at introducing my wife to pristine Maine at an island resort in Jackman. And finally, I think deeply about the lifelong friends made a Colby and how they have influenced my life.”


1954

Class Correspondent:

Art Eddy
[email protected]
Ned Shenton writes, “No snow, bare grounds, open winter, full graveyard,” as they say in Cutler, Maine, where he used to live. * Robert “Whitey” Thurston, having become a resident of Englewood, Fla., to be near his daughter, says his best news is that “I spend summers in Maine.” Racquet sports and golf are still available, even though the clubhouse has been closed since last April. Not having his 13 grandchildren able to visit has been the worst impact of the coronavirus. * For Carol Dyer Wauters, cross-country skiing has replaced downhill. She’s taken up breadmaking and found it to be no easy task. She’s still trying for the perfect loaf. * Carole Bullock Adams recently welcomed a great-grandson, Austin. Carol, who has written a personal biography for her family, never expected to be a missionary, so has learned “Never say ‘no’ to God.” * Robert Anderson’s strong faith is helping him to deal with an ongoing battle with Parkinson’s disease. He and his wife, Sally, enjoy Colby Magazine, as do many others. * Bill and Mary Mastin Campbell live in a retirement community in North Andover, Mass. Mary had two careers: first as an occupational therapist, then as an assistant to folks with cerebral palsy. “My husband (who is much more interesting than am I) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology of Medicine in 2015.” * After a stint as a pilot instructor, Don Grout returned to his passion: geology. After taking a course at Cornell, Don became a Master Gardener, which he defines as “one who helps people preserve the environment and strives to become a better person.” He lives in Lake Placid, N.Y., to be close to family. * Christine Henderson Harper lives in a retirement community in Toronto, Canada, and continues to work for the family company. In her free time, she knits and reads. She’s very proud of the advances that Colby has made. * Virginia Kane Hawrylycz spends much of her free time knitting, reading, and playing cards with a small group of friends. Her sparsely populated county in Maine has been minimally impacted by Covid-19. * Susan (Miller ’56) and Tom Hunt moved back to Maine and live in a retirement center in Topsham. Tom’s daily routine consists of prayer, reading a psalm, meditating, and playing classical music on the piano, which he “picked up in his 70s.” * Tony and Marlene Hurd Jabar have made Florida their home. * Sue Johnson has found joy following the lives of three grandchildren. She receives great comfort in her personal life through meditation and daily prayer. * John Krusell has discovered that constant activity makes time fly, so he’s never bored. He recalls helping to build the Colby ski jump, and then, with Tom Hunt, soaring off into the “wild blue yonder.” * Mary Pilon Obery lives in the same retirement community as the Hunts. She finds it comforting to be surrounded by lifelong friends. * Jim Rapaport indicates that all is well and that his wife, Wendy, continues to be an active clinical psychologist and author. * Sherman Saperstein splits his time between Arizona and Chestnut Hill, Mass. He’s one of several classmates who hailed from Waterville. * Jan Stevenson Squier reports from Boise, Idaho, that her dad was one of the landscape architects who helped design parts of the Colby campus on Mayflower Hill. She recalls, with great fondness, classes with “Monsieur Biron” and her music lesson at the college. Teaching in China with her husband, Chuck, was a most significant experience in her life. * Helen Cross Stabler reminds us that we’re “old, old, old.” She’s constantly distracted by jigsaw puzzles as she attempts to clean out years of accumulated junk. Helen, who taught preschoolers for a quarter-century, wrote one of the first children’s books about Martin Luther King. * Diane Chamberlain Starcher is guided by her faith, so she prays for a time when our country will once again be guided by love and peace. She’s most grateful for “our children’s devotion to us.” * Dave and Betsy Powley Wallingford continue to enjoy life in their new home in Sudbury, Mass. * It’s time for yours truly to hang up my pen as your correspondent. It’s been a great run that I have thoroughly enjoyed. Vic Scalise has agreed to take my place. I hope to see you all in 2024 at our 70th reunion!


1953

Class Correspondent:

Barbara Easterbrooks Mailey
[email protected]
A little news made it through during these Covid times. * John Lee says that Art Eddy ’54 has been of great support to him and his daughter, Wendy, who just retired from the Defense Intelligence Agency. John is now an expert at falling after his hip replacement. * Loretta “Tommi” Thompson Staples says she’s so sorry to hear of classmates taking falls. However, she’s getting out for necessities during the pandemic. She enjoys her own company, follows politics, spends time reading and knitting complicated designs, and is coming along with “Covid cleaning” (getting rid of stuff). * Bob Grodberg wrote a long note he’s thought about sending for the past 68 years since we graduated. He thought now was the best time to bring us up to date. “I graduated from Boston University School of Law in 1956 with Colby classmates Nick Sarris, Jeff Smith, and Ken Hart ’51. I continue to practice law, primarily estate planning, and enjoy it. I’ve married twice— the first ended in divorce, but I consider it successful as I have three wonderful children, two of whom are successful attorneys. My first wife, Ronda Goodman Grodberg, grew up in Bangor, Maine, and graduated Brandeis University in its first full class, freshmen through seniors. My second wife, Dorothy Fenn Grodberg, and I both grew up in Brookline, Mass., and both graduated from Brookline High School. Dottie and her first husband (unfortunately deceased earlier than he should have) had two daughters, one of whom, tragically, was on the first plane to hit the tower on 9/11, leaving two wonderful daughters. Those girls, along with my biological grandson and Dottie’s older daughter’s sons, have given us great joy as we’ve watched them make their way during and after completion of their schooling. Dottie and I live in a very comfortable apartment (legal structure is a cooperative) on the 14th floor in Jamaica Plain, Mass., with lovely views. It’s a community containing incredibly talented people, and it’s a delightful place to live. I thought that having to give up my three-times-a-week, 50-year tennis game would be a major problem, but interestingly, when that occurred last year it hasn’t been a problem.” Thank you, Bob, for sharing. Please, follow his lead and send me a note anytime!


1952

Class Correspondent:

Art White
[email protected]
Dave Morse writes: “With some reluctance, we’re leaving Maine after 30 years and moving back to Northampton, Mass., to be closer to family. We’re moving into a nice house when many our age may be enjoying an assisted living situation. We feel fortunate we can fit in one more date with United Van Lines, masks and social distancing understood. We look forward to the time we can visit Colby again.” * Louise Ginsberg Hirshberg writes: “My goodness, how many days is it since our Colby days … and still we go on. This summer I moved to a CCR Riverwoods in Exeter, N.H., and while I’m in a retirement community, I try to keep busy, social distancing, of course. I still play tennis, am addicted to Pickle Ball, cross-country ski, volunteer at CASA, and try to keep smiling in this sad year of the pandemic. Reading lots and walking miles. I had a nice ‘drive-by’ 90th birthday last June, as I’m sure many of my classmates have had.” (Good grief, Louise! I’m worn out just reading of all your activities.) * Ellen Lewis Huff writes that 2020 was not a good year for her, and 2021 started out rough. Last year she had a stroke, which prevents her from playing her violin. This is a big deal for her as she was part of a quartet that played for their own pleasure and for the pleasure of others. In January Ellen lost her husband of 66 years to Covid-19. She continues to adjust to living alone in her own home. Ellen keeps busy with exercise therapy and lots of reading. She hopes the next year is happier for all of us. * I may have missed an earlier message from Al Lamont, for which I apologize. He wrote: “Joan (Martin) and I are now residents of Stuart, Fla. We left our beloved New London, N.H., and Lake Sunapee with boating, golfing, tennis, and bocce. Our son Gary ’78 had our only granddaughter married in Malibu, Calif., in August 2019. We were thrilled to attend. We keep in touch with my roommate George Pirie ’53. He was my best man, and I was his. He’s a retired Navy captain and oral surgeon. He keeps me updated on Ed Fraktman ’53 and Nelson Beveridge ’53. We spent 60 wonderful years with our closest friends, Mark ’51 and Eddi Miller Mordecai, living very close together in Wayland, Mass., and New London. I recently received an email from Charlie Tobin ’51. He’s doing excellent and looks great. Joan was in a wonderful group of classmates who wrote a ‘round robin’ letter; Betsy Fisher Caldwell, Janice Vaughn Crump, Nancy Nelson Cedrone, Mary Sargent Swift, and Els Warendorf Hulm ’51. Five Colby women married Colby men: Joan Kelby Connell [Bob ’51], Jan Leslie Douglass [John], Joan Martin Lamont [Al], Eddi Miller Mordecai [Mark ’51], and Bev Baker Verrengia [Dick]. Their letters reflected on reasons for our lives for 60 years: weddings, careers, children, and grandchildren. We get together almost annually.” * It pleases me that Al and Joan have kept in contact with so many of our classmates and Colby friends. I’ve lost touch with too many of those who were once a large part of my life. I still see Bob Kline frequently and talk by phone with Lum Lebhertz. It has been some time since I’ve talked with Herb Nagle, and I miss that. Thanks to everyone who wrote in. Stay safe!


1951

Class Correspondent:

Fred Boyle
[email protected]
First, let’s sing the praises of Chet Harrington, who wrote this column for many years. Let’s celebrate his life, accomplishments, love of Colby, and his ’51 classmates. Taking over the job, I realize that few of you may remember me. I was a naïve 17-year-old when I arrived on Mayflower Hill (and downtown at Butler), only to grow up on campus. I even became one of those liberals that President Bixler said that we would become when he greeted us at Lorimer Chapel in the fall of ’47. At 90, I’m hiding out in Springvale, Maine, writing this column, working on my 10th book of genealogy, Early Families of Buxton, Maine, rehearsing for a Valentine’s Zoom show, and getting ready to teach a course on Zoom for York County Senior College—The Rest of the Story (America from the 1930s to near the present). Thank God for Zoom and that some of us are still around. * Bob Belyea writes: “After finishing basic training, I was stationed in Germany until I was released in 1953 and discharged in 1959 (honorable). Got married in 1954 and found a job in Maine for about 15 years. I then moved to Carlisle, Pa., and went to work for Dickinson College as controller. Retired in 1992 as associate treasurer. My wife and I have done a lot of traveling both in the USA and Canada with our trailer, plus overseas journeys, too.” * Dick Birch writes: “This is the first winter in 25 years that we have not gone to Florida. Still are awaiting our vaccinations. We are at the Huntington at Nashua, an active senior living community in Nashua, N.H. Highly recommend it.” * Al Stone writes: “As I approach 93 years of age, I’m surprised to be still alive and healthy and equally surprised to hear of your action plan as our new class correspondent. I live in Groton, Mass. So far, the pandemic has not limited life, except that I no longer travel. I do, however, still go to the office at Sterilite every day and try not to bother anyone. With 14 grandchildren, five of whom graduated from Colby, I receive a great deal of oversight and have a busy life.” * Hope to hear from more of you!


1949

Class Correspondent:

Anne Hagar Eustis
[email protected]
Whee!! I have some news to share with you—something more interesting than Covid-19. * Shirlee Rubin Ezmirly writes that two years after graduating from Colby, she “joined the Women’s Medical Corps in the Air Force and served my time during the Korean Conflict (War).” In 1979 she and her husband bought an old apartment building in Key West, Fla., which had been a hospital from the early 1900s and closed as such in 1916. Upon exploring the attic accessed by a ladder, they found old medical records scattered all over, including one for Upton Sinclair, author of The Jungle, which they framed. She attributes her 93 years young to a daily walk. “I walk briskly for 2 ½ miles, which makes me feel good.” She also sticks with a vegetarian diet, and to get to her sanctuary on the third floor, she has to climb 34 steps! Good for you, Shirlee. Keep it up! * Well, we’re all still more or less hunkered down trying to avoid Covid-19. However, things are looking up with vaccinations in process. Please keep the news coming.

1948

Class Correspondent:

David Marson
[email protected]
Katharine Weisman Jaffe wrote from Florida, where she and husband Mike are “comparatively healthy and vaccinated once against the damn pandemic.” They have three children and their spouses, who live in New Jersey, North Carolina, and near them in Florida. There are also eight grandchildren and their spouses plus 13 great-grandchildren: seven girls and six boys, “all smart and beautiful. Mike and I daily express our gratitude for our blessings and luck. We wish the same to all.” * Sid McKeen ’49 sent a note about the death of his wife, Anne Fraser Baer McKeen, who passed away Oct. 22, 2020, in Punta Gorda, Fla. “We were married in 2002, after the deaths of our first spouses. Having not seen each other in 53 years, we met again and married,” Sid wrote. He’s now living in Vermont with his daughter and family. * Carol Stoll Baker has two great-grandsons living relatively close by, in Darien, Conn. “What a joy!” During the pandemic, she’s taken virtual exercise and watercolor painting courses, plus she’s done a lot of reading: the New York Times, Boston Globe, and books. She even has a monthly book club meeting. * Because of the virus, I spent the winter in Dedham, Mass., instead of in Jupiter, Fla. It was my first winter in Massachusetts since about 2000, so I hadn’t seen snow in almost 20 years. I don’t miss it!