Talks (unless otherwise indicated) are in Davis 301 from 4–5 PM on Mondays. Refreshments begin at 3:30 on the second floor of Davis.

To make sure you get email updates, add yourself to the mathstu (if a student) or mathothers (if not) email groups. Or check the Colby Math&Stats facebook page.

You can see next semester’s schedule.

Friday, March 5, 3:30 pm Eastern Time

Zoom Meeting ID: 988 1157 0414
Passcode: 389705

Dr. Lauren Rose
Bard College
Ready, SET®, Go!

Title

Abstract

The popular card game SET® has been studied extensively by
mathematicians, and has been the topic of PhD theses, research
articles and books. We will start by introducing the game, describe
some of the mathematics underlying this game, and then show how it
connects to a current unsolved problem in mathematics. We will also
introduce a related game, QUADS, which is currently being studied by
Dr. Rose and her students.

 

Friday, March 12, 3:30 pm Eastern Time

https://colby.zoom.us/j/93518592504?pwd=aXBGbHZObm5URkJLaXlTTThmNHBWZz09

Dan Merkle
Executive Director of Elections at ABC News
Surveying Voters on Election Day:
How Exit Polls Are Conducted and Used by the Media

Title

Abstract

Exit polls play an important role in the media’s coverage of elections by providing accurate and timely data that help us report on the two main stories of any election: Who won, and what does it mean? My presentation will start with a brief history of exit polling and an overview of how exit polls are used on election night. Then I will discuss methodological issues in exit polling including sampling, questionnaire design, noncoverage, nonresponse and weighting. I will conclude by discussing the challenges posed by COVID-19 and changes made to the exit polling procedure for the 2020 election

 

Friday, May 7, 3:30 pm Eastern Time
Ayomikun Adeniran
Pomona College

Meeting ID: 950 4995 9347
Passcode: 191359
Click to join:

 

Parking Cars on a One-way Street

Title

Abstract

The classical parking problem asks for all sequences of length n that allow n cars to park on a one-way street without any of the cars having to exit the street. It is well known that parking functions are the unique solution to this problem. Parking functions first arose from the concept of storage in computer science and are very central in enumerative and algebraic combinatorics. In this talk, we will look at some recent variations and generalizations of the parking problem, and highlight some recent results in this regard.

 

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