Colby College is pleased to announce its February events. All are free (except where noted) and open to the public.

Thursday, February 3, 7 p.m.
The George E. Murray Debate Society
Whitney Room, Roberts Building
In these weekly, parliamentary-style debates, the teams do not know the topic until ten minutes before the debate starts. After each debate, members of the audience are invited to speak on the topic. A prize of $25 is awarded for the best of those speeches. Refreshments are served.
Contact: Professor David Mills, 859-5275, dhmills@colby.edu

Friday, February 4, 1 p.m.
Philosophy Colloquium with Professor Eric Buck of the University of Kentucky
Room 215, Lovejoy Building
Contact: Grace Von Tobel, 872-3416, gkvontob@colby.edu

Friday, February 4, 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, February 5, 12:30 p.m.
Colby Dance Theater: Millions of Cats
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
An original adaptation for the stage of children’s author and illustrator Wanda Gág’s timeless story.
Tickets: $2 with Colby I.D. and for seniors; $3 general admission. Box office open Monday through Saturday during the week of the performance from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Contact: Deborah Ward, 872-3388, djward@colby.edu

Monday, February 7, 4 p.m.

Philosophy Colloquium
“Daoism, Heidegger, and Ecology”
with Professor Eric Nelson, University of Toledo, Ohio
Room 215, Lovejoy Building
Contact: Grace Von Tobel, 872-3416, gkvontob@colby.edu

Tuesday, February 8, 7 p.m.
Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium
“Ocean Sprawl, Ecosystem-based Management, and Our Ocean’s Future”

Room 1, Olin Science Center
Ocean sprawl threatens the ecology of our fragile marine ecosystem. Rapid advances in technology, population, and international trade have led to substantial increases in our demands on marine resource systems. Traditional activities like fishing, shipping, and recreation now take place in the same waters that are being asked to host liquefied natural gas facilities, wind energy farms, mariculture, fiber optic cables, and gas pipelines. Roger Fleming from the Conservation Law Foundation will discuss how New England needs a coordinated management system to promote environmentally sound development of our ocean.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 872-3782, bkkopp@colby.edu

Tuesday, February 8, 8 p.m.
Japanese Taiko Recital
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Building
Taiko is a dynamic combination of movement, drumming, and voice from Japan. This taiko drum concert is by members of the Burlington Taiko Group and Colby’s Jan Plan taiko participants.
Contact: Professor Tamae Prindle, 872-3176, tkprindl@colby.edu

Wednesday, February 9, 5 p.m.
“Gender, Race, and the American Experience: How does American culture affect the lives of Brazilian Women?”
Pugh Center Commons, Cotter Union
A presentation of junior Christina Terrell’s Jan Plan independent study, including an exhibition of the photos taken during the project.
Contact: Christina Terrell ’06, cterrell@colby.edu

Wednesday, February 9, 6:30 p.m.

Black Intellectualism: Our Experiences and Our Voices
Room 100, Lovejoy Building
Contact: Student Organization for Black and Hispanic Unity, 872-6339, amolaghe@colby.edu

Thursday, February 10, 4 p.m.
Philosophy Colloquium
“Gestalt Ontology and the Task of Deep Ecology”
with Professor Chris Diehm of Villanova University
Room 215, Lovejoy Building
Contact: Grace Von Tobel, 872-3416, gkvontob@colby.edu

Thursday, February 10, 4 p.m.
Chinese New Year Celebration
Pugh Center Commons, Cotter Union
Contact: Dept. of East Asian Studies, 859-4402, kabesio@colby.edu

Thursday, February 10, 7 p.m.
The George E. Murray Debate Society
Whitney Room, Roberts Building
In these weekly, parliamentary-style debates, the teams do not know the topic until ten minutes before the debate starts. After each debate, members of the audience are invited to speak on the topic. A prize of $25 is awarded for the best of those speeches. Refreshments are served.
Contact: Professor David Mills, 859-5275, dhmills@colby.edu

Thursday, February 10, 7 p.m.
STS Spring 2005 Lecture Series

“Science, Race, and Identity”
with Professor Kenneth Manning of Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Room 1, Olin Science Center
Contact: Professor Paul Josephson, 872-3193, prjoseph@colby.edu

Saturday, February 12, 7:30 p.m.
Portland String Quartet
Lorimer Chapel
Stephen Kecskemethy, violin; Ronald Lantz, violin; Julia Adams, viola; Paul Ross, ’cello
The quartet will open the second half of the concert season with a program of works by Charles Ives, Ludwig van Beethoven, and Colby Professor of Music Emeritus Peter R&#00e9;.
Contact: Diane Kadyk, 872-3236, dlkadyk@colby.edu

Tuesday, February 15, 4 p.m.
Philosophy Colloquium
“Why Philosophy of Science Needs Hegel?” with Professor Abraham Stone of the University of Chicago
Room 215, Lovejoy Building
Contact: Grace Von Tobel, 872-3416, gkvontob@colby.edu

Thursday, February 17, 7 p.m.
The George E. Murray Debate Society
Whitney Room, Roberts Building
In these weekly, parliamentary-style debates, the teams do not know the topic until ten minutes before the debate starts. After each debate, members of the audience are invited to speak on the topic. A prize of $25 is awarded for the best of those speeches. Refreshments are served.
Contact: Professor David Mills, 859-5275, dhmills@colby.edu

Sunday, February 20, 3 p.m.
American Virtuosity
Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Building
Eric Thomas, clarinet; Juliette Kang, violin; Cheryl Tschanz, piano
Works by American virtuosic composers include Paul Schoenfield’s Trio for Clarinet, Violin and Piano, Leonard Bernstein’s Clarinet Sonata, Joan Tower’s Harbor Lights, William Grant Still’s Romance for Alto Saxophone and Piano, and premieres by Emily Wong and Eric Thomas. Juliette Kang, assistant concertmaster of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, will make a guest performance.
Contact: Diane Kadyk, 872-3236, dlkadyk@colby.edu

Tuesday, February 22, 7 p.m.

Visiting Writers Series: Adrian Blevins
Robins Room, Roberts Building
Colby’s newest creative writing professor is award-winning poet Adrian Blevins, whose first full-length collection of poetry, The Brass Girl Brouhaha, won the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. Blevins is also the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writers’ Foundation Award for poetry, the Lamar York Prize for Nonfiction, and a Bright Hill Press chapbook award for The Man Who Went Out for Cigarettes (Bright Hill Press, 1996).
Contact: Professor Debra Spark, 872-3257, daspark@colby.edu

Tuesday, February 22, 7:30 p.m.
Environmental Studies Evening Colloquium
“More Food Equals More Forest – A Sustainable Model for Rural Development in the Tropics”

Room 1, Olin Science Center
In 1997, Florence Reed founded Sustainable Harvest International (SHI), a nonprofit organization dedicated to working with rural Central American communities to implement sustainable land-use practices. Over the past seven years, SHI has helped more than 700 families in Honduras, Panama, Belize and Nicaragua switch to sustainable land-use practices.
Contact: Beth Kopp, 872-3782, bkkopp@colby.edu

Thursday, February 24, 7 p.m.
The George E. Murray Debate Society
Whitney Room, Roberts Building
In these weekly, parliamentary-style debates, the teams do not know the topic until ten minutes before the debate starts. After each debate, members of the audience are invited to speak on the topic. A prize of $25 is awarded for the best of those speeches. Refreshments are served.
Contact: Professor David Mills, 859-5275, dhmills@colby.edu

Friday, February 25, 1 p.m.
Philosophy Colloquium
“Why Does God Create?”
with Professor Marcy Lascano of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Room 215, Lovejoy Building
Contact: Grace Von Tobel, 872-3416, gkvontob@colby.edu

Friday, February 25, 7:30 p.m
Bennett Dance Company Presents: Air and Water
Strider Theater, Runnals Building
Original choreography in two collaborative works takes dancers from 18 feet above ground to submerged under water.
Tickets: $2 with Colby I.D. and for seniors; $3 general admission. Box office open Monday through Saturday during the week of the performance from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Contact: Deborah Ward, 872-3388, djward@colby.edu

Monday, February 28, noon–5 p.m.
Blood Drive
Page Commons, Cotter Union
Contact: Kelly Wharton, 859-4280, kwharton@colby.edu

Ongoing Exhibits at the Colby College Museum of Art

October 28, 2004–February 6
Currents 1: Julianne Swartz
The first in an annual series of emerging artist exhibitions, Currents 1 features work by installation and sound artist Julianne Swartz. Swartz uses light and sound to explore the thresholds of perception. Her installations challenge the viewer to see and hear elements within the environment that may have gone previously unnoticed.

October 3, 2004–February 13
Photography at Colby: Recent Acquisitions and the Promised Gift of Dr. and Mrs. William Tsiaras ’68
From the resolutely modernist work of Paul Strand to the recent conceptual work of Nikki S. Lee, Photography at Colby explores a variety of photographic practices. The promised gift of Dr. William Tsiaras ’68 and Nancy Meyer Tsiaras ’68 significantly expands the scope of the museum’s photography holdings, including works by Lauren Greenfield, Diana Michner, Robert Polidori, William Wegman, and Garry Winogrand.

February 11–April 24
Garry Mitchell
Every year the Museum features a one-person exhibition by a member of the studio faculty from the Art Department, exposing our audiences to the work of those who instruct the future artists among our students. This year we are privileged to present the work of Garry Mitchell, who has taught at Colby for 7 years. This exhibition will feature more than twenty-five recent paintings that combine a calligraphic quality of line and atmospheric space with his unique sensibility as a colorist.

February 24–April 24
Richard Serra: Large Scale Prints
(Organized by the Addison Gallery of American Art)
Richard Serra may be among the most ambitious, influential, and challenging artists working today, producing sculpture as well as two-dimensional works that are rigorously abstract, physically unsentimental, and aesthetically confrontational. 4-5-6, the three-part steel sculpture that frames the museum entrance, has become a touchstone of the museum’s identity since its installation in 2000. In addition to his monumental, site-specific steel sculptures, the artist has also pursued a parallel body of work as a printmaker. This exhibition brings together 37 of his large-scale prints executed between 1972 and 2001, principally drawn from the collection of Colby Trustee Paul J. Schupf (H ’91).

The Colby College Museum of Art is open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. It is closed on Mondays. Admission is free, and the museum is accessible to people with disabilities. For more information call 207-872-3228 or visit www.colby.edu/museum/.